Juno Reviews

  • Oct 07, 2019

    Another lonely date night with myself! Both Michael Cera and Ellen Page are sweethearts in the acting world, very grateful for them! The ending is super cute, but no guy will ever like or care for me the way any of these movie men will so it doesn't really matter!

    Another lonely date night with myself! Both Michael Cera and Ellen Page are sweethearts in the acting world, very grateful for them! The ending is super cute, but no guy will ever like or care for me the way any of these movie men will so it doesn't really matter!

  • Oct 02, 2019

    All I knew about Juno before I watched it was that the story revolved around a pregnant teenager. Thankfully, that’s all you really need to know about the movie, because there isn’t much more plot beyond that. This sassy high schooler discovers her pregnancy in the first scene of the movie, and eventually decides to carry the baby to full term and give it up for adoption. There are some interesting relationship dynamics explored between Juno and those around her. I got the most enjoyment out of her connection with her father, but perhaps that’s just because he is played by the amazing J.K. Simmons. The most complex and confused relationship is the one between Juno and the potential adoptive parents played by Jason Bateman and Jennifer Garner. This is the aspect of the film that hit me in an emotional way, because I know firsthand what it’s like to deal with infertility. It was both humorous and heartbreaking to see the blasé attitude of Juno towards the adoption contrasted with the desperation of this couple. Ellen Page is excellent as Juno, because she can be kind of mouthy but also endearing. I laughed a ton because of her matter-of-fact way of approaching people. It made her seem quirky but without being overly mean-spirited. Michael Cera just felt like Scott Pilgrim to me, as if Juno was his trial run for that role, or he simply isn’t a versatile actor and this is the only performance he can deliver. At times I questioned the dialogue, because there is definitely some odd language in the script. It feels like an adult imagining what teens talk like, instead of being natural adolescent conversation. All of this dialogue made me chuckle, though, so I guess it worked well enough for me. I appreciated that the movie never once felt preachy and it didn’t feel the need to vilify characters to make a point. Juno is heartwarming in its simplicity, and even though it didn’t take me on a long winding journey full of complicated subplots, I was still interested to see where it would go. It isn’t a movie that blew me away, but it was entirely pleasant to watch, and is one I’ll probably watch again when I run across it on TV or a streaming service.

    All I knew about Juno before I watched it was that the story revolved around a pregnant teenager. Thankfully, that’s all you really need to know about the movie, because there isn’t much more plot beyond that. This sassy high schooler discovers her pregnancy in the first scene of the movie, and eventually decides to carry the baby to full term and give it up for adoption. There are some interesting relationship dynamics explored between Juno and those around her. I got the most enjoyment out of her connection with her father, but perhaps that’s just because he is played by the amazing J.K. Simmons. The most complex and confused relationship is the one between Juno and the potential adoptive parents played by Jason Bateman and Jennifer Garner. This is the aspect of the film that hit me in an emotional way, because I know firsthand what it’s like to deal with infertility. It was both humorous and heartbreaking to see the blasé attitude of Juno towards the adoption contrasted with the desperation of this couple. Ellen Page is excellent as Juno, because she can be kind of mouthy but also endearing. I laughed a ton because of her matter-of-fact way of approaching people. It made her seem quirky but without being overly mean-spirited. Michael Cera just felt like Scott Pilgrim to me, as if Juno was his trial run for that role, or he simply isn’t a versatile actor and this is the only performance he can deliver. At times I questioned the dialogue, because there is definitely some odd language in the script. It feels like an adult imagining what teens talk like, instead of being natural adolescent conversation. All of this dialogue made me chuckle, though, so I guess it worked well enough for me. I appreciated that the movie never once felt preachy and it didn’t feel the need to vilify characters to make a point. Juno is heartwarming in its simplicity, and even though it didn’t take me on a long winding journey full of complicated subplots, I was still interested to see where it would go. It isn’t a movie that blew me away, but it was entirely pleasant to watch, and is one I’ll probably watch again when I run across it on TV or a streaming service.

  • Sep 30, 2019

    Surfs a wave of cutetsiness, often managing funny and occasionally smart, but frequently dips into smug and very affected.

    Surfs a wave of cutetsiness, often managing funny and occasionally smart, but frequently dips into smug and very affected.

  • Sep 15, 2019

    Pretty good movie- enjoyed all characters but juno

    Pretty good movie- enjoyed all characters but juno

  • May 02, 2019

    Juno has some of that quirky indieness in it, but does amount heart in dealing with such a controversial topic

    Juno has some of that quirky indieness in it, but does amount heart in dealing with such a controversial topic

  • Apr 19, 2019

    This is one of Jason Reitman's finest films with the snappy writing of Diablo Cody, Ellen Page's career-defining performance and some surprising character turns combining to create an iconic coming-of-age tale. I don't think it's as good as Young Adult (2011) because the in the end everything wraps up too neatly and Charlize Theron's performance as Mavis eclipses Ellen Page's as Juno but they both exist as their own great Reitman-Cody collaborations. This is a film that I love, a relief after having to live through New York, New York (1997). Everybody knows the story but I'll rattle it off to you anyway, an acerbic teen, Juno, Ellen Page, gets pregnant by her longtime boyfriend Paulie, Michael Cera, then considers getting an abortion and then adoption. She has a loving Father, J. K. Simmons, and an understanding Stepmother, Allison Janney, and finds a kindred spirit in the potential adoptive Father of her child, Jason Bateman, whilst clashing with his wife, Jennifer Garner. Her friendship with Leah, Olivia Thirlby, also suffers under the weight of her pregnancy which emotionally distances her from those around her. Diablo Cody won Best Original Screenplay in her feature film screenwriting debut and she earned it with the style that would become her signature on full display. The witty prose that Ellen Page delivers has a snap to it that isn't found in other coming-of-age films like Now and Then (1995) as she describes everything from her hamburger phone to the insecurities that teenagers face everyday in her tellingly self-deprecating way. In particular the treatment of Garner's character Vanessa shows a sensitive, intelligent script as the protagonist's view of a woman whom she saw as uptight and difficult morphs as she begins to understand what taking on responsibility means. In a lesser screenplay this shift in perspective could have felt jarring but here it is touching and helps us understands Juno's character development. The capturing of unique characters and relationships is wonderful overall with the depiction of teenage love and the difficulty of having a step-parent portrayed with a delicate touch that belies how much the film cares about it's characters. The scene in which Juno and Paulie are seen conceiving the child that will be the central problem of the film is beautiful because it is not aggressively awkward or overly sexualized it is sweet and gives us a real sense of how much these teenagers care about each other. When she tells him "Do you know how long I've waited for this?", we see the character be vulnerable for once in the film and their love and sexual desire for one another is made clear. Her relationship with her Stepmother also feels real as there is initial tension between them that is eventually cut as they work together to get Juno through her difficult pregnancy. Janney plays a role that she can practically phone in at this point, she's been doing it since the late 1980s, but she has an ability to be a softie with a tough exterior like few actresses and she really works in this role. In terms of Reitman's career this really launched him as an up-and-coming director after the positive critical reception to Thank You For Smoking (2005) and a polite box office haul of $39.3 million on a $10 million budget this film's stratospheric success put him in another league. It earned $231.4 million on a $7.5 million budget and earned 4 Academy Award nominations for it's screenplay, Page's lead performance, Reitman's direction and a nomination for Best Picture, only the screenplay would win in it's category but the message was clear: Reitman was one of the most popular new independent film director. He would further his status as an awards favorite with Up in the Air (2009) but this is the film that first made him wildly popular and I believe that this critical praise is deserved. This is definitely a film that deserves a viewing if you want a surprisingly nuanced coming-of-age tale that contains great writing and performances and brought Reitman to the mainstream. I loved it in a way that many do and it is a film that speaks to most audiences, not just vulnerable teenagers, through it's poignant but funny tone. This is one of his best and possibly his most famous but in my opinion it does not equal Young Adult (2011).

    This is one of Jason Reitman's finest films with the snappy writing of Diablo Cody, Ellen Page's career-defining performance and some surprising character turns combining to create an iconic coming-of-age tale. I don't think it's as good as Young Adult (2011) because the in the end everything wraps up too neatly and Charlize Theron's performance as Mavis eclipses Ellen Page's as Juno but they both exist as their own great Reitman-Cody collaborations. This is a film that I love, a relief after having to live through New York, New York (1997). Everybody knows the story but I'll rattle it off to you anyway, an acerbic teen, Juno, Ellen Page, gets pregnant by her longtime boyfriend Paulie, Michael Cera, then considers getting an abortion and then adoption. She has a loving Father, J. K. Simmons, and an understanding Stepmother, Allison Janney, and finds a kindred spirit in the potential adoptive Father of her child, Jason Bateman, whilst clashing with his wife, Jennifer Garner. Her friendship with Leah, Olivia Thirlby, also suffers under the weight of her pregnancy which emotionally distances her from those around her. Diablo Cody won Best Original Screenplay in her feature film screenwriting debut and she earned it with the style that would become her signature on full display. The witty prose that Ellen Page delivers has a snap to it that isn't found in other coming-of-age films like Now and Then (1995) as she describes everything from her hamburger phone to the insecurities that teenagers face everyday in her tellingly self-deprecating way. In particular the treatment of Garner's character Vanessa shows a sensitive, intelligent script as the protagonist's view of a woman whom she saw as uptight and difficult morphs as she begins to understand what taking on responsibility means. In a lesser screenplay this shift in perspective could have felt jarring but here it is touching and helps us understands Juno's character development. The capturing of unique characters and relationships is wonderful overall with the depiction of teenage love and the difficulty of having a step-parent portrayed with a delicate touch that belies how much the film cares about it's characters. The scene in which Juno and Paulie are seen conceiving the child that will be the central problem of the film is beautiful because it is not aggressively awkward or overly sexualized it is sweet and gives us a real sense of how much these teenagers care about each other. When she tells him "Do you know how long I've waited for this?", we see the character be vulnerable for once in the film and their love and sexual desire for one another is made clear. Her relationship with her Stepmother also feels real as there is initial tension between them that is eventually cut as they work together to get Juno through her difficult pregnancy. Janney plays a role that she can practically phone in at this point, she's been doing it since the late 1980s, but she has an ability to be a softie with a tough exterior like few actresses and she really works in this role. In terms of Reitman's career this really launched him as an up-and-coming director after the positive critical reception to Thank You For Smoking (2005) and a polite box office haul of $39.3 million on a $10 million budget this film's stratospheric success put him in another league. It earned $231.4 million on a $7.5 million budget and earned 4 Academy Award nominations for it's screenplay, Page's lead performance, Reitman's direction and a nomination for Best Picture, only the screenplay would win in it's category but the message was clear: Reitman was one of the most popular new independent film director. He would further his status as an awards favorite with Up in the Air (2009) but this is the film that first made him wildly popular and I believe that this critical praise is deserved. This is definitely a film that deserves a viewing if you want a surprisingly nuanced coming-of-age tale that contains great writing and performances and brought Reitman to the mainstream. I loved it in a way that many do and it is a film that speaks to most audiences, not just vulnerable teenagers, through it's poignant but funny tone. This is one of his best and possibly his most famous but in my opinion it does not equal Young Adult (2011).

  • Mar 25, 2019

    All too realistic as a pregnant teen

    All too realistic as a pregnant teen

  • Mar 11, 2019

    Smart, witty, funny, human and full of heart. Juno packs a true gut punch of reality with fantastic performances, a superb script and stellar direction. Reitman has done it again. 5/5 stars

    Smart, witty, funny, human and full of heart. Juno packs a true gut punch of reality with fantastic performances, a superb script and stellar direction. Reitman has done it again. 5/5 stars

  • Feb 20, 2019

    I cannot stand Ellen Page anymore. She used to be an actress, now she's just an annoying full time LBGXYZ activist. One more on my list of SJW snowflakes I'm gonna avoid in the future...

    I cannot stand Ellen Page anymore. She used to be an actress, now she's just an annoying full time LBGXYZ activist. One more on my list of SJW snowflakes I'm gonna avoid in the future...

  • Dec 30, 2018

    Funny, light and heartwarming; Juno succeeds in resolving problematic characters in its ending, which comes to be very relatable and sincere such that was elevated by a smart storyline and empathetic portrayals.

    Funny, light and heartwarming; Juno succeeds in resolving problematic characters in its ending, which comes to be very relatable and sincere such that was elevated by a smart storyline and empathetic portrayals.