Knock Down the House Reviews

  • 6d ago

    Way too much fiction to be called a documentary.

    Way too much fiction to be called a documentary.

  • 6d ago

    This is political propaganda at its finest.

    This is political propaganda at its finest.

  • Oct 09, 2019

    Pure pandering, forget political views it's just not compelling.

    Pure pandering, forget political views it's just not compelling.

  • Oct 09, 2019

    Just for once i'm lost for words.

    Just for once i'm lost for words.

  • Oct 04, 2019

    Absolutely nothing more than propaganda drivel. Nothing has a 100% rating without it being bull, goes to show you can't trust movie critics at all.

    Absolutely nothing more than propaganda drivel. Nothing has a 100% rating without it being bull, goes to show you can't trust movie critics at all.

  • Oct 04, 2019

    propagandistic garbage

    propagandistic garbage

  • Oct 02, 2019

    Seriously the worst thing i tried to watch

    Seriously the worst thing i tried to watch

  • Oct 01, 2019

    Knock Down the House is a dreadful film masquerading as a documentary. It should instead be called: Political Ads: The Movie or perhaps AOC and a Few Other Women: The Movie. It is not an enlightening look at the underdogs trying to take on the D.C. establishment, but rather it feels like an irritating puff piece that holds its subjects on a golden pedestal, rather than taking a clinical, impartial approach as it should. Hell, even as a clearly biased piece, it could have still been interesting. But this film is about exciting as the now seemingly endless campaign ads we as Americans are subjected to these days. Apparently, we aren't allowed to be freed of elections for any length of time. The documentary follows four women running for Congress: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Amy Vilela of Nevada, Cori Bush of Missouri, and Paula Jean Swearengin of West Virginia. None of these women have any background in politics, but are driven to take on the establishment, having been inspired by their backgrounds: bartender, a former financial adviser, a pastor and nurse, and the daughter of a coal mining family. Each have their reasons and particular passions, such as the economy and the working class, the issues of race, police brutality, medicare, and more. The film follows each of their campaigns up until their eventual outcomes. Despite following four women, it's clear who the favorite subject of the four was: AOC. Sure, she actually won, and one could make a case for why the focus is mainly on her, but the other women are sidelined to a ridiculous degree. In the scheme of life, they'll only be tiny footnotes in the endless stream of candidates for the offices of politics, but they actually seemed to have potentially interesting stories and how they conflate with their beliefs that are given so little attention. Amy Vilela was not only former financial adviser who gave up everything to run for Congress, but her story is the most sympathetic. Even as someone who doesn't lean left on a number of issues, she had actual points to make. It is a heart-wrenching moment in the film when she talks about losing her daughter because she didn't have the coverage to get the medical tests that could have saved her life. There is also a moment of levity within that dark story as she carries her daughter's urn because the daughter didn't want to stay in one location. In a political climate that inspires nothing but cynicism, this part of the film was a rare unicorn moment in politics that rang true. I didn't feel condescending bullshit trying to exploit tragedy...it felt real. Sadly, her story is sidelined. Swearengin seemed to also have an interesting backstory, given her background of being part of a coal mining family and how her state feels left behind compared to the rest of the country as corporations come in and tear apart the land with a lack of safety standards to boot (Her area has a troubling number of residents suffering from cancer). Beyond that, and maybe a few of her political points, we as the viewer are barely acquainted with her. There's a story to her, but again, she gets sidelined. Cori Bush, both a pastor and nurse, wants to tackle the issues of race and police brutality, in particular, being influenced by the hotly debated death of Michael Brown. Aside from a few talking points, her story doesn't go past that point with this film. She gets sidelined worst of all. It's barely any better if at all than my paragraph about her in this review...I'm not kidding. Nay, the star of this show is AOC, the bartender. Unlike the other women, she felt fake and insincere. Her life is also particularly uninteresting and even when she tries to be sympathetic as presented by the viewer, she instead embodies everything one could dislike about establishment politicians. She's condescending, uses others (Her own niece is used to help pass out flyers and look cute for potential voters), uses inflammatory rhetoric about women and race, loudly argues instead of debating, and more. She is a user and abuser of issues, milking the fiery Twitter crowd that no one else likes. There is not one moment that rings true with her - it all feels like a show and a means to gain the ultimate reward. Even tragedy isn't off-limits, when she's in D.C. at the end of the film and talks about her deceased father...it feels about as real her infamous border fence picture (It all feels like an act and she's a damn lousy actress, to boot). Unfortunately, despite being so unlikable, she's the star of the show, while the much more interesting women are sidelined. Worst of all, the film worships her as a hero of sorts standing up against the corruption of politics when she is already well on her way to rubbing elbows with the most loathsome of the establishment. Though, perhaps given this modern age of politics, perhaps she was born for her job...using and abusing issues. In the end, Knock Down the House is nothing but a worship of AOC, throwing the other, more interesting subjects under the bus. It's also a thoroughly biased piece with too few moments that feel genuine. Hell, it also doesn't even have much charisma with its biased subject matter that could still intrigue viewers. Instead, it's an 86-minute puff piece and political ad for the ever-swelling ego of AOC with a few other political talking points thrown in from the other subjects. It's dreadful, tedious, and will only appeal to a very small minority of viewers who themselves worship the subject at hand. It's not informative, it's biased as hell, and worst of all, boring.

    Knock Down the House is a dreadful film masquerading as a documentary. It should instead be called: Political Ads: The Movie or perhaps AOC and a Few Other Women: The Movie. It is not an enlightening look at the underdogs trying to take on the D.C. establishment, but rather it feels like an irritating puff piece that holds its subjects on a golden pedestal, rather than taking a clinical, impartial approach as it should. Hell, even as a clearly biased piece, it could have still been interesting. But this film is about exciting as the now seemingly endless campaign ads we as Americans are subjected to these days. Apparently, we aren't allowed to be freed of elections for any length of time. The documentary follows four women running for Congress: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Amy Vilela of Nevada, Cori Bush of Missouri, and Paula Jean Swearengin of West Virginia. None of these women have any background in politics, but are driven to take on the establishment, having been inspired by their backgrounds: bartender, a former financial adviser, a pastor and nurse, and the daughter of a coal mining family. Each have their reasons and particular passions, such as the economy and the working class, the issues of race, police brutality, medicare, and more. The film follows each of their campaigns up until their eventual outcomes. Despite following four women, it's clear who the favorite subject of the four was: AOC. Sure, she actually won, and one could make a case for why the focus is mainly on her, but the other women are sidelined to a ridiculous degree. In the scheme of life, they'll only be tiny footnotes in the endless stream of candidates for the offices of politics, but they actually seemed to have potentially interesting stories and how they conflate with their beliefs that are given so little attention. Amy Vilela was not only former financial adviser who gave up everything to run for Congress, but her story is the most sympathetic. Even as someone who doesn't lean left on a number of issues, she had actual points to make. It is a heart-wrenching moment in the film when she talks about losing her daughter because she didn't have the coverage to get the medical tests that could have saved her life. There is also a moment of levity within that dark story as she carries her daughter's urn because the daughter didn't want to stay in one location. In a political climate that inspires nothing but cynicism, this part of the film was a rare unicorn moment in politics that rang true. I didn't feel condescending bullshit trying to exploit tragedy...it felt real. Sadly, her story is sidelined. Swearengin seemed to also have an interesting backstory, given her background of being part of a coal mining family and how her state feels left behind compared to the rest of the country as corporations come in and tear apart the land with a lack of safety standards to boot (Her area has a troubling number of residents suffering from cancer). Beyond that, and maybe a few of her political points, we as the viewer are barely acquainted with her. There's a story to her, but again, she gets sidelined. Cori Bush, both a pastor and nurse, wants to tackle the issues of race and police brutality, in particular, being influenced by the hotly debated death of Michael Brown. Aside from a few talking points, her story doesn't go past that point with this film. She gets sidelined worst of all. It's barely any better if at all than my paragraph about her in this review...I'm not kidding. Nay, the star of this show is AOC, the bartender. Unlike the other women, she felt fake and insincere. Her life is also particularly uninteresting and even when she tries to be sympathetic as presented by the viewer, she instead embodies everything one could dislike about establishment politicians. She's condescending, uses others (Her own niece is used to help pass out flyers and look cute for potential voters), uses inflammatory rhetoric about women and race, loudly argues instead of debating, and more. She is a user and abuser of issues, milking the fiery Twitter crowd that no one else likes. There is not one moment that rings true with her - it all feels like a show and a means to gain the ultimate reward. Even tragedy isn't off-limits, when she's in D.C. at the end of the film and talks about her deceased father...it feels about as real her infamous border fence picture (It all feels like an act and she's a damn lousy actress, to boot). Unfortunately, despite being so unlikable, she's the star of the show, while the much more interesting women are sidelined. Worst of all, the film worships her as a hero of sorts standing up against the corruption of politics when she is already well on her way to rubbing elbows with the most loathsome of the establishment. Though, perhaps given this modern age of politics, perhaps she was born for her job...using and abusing issues. In the end, Knock Down the House is nothing but a worship of AOC, throwing the other, more interesting subjects under the bus. It's also a thoroughly biased piece with too few moments that feel genuine. Hell, it also doesn't even have much charisma with its biased subject matter that could still intrigue viewers. Instead, it's an 86-minute puff piece and political ad for the ever-swelling ego of AOC with a few other political talking points thrown in from the other subjects. It's dreadful, tedious, and will only appeal to a very small minority of viewers who themselves worship the subject at hand. It's not informative, it's biased as hell, and worst of all, boring.

  • Sep 30, 2019

    Revealing and clear. Really makes a solid case explaining why this grass roots movement was so successful.

    Revealing and clear. Really makes a solid case explaining why this grass roots movement was so successful.

  • Sep 26, 2019

    Horrible. I had to turn this off after ten min

    Horrible. I had to turn this off after ten min