Love Is Strange Reviews

  • Nov 16, 2019

    Love is strange is a well-made indie movie. Performances are top-notch but the movie unfortunately is not all that engaging in a little slow paced places. It has a good story in script but I feel that could’ve been more to the movie. Still worth watching for the amazing performances.

    Love is strange is a well-made indie movie. Performances are top-notch but the movie unfortunately is not all that engaging in a little slow paced places. It has a good story in script but I feel that could’ve been more to the movie. Still worth watching for the amazing performances.

  • Apr 05, 2019

    Nice and delightful.

    Nice and delightful.

  • Jan 17, 2019

    Love might be strange indeed, but this movie is definitely not. Quiet and lovely maybe, but why strange I have no idea. And I know we are just talking about the title here, but I don't know... maybe I was expecting more. If it was called "Love is routinary" at least I was prepared for it. So be aware: this is a simple realistic drama about every day life, with some good performances and more heart than art.

    Love might be strange indeed, but this movie is definitely not. Quiet and lovely maybe, but why strange I have no idea. And I know we are just talking about the title here, but I don't know... maybe I was expecting more. If it was called "Love is routinary" at least I was prepared for it. So be aware: this is a simple realistic drama about every day life, with some good performances and more heart than art.

  • Dec 23, 2018

    Just a normal drama, nothing major, nothing new, and certainly not deserving of the 94% approval rating.

    Just a normal drama, nothing major, nothing new, and certainly not deserving of the 94% approval rating.

  • May 24, 2017

    Although it utilises the same plot device as Make Way for Tomorrow (1937), in which an older couple is forced to sell their home and move to separate lodgings with their not-so-willing relatives, Ira Sachs's film transports the situation to the modern day and stars John Lithgow and Alfred Molina as the couple, newly married but together for nearly 40 years before the separation. Sachs doesn't follow in the earlier film's tear-jerking footsteps however and instead gently offers a naturalistic slice of life in a contemplative mood (aided by a pleasant piano score and some poetic interludes). The politics of gay life is manifested a few times: a blissful wedding soon gives way to Molina losing his job as music teacher at a Catholic school for formalizing his already acknowledged relationship, Lithgow makes a quick reference to Stonewall-era protests - but these examples seem unusual in the context of the loving acceptance offered to them by everyone in the picture. And love is certainly the focus (as it was in 1937) with the loving Lithgow/Molina relationship always centre stage (and beautifully acted), even as their living arrangements create strain on their relationships with others (including niece-in-law Marisa Tomei). The film isn't perfect: a couple of subplots don't really get started and distract away from the main story and then things end rather abruptly. Yet, for all its brevity, it was very pleasant to spend some time in New York City with these real people and their open-minded and creative friends and family. There didn't seem to be anything strange about this at all!

    Although it utilises the same plot device as Make Way for Tomorrow (1937), in which an older couple is forced to sell their home and move to separate lodgings with their not-so-willing relatives, Ira Sachs's film transports the situation to the modern day and stars John Lithgow and Alfred Molina as the couple, newly married but together for nearly 40 years before the separation. Sachs doesn't follow in the earlier film's tear-jerking footsteps however and instead gently offers a naturalistic slice of life in a contemplative mood (aided by a pleasant piano score and some poetic interludes). The politics of gay life is manifested a few times: a blissful wedding soon gives way to Molina losing his job as music teacher at a Catholic school for formalizing his already acknowledged relationship, Lithgow makes a quick reference to Stonewall-era protests - but these examples seem unusual in the context of the loving acceptance offered to them by everyone in the picture. And love is certainly the focus (as it was in 1937) with the loving Lithgow/Molina relationship always centre stage (and beautifully acted), even as their living arrangements create strain on their relationships with others (including niece-in-law Marisa Tomei). The film isn't perfect: a couple of subplots don't really get started and distract away from the main story and then things end rather abruptly. Yet, for all its brevity, it was very pleasant to spend some time in New York City with these real people and their open-minded and creative friends and family. There didn't seem to be anything strange about this at all!

  • Dec 27, 2016

    This film is really strange.

    This film is really strange.

  • Oct 21, 2016

    A Chopin piano soundtrack underscores the poignancy in this love story of two elderly gay men rendered homeless in an unfortunate consequence of their marriage.

    A Chopin piano soundtrack underscores the poignancy in this love story of two elderly gay men rendered homeless in an unfortunate consequence of their marriage.

  • Aug 31, 2016

    When love lasts for a life time :D

    When love lasts for a life time :D

  • Aug 15, 2016

    With the Irish people recently voting to legalise same-sex marriage in their country, it seemed the right time to review a film about one such relationship. LOVE IS STRANGE premiered in January 2014 at the Sundance Film Festival and has been doing the festival circuit pretty much non-stop ever since. It had its local premiere at last year's Hong Kong Lesbian & Gay Film Festival. LOVE IS STRANGE is definitely not your typical gay film. Ben and George are not young, they don't seem to have seen the inside of gym in quite a while, they don't hang out in bars or clubs, ... they pretty much don't adhere to any other stereotype we may have of gay men. Played by veteran actors John Lithgow and Alfred Molina, respectively, Ben and George seem like everyday people. Ben is a retired artist; George teaches music at a Catholic school in New York. After nearly 40 years together, they finally get married in an intimate ceremony with their family and friends on hand to offer their support and love. The morning of their big day seems like every other day. They fuss, they fret, they rush and they comfort. Ben and George's love seems anything but strange. The traditional vows of "for better or worse" are put to the test, though, soon after their wedding day when George loses his job. His school's archdiocese had closed their eyes to his sexual orientation all these years but getting married crossed their line. Now unable to meet the mortgage payments on their co-op apartment, the men must sell it and temporary live apart until they can find a new home that they can afford. Ben moves in with his nephew's family in Brooklyn. George stays in the city, moving one floor down to sleep on the sofa belonging to two gay cops. Physical separation, the stress of losing a job, an income and a home, and having to bunk with family and friends at an advanced age puts a lot of strain on the men. As Ben says, "When you live with people, you know them better than you care to." Fortunately, their love, dedication and commitment to each other hold them together. LOVE IS STRANGE is not preachy save for one voiceover toward the end of the film where George tells the parents of his former students that he hopes they will encourage their children to discover who they are and who they can be. However, watching Ben and George, one can't help but notice that love, compassion, understanding and humour in moments of adversity are traits that are not the exclusive domain of heterosexuals.

    With the Irish people recently voting to legalise same-sex marriage in their country, it seemed the right time to review a film about one such relationship. LOVE IS STRANGE premiered in January 2014 at the Sundance Film Festival and has been doing the festival circuit pretty much non-stop ever since. It had its local premiere at last year's Hong Kong Lesbian & Gay Film Festival. LOVE IS STRANGE is definitely not your typical gay film. Ben and George are not young, they don't seem to have seen the inside of gym in quite a while, they don't hang out in bars or clubs, ... they pretty much don't adhere to any other stereotype we may have of gay men. Played by veteran actors John Lithgow and Alfred Molina, respectively, Ben and George seem like everyday people. Ben is a retired artist; George teaches music at a Catholic school in New York. After nearly 40 years together, they finally get married in an intimate ceremony with their family and friends on hand to offer their support and love. The morning of their big day seems like every other day. They fuss, they fret, they rush and they comfort. Ben and George's love seems anything but strange. The traditional vows of "for better or worse" are put to the test, though, soon after their wedding day when George loses his job. His school's archdiocese had closed their eyes to his sexual orientation all these years but getting married crossed their line. Now unable to meet the mortgage payments on their co-op apartment, the men must sell it and temporary live apart until they can find a new home that they can afford. Ben moves in with his nephew's family in Brooklyn. George stays in the city, moving one floor down to sleep on the sofa belonging to two gay cops. Physical separation, the stress of losing a job, an income and a home, and having to bunk with family and friends at an advanced age puts a lot of strain on the men. As Ben says, "When you live with people, you know them better than you care to." Fortunately, their love, dedication and commitment to each other hold them together. LOVE IS STRANGE is not preachy save for one voiceover toward the end of the film where George tells the parents of his former students that he hopes they will encourage their children to discover who they are and who they can be. However, watching Ben and George, one can't help but notice that love, compassion, understanding and humour in moments of adversity are traits that are not the exclusive domain of heterosexuals.

  • Aug 07, 2016

    cinegeek.de Love Is Strange von Ira Sachs vertraut seiner wundervollen Geschichte so sehr, dass sie simpel erzählt wird. Es geht ums Altwerden, die New Yorker Mieten, Familie, Arbeit, vor allem aber um die Liebe. Letztlich ist die Liebe gar nicht seltsam. Liebe ist natürlich. Sie ist das, was wir fühlen, wenn wir das Glück haben, es zu erleben! Ben (John Lithgow) und George (Alfred Molina) heiraten nach fast vierzig Jahren. George, ein Lehrer, sorgt vor allem dafür, dass Ben das Leben leichter nimmt. Die Grösse des Films besteht darin, dass wir ganz genau wissen, wie die Beiden sind und was sie füreinander bedeuten! Wegen der Heirat aber verliert George seinen Job an der katholischen Schule und das Paar kann sich die Miete nicht mehr leisten. Sie müssen nun auf Couches von Freunden schlafen, um eine neue Obdach zu suchen. Zeitweise (wie man so schön sagt) trennen sie sich - nachdem sie ihr halben Leben gemeinsam verbrachten! Wir erkennen die Bequemlichkeit einer solchen Beziehung, bemerken aber auch, wie instabil das alles ist (die flüchtigen schnellen Blicke nach anderen Männern). Love Is Strange funktioniert in einem ganz eigenen Rhythmus. Hör dir die Dialoge an, wie sie fast wie Musikstücke treiben! Immer ist da dieser Unterton von Melancholie, ja Schmerz. Sachs führt seine Regie nicht wie ein Angeber, sondern erlaubt uns, dass wir ganz langsam das Seelenleben seiner Helden erforschen. Wir dürfen uns ein eigenes Bild machen, nicht alles wird zugespitzt. Da ist diese Szene, in welcher George einem jungen Schüler Chopin beibringt. Etwas ist da in dem Stück, dass ihm die Tränen ins Gesicht treibt. Tränen, die er verbirgt. Love Is Strange ist ein Film, der beobachtet. Ein Werk, in dem jedes Detail wichtig ist. Letztlich sinds die Einzelteile, die hier ein Gefühl von Transzendenz vermitteln. Sachs lässt diese Momente zu; er muss nicht jedes Gefühl betonen. Ein geduldiger Film, der seinen Protagonisten immer einen privaten Raum lässt.

    cinegeek.de Love Is Strange von Ira Sachs vertraut seiner wundervollen Geschichte so sehr, dass sie simpel erzählt wird. Es geht ums Altwerden, die New Yorker Mieten, Familie, Arbeit, vor allem aber um die Liebe. Letztlich ist die Liebe gar nicht seltsam. Liebe ist natürlich. Sie ist das, was wir fühlen, wenn wir das Glück haben, es zu erleben! Ben (John Lithgow) und George (Alfred Molina) heiraten nach fast vierzig Jahren. George, ein Lehrer, sorgt vor allem dafür, dass Ben das Leben leichter nimmt. Die Grösse des Films besteht darin, dass wir ganz genau wissen, wie die Beiden sind und was sie füreinander bedeuten! Wegen der Heirat aber verliert George seinen Job an der katholischen Schule und das Paar kann sich die Miete nicht mehr leisten. Sie müssen nun auf Couches von Freunden schlafen, um eine neue Obdach zu suchen. Zeitweise (wie man so schön sagt) trennen sie sich - nachdem sie ihr halben Leben gemeinsam verbrachten! Wir erkennen die Bequemlichkeit einer solchen Beziehung, bemerken aber auch, wie instabil das alles ist (die flüchtigen schnellen Blicke nach anderen Männern). Love Is Strange funktioniert in einem ganz eigenen Rhythmus. Hör dir die Dialoge an, wie sie fast wie Musikstücke treiben! Immer ist da dieser Unterton von Melancholie, ja Schmerz. Sachs führt seine Regie nicht wie ein Angeber, sondern erlaubt uns, dass wir ganz langsam das Seelenleben seiner Helden erforschen. Wir dürfen uns ein eigenes Bild machen, nicht alles wird zugespitzt. Da ist diese Szene, in welcher George einem jungen Schüler Chopin beibringt. Etwas ist da in dem Stück, dass ihm die Tränen ins Gesicht treibt. Tränen, die er verbirgt. Love Is Strange ist ein Film, der beobachtet. Ein Werk, in dem jedes Detail wichtig ist. Letztlich sinds die Einzelteile, die hier ein Gefühl von Transzendenz vermitteln. Sachs lässt diese Momente zu; er muss nicht jedes Gefühl betonen. Ein geduldiger Film, der seinen Protagonisten immer einen privaten Raum lässt.