Lucky Reviews

  • 4d ago

    Not always completely convincing, but avoids sentimentality and at times brushes on the profound and sublime.

    Not always completely convincing, but avoids sentimentality and at times brushes on the profound and sublime.

  • Sep 03, 2019

    Beautiful film about what it means to live fully - without pants.

    Beautiful film about what it means to live fully - without pants.

  • Jul 07, 2019

    Lucky is an interesting little film about life of an older man. Performances from everybody in this film are top-notch. If you enjoy watching great performances you’ll love this movie. The script is sharp and although I wish more happened in the movie it’s still very enjoyable to watch. It’s a very good movie with some meaning behind it.

    Lucky is an interesting little film about life of an older man. Performances from everybody in this film are top-notch. If you enjoy watching great performances you’ll love this movie. The script is sharp and although I wish more happened in the movie it’s still very enjoyable to watch. It’s a very good movie with some meaning behind it.

  • Jan 25, 2019

    8/10 slow, with a drink on your hand

    8/10 slow, with a drink on your hand

  • Jan 08, 2019

    Interesting - life of an old man

    Interesting - life of an old man

  • Dec 28, 2018

    Un film molto semplice, intimo e personale che conclude alla perfezione la carriera dell'attore protagonista. Con sobrietà e moderazione vengono presentati grandi temi filosofici, dalla guerra alla paura della morte, fino a sfiorare il limite tra scienza e religione. Il tutto viene gestito con delicatezza, in un ritratto breve ma intenso di un grande personaggio. La tipologia di film e il finale particolare vengono collegate alla situazione reale dell'attore protagonista, che ci offre la sua ultima, commovente interpretazione.

    Un film molto semplice, intimo e personale che conclude alla perfezione la carriera dell'attore protagonista. Con sobrietà e moderazione vengono presentati grandi temi filosofici, dalla guerra alla paura della morte, fino a sfiorare il limite tra scienza e religione. Il tutto viene gestito con delicatezza, in un ritratto breve ma intenso di un grande personaggio. La tipologia di film e il finale particolare vengono collegate alla situazione reale dell'attore protagonista, che ci offre la sua ultima, commovente interpretazione.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Lucky (2017) #MovieReview 3,5 �� A vida de Lucky, um homem de noventa anos e sua vida. Tocante filme e ótima atuação de Stanton e Lynch.

    Lucky (2017) #MovieReview 3,5 �� A vida de Lucky, um homem de noventa anos e sua vida. Tocante filme e ótima atuação de Stanton e Lynch.

  • Oct 19, 2018

    very slow and boring and not really my thing.

    very slow and boring and not really my thing.

  • Sep 18, 2018

    This is a fine swan song for Harry Dean Stanton.

    This is a fine swan song for Harry Dean Stanton.

  • Sep 03, 2018

    A meditation on mortality Lucky is the directorial debut of prolific actor John Carroll Lynch, but more noteworthy is that it features the last performance from the legendary Harry Dean Stanton, who was 90 at the time of shooting, and who died two weeks prior to the film's North American release. Written specifically for Stanton by Logan Sparks and Drago Sumonja, the film is a meditation on mortality, and is as much about Stanton himself as it is the eponymous character. Beginning like a quirky comedy populated by strange characters with gentle eccentricities, it later morphs into a more serious meditation on how a nonagenarian atheist with no family faces up to the fact that death is not that far away. Laid back and tender, moving entirely at its own measured pace, Lucky works primarily by way of presenting individual vignettes that add up to much more than the sum of their parts. The film tells the story of Lucky (Stanton), a 90-year-old living in an unnamed backwater town on the edge of an Arizonan desert. An atheist who doesn't believe in an afterlife or the soul, never married, and with no children, his life is one of routine, spending his day interacting with the townsfolk; local diner owner Joe (Barry Shabaka Henley) and waitress Loretta (Yvonne Huff); shop-owner Bibi (Bertila Damas); bar-owner Elaine (Beth Grant), her husband Paulie (James Darren), and barman Vincent (Hugo Armstrong), along with Lucky's best friend, Howard (David Lynch). However, when he falls for no apparent reason one morning, the local doctor, Kneedler (Ed Begley Jr.), tries to explain that at his age, the body simply starts to break down. Lucky is a character-driven film, where the vagaries of a well-laid plot simply don't factor into things. This is signalled in the slow and methodical opening sequence, which depicts Lucky ambling past boarded-up and dust covered shops, with the lethargic pace playing out on screen correlating with the lethargic pace of the editing (Lynch allows the characters plenty of room to breathe). This sequence also sets up the style and tone of the film; rather than a cause-and-effect narrative, Lucky is built upon a series of small idiosyncratic moments, often with only the barest amount of connective tissue between them. Neither does Lucky, nor any of the other characters, have a significant arc; he's essentially the same man when the film ends as he was when it began, which is, of course, the whole point. One of the major themes in the film is routine; Lucky's day is rigidly mapped out, to the point that if someone is sitting in his favourite diner seat, it puts him in a bad mood. In this sense, repetition is a major part of both his life and the film's structure. Another important theme is impermanence, which ties into Lucky's rejection of a never-ending life after death. Tied to this, the issue of mortality is brought up time and again, seen most clearly in Howard's dealings with life-insurance man Bobby (Ron Livingston), preparing for his own inevitable death. However, the five yoga exercises Lucky performs each morning are the Five Rites of Rejuvenation, so although he knows that life won't last forever, so too is he doing what he can to prolong it as much as possible. With this in mind, after he falls, the film shifts gears, changing from a pseudo-comic examination of a curmudgeonly old man into a subtle analysis of the inescapability of death and the transitory nature of existence. Working together, the acting, the seemingly insignificant dialogue, the importance of routine, the crumbling town, the desert, all serve to create the whole, which conveys far more than any one aspect of the film could. This is not to say that individual scenes don't work, or are disposable, however. For example, several scenes contain achingly beautiful anecdotes; Lucky's story of accidentally killing a mockingbird as a child; Howard's narration of what he imagines President Roosevelt's birth must have been like; and, in a scene obviously paying homage to a very similar scene in The Straight Story (1999), Lucky and former marine Fred (Tom Skerritt) swapping heart-breaking stories of their time in the war (just like Lucky, Stanton was a cook on board the USS LST-970, which participated in the Battle of Okinawa). If I was to find fault, although the film avoids sentimentality for the most part, it does become a little maudlin towards the end. Additionally, by its very nature, the narrative is very episodic, which creates a slight impression of disconnection. Also, the tone and design work to keep the audience at arm's length, preventing us from becoming too emotionally involved with Lucky himself, something which I'm not entirely sure served the film, or the character, very well. However, these are relatively minor flaws in an otherwise excellent film, and in the end, this is a fitting swan song for an actor of Stanton's calibre. After all, how many people can say they've starred in their own filmic obituary?

    A meditation on mortality Lucky is the directorial debut of prolific actor John Carroll Lynch, but more noteworthy is that it features the last performance from the legendary Harry Dean Stanton, who was 90 at the time of shooting, and who died two weeks prior to the film's North American release. Written specifically for Stanton by Logan Sparks and Drago Sumonja, the film is a meditation on mortality, and is as much about Stanton himself as it is the eponymous character. Beginning like a quirky comedy populated by strange characters with gentle eccentricities, it later morphs into a more serious meditation on how a nonagenarian atheist with no family faces up to the fact that death is not that far away. Laid back and tender, moving entirely at its own measured pace, Lucky works primarily by way of presenting individual vignettes that add up to much more than the sum of their parts. The film tells the story of Lucky (Stanton), a 90-year-old living in an unnamed backwater town on the edge of an Arizonan desert. An atheist who doesn't believe in an afterlife or the soul, never married, and with no children, his life is one of routine, spending his day interacting with the townsfolk; local diner owner Joe (Barry Shabaka Henley) and waitress Loretta (Yvonne Huff); shop-owner Bibi (Bertila Damas); bar-owner Elaine (Beth Grant), her husband Paulie (James Darren), and barman Vincent (Hugo Armstrong), along with Lucky's best friend, Howard (David Lynch). However, when he falls for no apparent reason one morning, the local doctor, Kneedler (Ed Begley Jr.), tries to explain that at his age, the body simply starts to break down. Lucky is a character-driven film, where the vagaries of a well-laid plot simply don't factor into things. This is signalled in the slow and methodical opening sequence, which depicts Lucky ambling past boarded-up and dust covered shops, with the lethargic pace playing out on screen correlating with the lethargic pace of the editing (Lynch allows the characters plenty of room to breathe). This sequence also sets up the style and tone of the film; rather than a cause-and-effect narrative, Lucky is built upon a series of small idiosyncratic moments, often with only the barest amount of connective tissue between them. Neither does Lucky, nor any of the other characters, have a significant arc; he's essentially the same man when the film ends as he was when it began, which is, of course, the whole point. One of the major themes in the film is routine; Lucky's day is rigidly mapped out, to the point that if someone is sitting in his favourite diner seat, it puts him in a bad mood. In this sense, repetition is a major part of both his life and the film's structure. Another important theme is impermanence, which ties into Lucky's rejection of a never-ending life after death. Tied to this, the issue of mortality is brought up time and again, seen most clearly in Howard's dealings with life-insurance man Bobby (Ron Livingston), preparing for his own inevitable death. However, the five yoga exercises Lucky performs each morning are the Five Rites of Rejuvenation, so although he knows that life won't last forever, so too is he doing what he can to prolong it as much as possible. With this in mind, after he falls, the film shifts gears, changing from a pseudo-comic examination of a curmudgeonly old man into a subtle analysis of the inescapability of death and the transitory nature of existence. Working together, the acting, the seemingly insignificant dialogue, the importance of routine, the crumbling town, the desert, all serve to create the whole, which conveys far more than any one aspect of the film could. This is not to say that individual scenes don't work, or are disposable, however. For example, several scenes contain achingly beautiful anecdotes; Lucky's story of accidentally killing a mockingbird as a child; Howard's narration of what he imagines President Roosevelt's birth must have been like; and, in a scene obviously paying homage to a very similar scene in The Straight Story (1999), Lucky and former marine Fred (Tom Skerritt) swapping heart-breaking stories of their time in the war (just like Lucky, Stanton was a cook on board the USS LST-970, which participated in the Battle of Okinawa). If I was to find fault, although the film avoids sentimentality for the most part, it does become a little maudlin towards the end. Additionally, by its very nature, the narrative is very episodic, which creates a slight impression of disconnection. Also, the tone and design work to keep the audience at arm's length, preventing us from becoming too emotionally involved with Lucky himself, something which I'm not entirely sure served the film, or the character, very well. However, these are relatively minor flaws in an otherwise excellent film, and in the end, this is a fitting swan song for an actor of Stanton's calibre. After all, how many people can say they've starred in their own filmic obituary?