A Man Called Sledge Reviews

  • Apr 29, 2018

    I bet Tarantino saw this before making Hateful 8 possibly because Jennifer Jason Leigh's father directed a bad ass performance from James Garner

    I bet Tarantino saw this before making Hateful 8 possibly because Jennifer Jason Leigh's father directed a bad ass performance from James Garner

  • Jul 13, 2015

    Somewhat better than I was expecting, Garner gets to play a real mean hombre - who is putting off that decision of finding a new leaf worth turning over.

    Somewhat better than I was expecting, Garner gets to play a real mean hombre - who is putting off that decision of finding a new leaf worth turning over.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Nov 13, 2014

    Luther Sledge and gang have just robbed a stagecoach in the old west. But that victory does not come without a cost, as the coach driver is accidentally killed and Sledge's partner soon after dies in a card game. None of which stops Sledge from meeting up with Ward(Dennis Weaver) and Hooker(Claude Akins) to discuss an ambitious new plan to rob a gold shipment. At the same time, there is an old man(John Marley) following them who might have some inside knowledge. "A Man Called Sledge" might not be what would one would normally expect from a typical James Garner vehicle, as this is a Spaghetti western where he plays a much more ruthless character than the charming rogues he was usually known for.(That does partially explain why the forced romantic subplot never quite gels.) That having been said, there is still plenty to admire in this entertaining and violent genre smash-up where death is a constant companion for the characters in a movie made during the sunset of the western. On the other hand, it does take the outlaws a long time to find the obvious, if very daft, solution.

    Luther Sledge and gang have just robbed a stagecoach in the old west. But that victory does not come without a cost, as the coach driver is accidentally killed and Sledge's partner soon after dies in a card game. None of which stops Sledge from meeting up with Ward(Dennis Weaver) and Hooker(Claude Akins) to discuss an ambitious new plan to rob a gold shipment. At the same time, there is an old man(John Marley) following them who might have some inside knowledge. "A Man Called Sledge" might not be what would one would normally expect from a typical James Garner vehicle, as this is a Spaghetti western where he plays a much more ruthless character than the charming rogues he was usually known for.(That does partially explain why the forced romantic subplot never quite gels.) That having been said, there is still plenty to admire in this entertaining and violent genre smash-up where death is a constant companion for the characters in a movie made during the sunset of the western. On the other hand, it does take the outlaws a long time to find the obvious, if very daft, solution.

  • Oct 14, 2014

    160327: First off, I have never been a big fan of James Garner. Even in this film, he strikes me...wrong? But, this is a pretty damn good movie. Spaghettiesque in its soundtrack, score and filming. And, there is some fantastic cinematography contained within; the most beautiful being a headshot of Laura Antonelli (Ria) about mid-way through. She's beautiful and steals from the amazing landscape. Features some fantastic western stars including Dennis Weaver, Claude Akins and John Marley; most of whom are part of Sledge's gang. The musical score is very reminiscent of Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained (2012), or should I say, Tarantino may have taken some inspiration from this film. This one surprised me and is well worth watching. A saver.

    160327: First off, I have never been a big fan of James Garner. Even in this film, he strikes me...wrong? But, this is a pretty damn good movie. Spaghettiesque in its soundtrack, score and filming. And, there is some fantastic cinematography contained within; the most beautiful being a headshot of Laura Antonelli (Ria) about mid-way through. She's beautiful and steals from the amazing landscape. Features some fantastic western stars including Dennis Weaver, Claude Akins and John Marley; most of whom are part of Sledge's gang. The musical score is very reminiscent of Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained (2012), or should I say, Tarantino may have taken some inspiration from this film. This one surprised me and is well worth watching. A saver.

  • Jul 08, 2014

    Not bad for a Spaghetti Western, terrific cast!

    Not bad for a Spaghetti Western, terrific cast!

  • May 15, 2014

    Poorly directed, with horrible theme music. At least when James Garner had the love scene with Laura Antonelli, she was not wearing the red, woolen underwear! Garner referred to that film as A MAN CALLED SLUDGE.

    Poorly directed, with horrible theme music. At least when James Garner had the love scene with Laura Antonelli, she was not wearing the red, woolen underwear! Garner referred to that film as A MAN CALLED SLUDGE.

  • Apr 13, 2014

    Always been a Garner fan, and used to enjoy The Rockford Files. I read that this movie was contrived to cash in on the spaghetti western craze of the times, albeit too little too late to be a contender. Yes, Garner is miscast as a baddie. Like Selleck he is too inherently likeable to be the villain. He's a man's man and anything less than heroism and noble deeds from him don't ring true. Nonetheless, in the role of Sledge, Garner plays a man whose moral compass veers from middle of the road to mean, murderous and muddle-headed. Not entirely evil through and through, Sledge combines natural leadership (his willing gang members keen to do his bidding), with callous disregard (as long standing saddle buddies get shot in card games or bite the dust) with the traits of fanatical greed (for more gold than you and your horse can ride off with) and being entirely loveable (according to the one and only beautiful woman in the whole wild west who has eyes only for him and waits patiently for his uncertain return). Perhaps Morrow was going for the same inscrutability of Eastwood's nameless stogie-puffing sharpshooter who more or less redeems himself along the way in the Leone series, but Sledge comes across as an implausible mix of personal traits inside a character who is such a bad guy that everyone for miles around knows him, fears him, or wants to turn him in for the price on his head. Stylistically, this movie lingers at the wrong moments on plot elements that don't warrant the airtime. An almost psychedelic cross-dissolving shot sequence conjures a crazy hot desert sun card game (apparently unquenched with either water or whiskey) which goes on long enough for one of the players to lose all his gold. All the while, a repetitive vocal soundtrack harps on about the perils of greed, the weakness of men and the allure of gold. This is a tortuous stretch of footage that makes you want to press fast forward or even eject. I held on, because even with second-rate westerns, I like to give a movie the benefit of the doubt until the bitter end. And what about the end? I would not wish to spoil it for anyone, but I think there may be some kind of morality lesson in this tale along with some personal redemption stuff, but there aren't enough other reviews to corroborate that. And it was all so very long ago now.

    Always been a Garner fan, and used to enjoy The Rockford Files. I read that this movie was contrived to cash in on the spaghetti western craze of the times, albeit too little too late to be a contender. Yes, Garner is miscast as a baddie. Like Selleck he is too inherently likeable to be the villain. He's a man's man and anything less than heroism and noble deeds from him don't ring true. Nonetheless, in the role of Sledge, Garner plays a man whose moral compass veers from middle of the road to mean, murderous and muddle-headed. Not entirely evil through and through, Sledge combines natural leadership (his willing gang members keen to do his bidding), with callous disregard (as long standing saddle buddies get shot in card games or bite the dust) with the traits of fanatical greed (for more gold than you and your horse can ride off with) and being entirely loveable (according to the one and only beautiful woman in the whole wild west who has eyes only for him and waits patiently for his uncertain return). Perhaps Morrow was going for the same inscrutability of Eastwood's nameless stogie-puffing sharpshooter who more or less redeems himself along the way in the Leone series, but Sledge comes across as an implausible mix of personal traits inside a character who is such a bad guy that everyone for miles around knows him, fears him, or wants to turn him in for the price on his head. Stylistically, this movie lingers at the wrong moments on plot elements that don't warrant the airtime. An almost psychedelic cross-dissolving shot sequence conjures a crazy hot desert sun card game (apparently unquenched with either water or whiskey) which goes on long enough for one of the players to lose all his gold. All the while, a repetitive vocal soundtrack harps on about the perils of greed, the weakness of men and the allure of gold. This is a tortuous stretch of footage that makes you want to press fast forward or even eject. I held on, because even with second-rate westerns, I like to give a movie the benefit of the doubt until the bitter end. And what about the end? I would not wish to spoil it for anyone, but I think there may be some kind of morality lesson in this tale along with some personal redemption stuff, but there aren't enough other reviews to corroborate that. And it was all so very long ago now.

  • May 12, 2013

    A western worth watching, if ya can stand the corny background music!

    A western worth watching, if ya can stand the corny background music!

  • Mar 29, 2012

    James Garner rarely, if ever, disappoints. Don't take a pass.

    James Garner rarely, if ever, disappoints. Don't take a pass.

  • Mar 12, 2012

    Pretty good western with a good cast of actors. Makes me wanna see more movies with James Garner, Dennis Weaver and Claude Akins.

    Pretty good western with a good cast of actors. Makes me wanna see more movies with James Garner, Dennis Weaver and Claude Akins.