The Offence Reviews

  • Jul 02, 2018

    This is a pretty cool old forgotten picture. sean connery is a cop who gets so pissed off that he kills the suspect. its a hell of an acting job from connery

    This is a pretty cool old forgotten picture. sean connery is a cop who gets so pissed off that he kills the suspect. its a hell of an acting job from connery

  • Aug 08, 2017

    slow and overly dramatic but Connery gives one of his best performances and that alone is worth the watch.

    slow and overly dramatic but Connery gives one of his best performances and that alone is worth the watch.

  • Jul 23, 2017

    Badly dated, very self-conscious and wordy police interrogation drama, with lots of ACTING. Connery seems uncomfortable in a part that requires both cruelty and tenderness, and Lumet directs very clunkily in grim dark exteriors that accurately reflect Britain in the early-70s. Only Ian Bannen as the snivelling suspect and Vivien Merchant as Connery's put-upon wife rise above the material.

    Badly dated, very self-conscious and wordy police interrogation drama, with lots of ACTING. Connery seems uncomfortable in a part that requires both cruelty and tenderness, and Lumet directs very clunkily in grim dark exteriors that accurately reflect Britain in the early-70s. Only Ian Bannen as the snivelling suspect and Vivien Merchant as Connery's put-upon wife rise above the material.

  • May 10, 2017

    It does not give the Lumet signature at all.

    It does not give the Lumet signature at all.

  • Aug 27, 2016

    Sidney Lumet's The Offence is an exceptionally well done, often stagy drama that, once it gets under your skin, is painfully honest and infinitely disturbing.

    Sidney Lumet's The Offence is an exceptionally well done, often stagy drama that, once it gets under your skin, is painfully honest and infinitely disturbing.

  • Jul 31, 2016

    Don't know what the hell to make of this. It thinks it's much cleverer than it actually is, and Connery is way, way out of his depth. But Lumet kind of makes it interesting, even if it's quite clearly based on a stage play. I really, I just, I have no idea.

    Don't know what the hell to make of this. It thinks it's much cleverer than it actually is, and Connery is way, way out of his depth. But Lumet kind of makes it interesting, even if it's quite clearly based on a stage play. I really, I just, I have no idea.

  • Mar 22, 2015

    One of the more obscure films that Sean Connery starred in during the 1970s. I have heard that the film was made prior to Diamonds Are Forever (1971) but released by UA internationally as part of a deal to get Connery to play James Bond again. Spoiler alert ahead but this is not a thriller but a character study despite how it might be packaged. It is adapted from a John Hopkins stage play and directed by American Sidney Lumet. Connery plays a British police detective sergeant who beats a suspected child molester to death during a routine interrogation. Connery plays the previously unflappable British cop who undergoes a nervous breakdown before our eyes with a great deal of skill, the man could act. We are never completely certain why Connery's character snaps, in a series of Rashamon-style flashbacks we get several different competing versions of the truth, from Connery's character. Was he a burned-out cop who saw too much and snapped or did he beat the suspect to purge himself of his own guilt over his hidden tendencies? Connery appears in control but glimpses of his deeply troubled psyche come out n interactions with his suffering wife (Vivien Merchant), a police inspector (Trevor Howard), and the suspect himself (Ian Bannen). Despite Connery's performance, the film is too stagey in parts and there is a lot of padding with a silent Connery stalking the streets of an unnamed British city. Its worth a look for Connery's unsettling performance, especially in his interaction with Bannen when you realize you are watching two men who both need serious psychiatric help.

    One of the more obscure films that Sean Connery starred in during the 1970s. I have heard that the film was made prior to Diamonds Are Forever (1971) but released by UA internationally as part of a deal to get Connery to play James Bond again. Spoiler alert ahead but this is not a thriller but a character study despite how it might be packaged. It is adapted from a John Hopkins stage play and directed by American Sidney Lumet. Connery plays a British police detective sergeant who beats a suspected child molester to death during a routine interrogation. Connery plays the previously unflappable British cop who undergoes a nervous breakdown before our eyes with a great deal of skill, the man could act. We are never completely certain why Connery's character snaps, in a series of Rashamon-style flashbacks we get several different competing versions of the truth, from Connery's character. Was he a burned-out cop who saw too much and snapped or did he beat the suspect to purge himself of his own guilt over his hidden tendencies? Connery appears in control but glimpses of his deeply troubled psyche come out n interactions with his suffering wife (Vivien Merchant), a police inspector (Trevor Howard), and the suspect himself (Ian Bannen). Despite Connery's performance, the film is too stagey in parts and there is a lot of padding with a silent Connery stalking the streets of an unnamed British city. Its worth a look for Connery's unsettling performance, especially in his interaction with Bannen when you realize you are watching two men who both need serious psychiatric help.

  • Mar 16, 2015

    I decided to watch this movie because Christopher Nolan said in an interview that it's one of his favorite movie. I could see that he was probably influenced by The Offence. There's the interrogation scene between Johnson and Baxter which recalls a lot the interrogation room scene between the Joker and the Batman from The Dark Knight. First of all Baxter's continuous mocking laugh recalls Joker's laugh. Then Johnson, a man of justice, must break his rules and beat to death Baxter, just like Batman almost does with Joker. Besides these "Dark Knight" similarities it's a great psychological thriller, about a man and his inside demons (Johnson). How long can a man stand all those horrors he sees daily, before he becomes insane and loses his grip? It's a depressing movie in the end. There's no happy end, you have a sense of discomfort in the end...

    I decided to watch this movie because Christopher Nolan said in an interview that it's one of his favorite movie. I could see that he was probably influenced by The Offence. There's the interrogation scene between Johnson and Baxter which recalls a lot the interrogation room scene between the Joker and the Batman from The Dark Knight. First of all Baxter's continuous mocking laugh recalls Joker's laugh. Then Johnson, a man of justice, must break his rules and beat to death Baxter, just like Batman almost does with Joker. Besides these "Dark Knight" similarities it's a great psychological thriller, about a man and his inside demons (Johnson). How long can a man stand all those horrors he sees daily, before he becomes insane and loses his grip? It's a depressing movie in the end. There's no happy end, you have a sense of discomfort in the end...

  • Dec 20, 2014

    This packed a serious punch.

    This packed a serious punch.

  • Dec 01, 2014

    The movie was very slow paced and droned on and it got boring pretty quickly, I still watched over an hr of it though, (then I had to skip to the end). Pretty disappointing movie I expected it to have a little bit more action at least. The acting was decent, but the movie itself seemed cheaply made and relied heavily on Dialogue.

    The movie was very slow paced and droned on and it got boring pretty quickly, I still watched over an hr of it though, (then I had to skip to the end). Pretty disappointing movie I expected it to have a little bit more action at least. The acting was decent, but the movie itself seemed cheaply made and relied heavily on Dialogue.