One Girl's Confession Reviews

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    Aldo G Super Reviewer
    Jul 24, 2020

    This is one of several movies Hugo Haas wrote/produced/directed with Cleo Moore. The first was Strange Fascination (which you can not find here on Rotten Tomatoes), and the formula generally the same: femme fatale leads an older man (usually Haas) to his doom. All of these films were produced for virtually no money and that hampered their appeal, but there's no question that the Haas/Moore tandem generated a certain quality that many film connoisseurs find fascinating.

    This is one of several movies Hugo Haas wrote/produced/directed with Cleo Moore. The first was Strange Fascination (which you can not find here on Rotten Tomatoes), and the formula generally the same: femme fatale leads an older man (usually Haas) to his doom. All of these films were produced for virtually no money and that hampered their appeal, but there's no question that the Haas/Moore tandem generated a certain quality that many film connoisseurs find fascinating.

  • Jul 03, 2020

    Interesting movie. CLEO MOORE was hot! Wiki sz she was a 'cult star', but why wasn't she a bigger star. Hot and good actress. She married HUEY LONG's youngest son, for a few weeks. Never heard of before saw on the Movie Channel, 7-2020 HUGO HAAS costarred again. Saw them both in another movie recently. Anyway, i think a RT rating of currently only 20 is messed up. I'm giving it 5 stars.

    Interesting movie. CLEO MOORE was hot! Wiki sz she was a 'cult star', but why wasn't she a bigger star. Hot and good actress. She married HUEY LONG's youngest son, for a few weeks. Never heard of before saw on the Movie Channel, 7-2020 HUGO HAAS costarred again. Saw them both in another movie recently. Anyway, i think a RT rating of currently only 20 is messed up. I'm giving it 5 stars.

  • Oct 31, 2015

    ok film noir from the second cycle

    ok film noir from the second cycle

  • Jan 12, 2015

    The plot may be a bit overly complicated at times, but overall this one was pretty engaging and something I might return to at a later date, knowing how the story plays out might make some of the lulls less glaring. Rental.

    The plot may be a bit overly complicated at times, but overall this one was pretty engaging and something I might return to at a later date, knowing how the story plays out might make some of the lulls less glaring. Rental.

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Jan 30, 2012

    Cleo wasn't a great actress but she had a certain something and here is quite appealing as a girl who makes a lot of wrong decisions but in her odd way is a straight shooter.

    Cleo wasn't a great actress but she had a certain something and here is quite appealing as a girl who makes a lot of wrong decisions but in her odd way is a straight shooter.

  • Nov 18, 2011

    Starring: Cleo Moore, Hugo Haas, and Glenn Langan Director: Hugo Haas Tempered by the school of hard knocks from an early age, Mary (Moore) robs $25,000 from her mobbed-up employer out of revenge for him ruining her father many years earlier. She then confesses to the theft, but never reveals where she hid the money, so she is sent to prison where she is safe from retaliation. All she has to do is serve her time and then quietly retrieve the hidden fortune once she is released. But when the kindness shown to her by a professional gambler (Haas) inspires her to share the money with him to help him out of a tight spot, and he appears to repay her by stealing the entire secreted fortune, she sets out get "her" money back or to gain revenge. I imagine that in 1953 "One Girl's Confession" had all the plot twists and reversals to keep viewers satisfied. Further, the acting is good, the cinematography is serviceable, and the direction is steady and well-focused. Personally, I think that Cleo Moore's character of Mary was a little too quick to develop such trust in Hugo Haas' character given her background, but if one accepts the idea that she was just a little girl at heart looking for decent father-esque figure. But nearly seventy years later, the film's story comes across as feeling too straight-forward, too pat, and under-developed. When watching it, there are numerous complications that seem to be set up as the story unfolds, but which are brought to fruition. The mob angle is dealt with kinda-sorta, but it feels too easy for someone watching the film in 2011, and there are a couple of characters that are just begging to be revealed as duplicitous or as something other than what they appear to be on the surface. But, without spoiling anything, I can tell you that whatever twists you THINK might be coming, you'll only get a tiny fraction of the proverbial "storm" can one would expect to come down on Mary's head as she moves to collect the money she's "worked for." Now, the plot twists that do materialize are all well-executed, and the signature "ironic twists" in a Hugo Haas picture are here in spades, but as "The End" flashed on the screen, I was left feeling like I'd somehow been short-changed. This isn't exactly a bad movie, it's just a little tame. I suppose it might be a nice, light-weight introduction to the film noir genre if you have a 11-14 year-old girl in your household with a love of crime fiction and mysteries (and the same might be true of a boy, but I think it might be less likely), but I think time has left this movie behind as entertainment for adults. I'd move to hear other opinions, though.

    Starring: Cleo Moore, Hugo Haas, and Glenn Langan Director: Hugo Haas Tempered by the school of hard knocks from an early age, Mary (Moore) robs $25,000 from her mobbed-up employer out of revenge for him ruining her father many years earlier. She then confesses to the theft, but never reveals where she hid the money, so she is sent to prison where she is safe from retaliation. All she has to do is serve her time and then quietly retrieve the hidden fortune once she is released. But when the kindness shown to her by a professional gambler (Haas) inspires her to share the money with him to help him out of a tight spot, and he appears to repay her by stealing the entire secreted fortune, she sets out get "her" money back or to gain revenge. I imagine that in 1953 "One Girl's Confession" had all the plot twists and reversals to keep viewers satisfied. Further, the acting is good, the cinematography is serviceable, and the direction is steady and well-focused. Personally, I think that Cleo Moore's character of Mary was a little too quick to develop such trust in Hugo Haas' character given her background, but if one accepts the idea that she was just a little girl at heart looking for decent father-esque figure. But nearly seventy years later, the film's story comes across as feeling too straight-forward, too pat, and under-developed. When watching it, there are numerous complications that seem to be set up as the story unfolds, but which are brought to fruition. The mob angle is dealt with kinda-sorta, but it feels too easy for someone watching the film in 2011, and there are a couple of characters that are just begging to be revealed as duplicitous or as something other than what they appear to be on the surface. But, without spoiling anything, I can tell you that whatever twists you THINK might be coming, you'll only get a tiny fraction of the proverbial "storm" can one would expect to come down on Mary's head as she moves to collect the money she's "worked for." Now, the plot twists that do materialize are all well-executed, and the signature "ironic twists" in a Hugo Haas picture are here in spades, but as "The End" flashed on the screen, I was left feeling like I'd somehow been short-changed. This isn't exactly a bad movie, it's just a little tame. I suppose it might be a nice, light-weight introduction to the film noir genre if you have a 11-14 year-old girl in your household with a love of crime fiction and mysteries (and the same might be true of a boy, but I think it might be less likely), but I think time has left this movie behind as entertainment for adults. I'd move to hear other opinions, though.

  • Apr 25, 2010

    An entertaining "fate and irony" noir from director Hugo Haas, starring Cleo Moore as a mistreated waitress who steals $25,000 from her corrupt boss and turns herself in for the crime but refuses to tell the authorities where she hid the money. After she gets out of prison, her fate with the money proves complicated and leads to an ironic but happy ending.

    An entertaining "fate and irony" noir from director Hugo Haas, starring Cleo Moore as a mistreated waitress who steals $25,000 from her corrupt boss and turns herself in for the crime but refuses to tell the authorities where she hid the money. After she gets out of prison, her fate with the money proves complicated and leads to an ironic but happy ending.