Open Hearts (Elsker Dig For Evigt) Reviews

  • Oct 12, 2016

    Genuine emotions and superb acting. I'd call it an expert european acting.

    Genuine emotions and superb acting. I'd call it an expert european acting.

  • May 06, 2016

    One of the best anti love stories ever made.

    One of the best anti love stories ever made.

  • Aug 15, 2015

    I have seen so many Dogme films but I can wholeheartedly say that Open Hearts "Elsker dig for evigt" (2002) is my favorite and the closest to my heart. Cecilie (Sonja Ritcher) is a cook in her early twenties who is deeply in love with and also recently engaged to Joachim (Nikolaj Lie Kaas). Their relationship is put to test when Joachim becomes paralyzed for life after a car accident. The woman who was driving the car (Paprika Steen) feels obliged to help the couple and pushes her husband Niels (Mads Mikkelsen) to comfort Cecilie, unaware of the devastating outcome.. Niels falls in love with Cecilie. The thing about Dogme films is that they are capable of putting you in a very close position to the characters, almost in a crude way. Susanne Bier uses this honesty to gently place us inside the most closed space: the human psyche. Open Hearts does not just slam you with naked reality and intimate details - it does not want to shock you like most Dogme films, it takes you gently by the hand and allows you the same amount of confusion and indeterminateness the characters are feeling. And it does that equally; you can never blame any of the four protagonists even in their lowest moments because it is raw human emotions they are showing and simultaneously you are experiencing. The film could leave you melancholic or hopeful, it depends on how you see it, but what I am well sure of is that it will give you no closure, no answers, no relief of any kind - and this is so heartbreaking, just like life itself. It puts you in direct contact with the awful/beautiful fact that despite its intensity and realness sometimes, all the spectrum of human emotions is transient. My eyes teared up at the end of the film, not because I felt sorry for anyone or anything, but because I felt betrayed by the film's stark honesty. I wanted an ending to this emotional mess I have witnessed/experienced and instead I was left clueless and disillusioned in the middle of nowhere. Okay, enough with this subjective philosophical rambling. Let's talk about some technical aspects. Although Bier breaks away with some of the Dogme rules, I thought the use of Super-8 camera to show short fantasy sequences is a brilliant touch to take you a few steps away from reality and bring you even closer to the characters. Anders Thomas Jensen's script is gripping and flows effortlessly even when characters do not say a word, which leads us to the carefully chosen and amazing cast. I personally think that a great deal of the genius of the performance in this film comes from Bier herself and the kind of free yet intimate atmosphere she has provided for her actors. She does not aim at getting the best angles or making them look attractive, she only allows them the freedom to be themselves no matter how that would look like.

    I have seen so many Dogme films but I can wholeheartedly say that Open Hearts "Elsker dig for evigt" (2002) is my favorite and the closest to my heart. Cecilie (Sonja Ritcher) is a cook in her early twenties who is deeply in love with and also recently engaged to Joachim (Nikolaj Lie Kaas). Their relationship is put to test when Joachim becomes paralyzed for life after a car accident. The woman who was driving the car (Paprika Steen) feels obliged to help the couple and pushes her husband Niels (Mads Mikkelsen) to comfort Cecilie, unaware of the devastating outcome.. Niels falls in love with Cecilie. The thing about Dogme films is that they are capable of putting you in a very close position to the characters, almost in a crude way. Susanne Bier uses this honesty to gently place us inside the most closed space: the human psyche. Open Hearts does not just slam you with naked reality and intimate details - it does not want to shock you like most Dogme films, it takes you gently by the hand and allows you the same amount of confusion and indeterminateness the characters are feeling. And it does that equally; you can never blame any of the four protagonists even in their lowest moments because it is raw human emotions they are showing and simultaneously you are experiencing. The film could leave you melancholic or hopeful, it depends on how you see it, but what I am well sure of is that it will give you no closure, no answers, no relief of any kind - and this is so heartbreaking, just like life itself. It puts you in direct contact with the awful/beautiful fact that despite its intensity and realness sometimes, all the spectrum of human emotions is transient. My eyes teared up at the end of the film, not because I felt sorry for anyone or anything, but because I felt betrayed by the film's stark honesty. I wanted an ending to this emotional mess I have witnessed/experienced and instead I was left clueless and disillusioned in the middle of nowhere. Okay, enough with this subjective philosophical rambling. Let's talk about some technical aspects. Although Bier breaks away with some of the Dogme rules, I thought the use of Super-8 camera to show short fantasy sequences is a brilliant touch to take you a few steps away from reality and bring you even closer to the characters. Anders Thomas Jensen's script is gripping and flows effortlessly even when characters do not say a word, which leads us to the carefully chosen and amazing cast. I personally think that a great deal of the genius of the performance in this film comes from Bier herself and the kind of free yet intimate atmosphere she has provided for her actors. She does not aim at getting the best angles or making them look attractive, she only allows them the freedom to be themselves no matter how that would look like.

  • Jan 15, 2015

    One of the best Dogma films (The Celebration would top it) with its captivating story and strong performances. An excellent romantic drama!

    One of the best Dogma films (The Celebration would top it) with its captivating story and strong performances. An excellent romantic drama!

  • Jan 11, 2015

    Everything about this movie makes me angry. It is devastating and sad and so raw.

    Everything about this movie makes me angry. It is devastating and sad and so raw.

  • Edgar C Super Reviewer
    Sep 05, 2014

    Featuring one of the best improvised slaps to the cheek in cinema history(?), Susanne Bier, famous for her Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award of <i>In a Better World</i> (2010), and prolific writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen, who won an Acadey Award as well for his bold satyrical commentary on racism in <i>Valgaften</i> (1999), <i>Elsker dig for evigt</i> (approximately translated as "Love You Forever") is a powerful melodrama about love and mixed up relationships. Think of the Dogme 95 style meeting Michael Winterbottom's early minimalist melodrama and the topics of a Rohmer's Moral Tale. The result might sound as a rare mixture but, if analyzed correctly, all those three elements have pretty much many things in common. When thinking of this film, I think of that mixture and realize that such combination was a good idea for contemporary cinema. I have said it hundreds of times and I shall repeat it again: men cannot have the artistic sensibility of a woman. Bier displays events from a neutral point of view and, under Jensen's writing, orchestrates the conditions necessary for making everybody to suffer, whether they had it coming or not, but with a purpose of personal learning or growth. Joachim becomes a character meant to make us reflect on the extent to which we can sympathize with a hateable person despite his horrific circumstances. He is an invitation for the viewer to be able to comprehend the suffering of others, but without justifying a self-destructive attitude that backfires on others as well. Cecilie is a rather idealized depiction of the woman with a broken heart and her resulting conflict to define the term "love" properly, organizing her feelings in the process. My main issue is that she is one of the main characters, and yet does not show any real transformation. She is left like this tender, idealized embodiment of internal conflict. Even if the ending suggested a change, her acting didn't mirror that. Niels, played by the awesome and now famous Mads Mikkelsen, is a man showcasing this awfully difficult trade-off between professionalism, unfaithfulness and being a family man. Oh yes, it's the same story being told for the 700th time, but it is about how you retell the same story, and not about telling a new story. His character shows complexity between layers of empathy and calmness, hidden behind a doctor's robe and his seemingly friendly bespectacled physiognomy. His transformation is probably the most important (and impressively delivered) of them all. Although it starts with clichés flourishing everywhere and an increasing red alert of melodrama and sensationalism, Bier and co. utilize the preceding events for giving them a unique turn under the subtle and invasive lens of the Dogme 95 rules and prepares valuable lessons for everybody involved, no matter how unfair they might seem, because that's life. Although, again, whatever happened to Cecilie internally is completely lost to me. Her character is the biggest flaw of a very talented and powerful melodramatic film. 83/100

    Featuring one of the best improvised slaps to the cheek in cinema history(?), Susanne Bier, famous for her Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award of <i>In a Better World</i> (2010), and prolific writer and director Anders Thomas Jensen, who won an Acadey Award as well for his bold satyrical commentary on racism in <i>Valgaften</i> (1999), <i>Elsker dig for evigt</i> (approximately translated as "Love You Forever") is a powerful melodrama about love and mixed up relationships. Think of the Dogme 95 style meeting Michael Winterbottom's early minimalist melodrama and the topics of a Rohmer's Moral Tale. The result might sound as a rare mixture but, if analyzed correctly, all those three elements have pretty much many things in common. When thinking of this film, I think of that mixture and realize that such combination was a good idea for contemporary cinema. I have said it hundreds of times and I shall repeat it again: men cannot have the artistic sensibility of a woman. Bier displays events from a neutral point of view and, under Jensen's writing, orchestrates the conditions necessary for making everybody to suffer, whether they had it coming or not, but with a purpose of personal learning or growth. Joachim becomes a character meant to make us reflect on the extent to which we can sympathize with a hateable person despite his horrific circumstances. He is an invitation for the viewer to be able to comprehend the suffering of others, but without justifying a self-destructive attitude that backfires on others as well. Cecilie is a rather idealized depiction of the woman with a broken heart and her resulting conflict to define the term "love" properly, organizing her feelings in the process. My main issue is that she is one of the main characters, and yet does not show any real transformation. She is left like this tender, idealized embodiment of internal conflict. Even if the ending suggested a change, her acting didn't mirror that. Niels, played by the awesome and now famous Mads Mikkelsen, is a man showcasing this awfully difficult trade-off between professionalism, unfaithfulness and being a family man. Oh yes, it's the same story being told for the 700th time, but it is about how you retell the same story, and not about telling a new story. His character shows complexity between layers of empathy and calmness, hidden behind a doctor's robe and his seemingly friendly bespectacled physiognomy. His transformation is probably the most important (and impressively delivered) of them all. Although it starts with clichés flourishing everywhere and an increasing red alert of melodrama and sensationalism, Bier and co. utilize the preceding events for giving them a unique turn under the subtle and invasive lens of the Dogme 95 rules and prepares valuable lessons for everybody involved, no matter how unfair they might seem, because that's life. Although, again, whatever happened to Cecilie internally is completely lost to me. Her character is the biggest flaw of a very talented and powerful melodramatic film. 83/100

  • Aug 20, 2014

    great story,dialogue,filming, and performances..

    great story,dialogue,filming, and performances..

  • Jul 21, 2013

    My God was this film painful. I was literally crying at the end. It was beautiful and the acting...ugh I just...Mads Mikkelsen is wonderful and definitely in my top 5 favorite actors, but I think this might be in the top 2 movies I've seen him do. It was such an emotional and raw experience as a viewer and I love Dogme films anyway, but this is up there in that category as well. 10/10 flawless film.

    My God was this film painful. I was literally crying at the end. It was beautiful and the acting...ugh I just...Mads Mikkelsen is wonderful and definitely in my top 5 favorite actors, but I think this might be in the top 2 movies I've seen him do. It was such an emotional and raw experience as a viewer and I love Dogme films anyway, but this is up there in that category as well. 10/10 flawless film.

  • Jun 25, 2013

    Dogme movement (1995-2005) is a terra incognita for me, although now it has officially existed only as a terminology thanks to the ubiquitous evasion of shooting on location with any cellphones or other handheld lighter gizmos, and its spirit has been ingested by more advanced mutants (e.g. mumblecore). But Susanne Bier is not merely a Dogme enthusiast, AFTER THE WEDDING (2006 7/10) is a redoubtable relationship dissection and OPEN HEARTS (the new Hannibal Mads Mikkelsen star in both films) treads the same territory to examine the complexity of humans' conundrum between desire and responsibility, ethics and emotions. Two couples, one is engaged, another has 3 children, a car accident (not entirely abides by the Dogme rules though) turns their worlds upside down, a threat is common-or-garden both in the cinematic and real world; the life-changing mishap prompts an adultery between a middle class doctor and the disheartened fiancée, whose fiancé undergoes a permanent quadriplegia from the car accident where the doctor's wife is the offender. The face-fixated close-ups extensively put those characters under scrutiny for their rational and irrational behaviors, natural light commingles with saturated palette (during the beginning and the ending) and a black & white lens of the blurry and grainy illusory fancy. The cast is sterling, a quartet of tug-of-war from Mikkelsen, Richter, Lie Kass and Steen, a humdrum-weary family man holds his seven-year-itch infatuation to a damsel-in-distress; a comfort-seeker with abiding guilt of abandoning her bed-ridden fiancé; a young paralyzer who ruthlessly deserts his fiancée for his incompetence as a proper man but still hankers for her company; a wife is rueful of her road rage and its tragic repercussions, suddenly devastated by her husband's utter betrayal; Steen's impromptu slapping and Mikkelsen's reaction are among the best on-screen intensified scenes I have even seen, three of the four leads end up in my yearly top 10 list (guess who narrowly missed the spot?). But on the other hand, the melodramatic core of the story hobbles a soul-searching catharsis and empathetic introspection which would put the film onto an upper notch, Bier and DP Morten Søborg's camera is erratic but not dizzily shaky, the fly-on-the-wall intimacy allows us to take a much closer look at the symptoms and the cause of the frailty resides in every soul on earth, and offers us staying in a paralleled world, munches with palliative pills to ease our own troubles.

    Dogme movement (1995-2005) is a terra incognita for me, although now it has officially existed only as a terminology thanks to the ubiquitous evasion of shooting on location with any cellphones or other handheld lighter gizmos, and its spirit has been ingested by more advanced mutants (e.g. mumblecore). But Susanne Bier is not merely a Dogme enthusiast, AFTER THE WEDDING (2006 7/10) is a redoubtable relationship dissection and OPEN HEARTS (the new Hannibal Mads Mikkelsen star in both films) treads the same territory to examine the complexity of humans' conundrum between desire and responsibility, ethics and emotions. Two couples, one is engaged, another has 3 children, a car accident (not entirely abides by the Dogme rules though) turns their worlds upside down, a threat is common-or-garden both in the cinematic and real world; the life-changing mishap prompts an adultery between a middle class doctor and the disheartened fiancée, whose fiancé undergoes a permanent quadriplegia from the car accident where the doctor's wife is the offender. The face-fixated close-ups extensively put those characters under scrutiny for their rational and irrational behaviors, natural light commingles with saturated palette (during the beginning and the ending) and a black & white lens of the blurry and grainy illusory fancy. The cast is sterling, a quartet of tug-of-war from Mikkelsen, Richter, Lie Kass and Steen, a humdrum-weary family man holds his seven-year-itch infatuation to a damsel-in-distress; a comfort-seeker with abiding guilt of abandoning her bed-ridden fiancé; a young paralyzer who ruthlessly deserts his fiancée for his incompetence as a proper man but still hankers for her company; a wife is rueful of her road rage and its tragic repercussions, suddenly devastated by her husband's utter betrayal; Steen's impromptu slapping and Mikkelsen's reaction are among the best on-screen intensified scenes I have even seen, three of the four leads end up in my yearly top 10 list (guess who narrowly missed the spot?). But on the other hand, the melodramatic core of the story hobbles a soul-searching catharsis and empathetic introspection which would put the film onto an upper notch, Bier and DP Morten Søborg's camera is erratic but not dizzily shaky, the fly-on-the-wall intimacy allows us to take a much closer look at the symptoms and the cause of the frailty resides in every soul on earth, and offers us staying in a paralleled world, munches with palliative pills to ease our own troubles.

  • May 28, 2013

    raw and painfully honest. a movie that's gonna stuck in your head for a day or two. also the first dogma movie i've ever seen

    raw and painfully honest. a movie that's gonna stuck in your head for a day or two. also the first dogma movie i've ever seen