Ossessione Reviews

  • May 12, 2020

    A definite Neorealism Italian film and actually one to be considered the first one and for those who don't know Italian Neorealism is film movement characterized by stories set amongst the poor and the working class, filmed on location, frequently using non-professional actors. Which gives it a more Real feeling when it comes to the acting, cinematography was kinda cheesy at times but I've seen worse and overall just a movie some recommended to watch and I didn't like as much as the other ones I've seen Overall plot, Guy likes a married women whose husband owns a restaurant, they conspire to kill live almost happily ever after.

    A definite Neorealism Italian film and actually one to be considered the first one and for those who don't know Italian Neorealism is film movement characterized by stories set amongst the poor and the working class, filmed on location, frequently using non-professional actors. Which gives it a more Real feeling when it comes to the acting, cinematography was kinda cheesy at times but I've seen worse and overall just a movie some recommended to watch and I didn't like as much as the other ones I've seen Overall plot, Guy likes a married women whose husband owns a restaurant, they conspire to kill live almost happily ever after.

  • Dec 17, 2019

    The simple cinematography is perfect for the poor Italian situation, but excluding the neorealism's setting, the tragic Italian situation and the historical importance, the movie itself is less compelling than expected

    The simple cinematography is perfect for the poor Italian situation, but excluding the neorealism's setting, the tragic Italian situation and the historical importance, the movie itself is less compelling than expected

  • Jun 03, 2018

    This is a third adaptation of the novel that I've seen and I liked its Italian flavour, it also serves as a very strong debut and the starting point of Luchino Visconti's career. It is deliciously shot in a stark black-and-white, a sort of Italian noir.

    This is a third adaptation of the novel that I've seen and I liked its Italian flavour, it also serves as a very strong debut and the starting point of Luchino Visconti's career. It is deliciously shot in a stark black-and-white, a sort of Italian noir.

  • Jan 15, 2018

    1001 movies to see before you die. The Italian take on "The Postman Always Rings Twice". Well made and culturally unique.

    1001 movies to see before you die. The Italian take on "The Postman Always Rings Twice". Well made and culturally unique.

  • Aug 27, 2017

    Quality movie about a man and a married woman falling in love and the tragic that follows. Modern viewers have seen this same story many times, but not many films have managed to tell it as well. Great work all in all.

    Quality movie about a man and a married woman falling in love and the tragic that follows. Modern viewers have seen this same story many times, but not many films have managed to tell it as well. Great work all in all.

  • Mar 09, 2017

    The longing of a young beautiful woman for proper love, aged tenfold by a brilliant shot of her slouched over in a corner chair, shadow hitting the wall. Massimo Girotti's attitude as Gino is perfect - when the husband Giuseppe calls for him to eat as he plays harmonica, we can feel his thoughts of not wanting to respond to this old fat man in the way of his love. Terrific, possible foreshadow framing of razor over Giuseppe. Beautiful transition when the artist blows his match out next to Gino in bed. Though it's not a razor Gino ends up killing him with, it is murder that he commits, and ultimately haunts his relationship. They seemed trapped, as if by karmic forces from the past, in a forbidden love. Giovanna is encountering the same problem in Gino she had with her husband, him talking about her like she's not there, framed against an impressionist dusk shot of the river. She walks into a kitchen full of unmanageable dirty dishes, and she just starts eating - no cleaning will get done tonight, she falls asleep. The hotter younger girl Anita comes back to her room finding Gino waiting, carrying a bottle of milk. When we cut back to Giovanna, she seems less and less attractive in her funerary garb, doing disgusting things like blowing her nose at the table, stalking insecurely, obsessively. The ending is absolutely perfect, a cruel twist of fate coming full circle. We started the film inside the truck, driving along a clear path towards the Bragana home,Gino in the back of he truck sneaking his way into this world. Now Gino is escaping it as the driver, obscured by exhaust from the truck in front of him, on the run from everything but unable to get past. In between this framework is a third incident with the truck, the murder of Giuseppe off a levee. Now everything collides as Gino tries to pass, an attempt to escape from the truth they're both running from. Giovanna suffers the cruel fate of death, and Gino will be stuck as an imprisoned murderer for the rest of his life - there is no escape after the truck is knocked off the levee trying to pass. Karma is a bitch.

    The longing of a young beautiful woman for proper love, aged tenfold by a brilliant shot of her slouched over in a corner chair, shadow hitting the wall. Massimo Girotti's attitude as Gino is perfect - when the husband Giuseppe calls for him to eat as he plays harmonica, we can feel his thoughts of not wanting to respond to this old fat man in the way of his love. Terrific, possible foreshadow framing of razor over Giuseppe. Beautiful transition when the artist blows his match out next to Gino in bed. Though it's not a razor Gino ends up killing him with, it is murder that he commits, and ultimately haunts his relationship. They seemed trapped, as if by karmic forces from the past, in a forbidden love. Giovanna is encountering the same problem in Gino she had with her husband, him talking about her like she's not there, framed against an impressionist dusk shot of the river. She walks into a kitchen full of unmanageable dirty dishes, and she just starts eating - no cleaning will get done tonight, she falls asleep. The hotter younger girl Anita comes back to her room finding Gino waiting, carrying a bottle of milk. When we cut back to Giovanna, she seems less and less attractive in her funerary garb, doing disgusting things like blowing her nose at the table, stalking insecurely, obsessively. The ending is absolutely perfect, a cruel twist of fate coming full circle. We started the film inside the truck, driving along a clear path towards the Bragana home,Gino in the back of he truck sneaking his way into this world. Now Gino is escaping it as the driver, obscured by exhaust from the truck in front of him, on the run from everything but unable to get past. In between this framework is a third incident with the truck, the murder of Giuseppe off a levee. Now everything collides as Gino tries to pass, an attempt to escape from the truth they're both running from. Giovanna suffers the cruel fate of death, and Gino will be stuck as an imprisoned murderer for the rest of his life - there is no escape after the truck is knocked off the levee trying to pass. Karma is a bitch.

  • George M Super Reviewer
    Jun 23, 2016

    Visconti's first film is a marvellous fatalistic work that goes beyond the crime thriller genre conventions it employes to tell its story. It is an adaptation of Cain's novel The Postman Always Rings Twice, but unlike the more straightforward adaptations of the film by Hollywood, it manages to go much deeper in character development and social commentary. It also manages to create an aesthetic quality that anticipates neorealism and enriches the plot with details that give the film a slower pace but elevate the story's themes to existential sophistication. Notably, the additional sub-plot with the 'Spaniard', apart from the possible homo-erotic elements, gives to Gino (Massimo Girotti) a dillema between two ways of life: bohemian freedom and an almost christian loving of others in need (he buy's Gino a ticket for free) on the one hand, and Giovanna's conformist worldview that seeks money and a place to stay on the other. However, Visconti never judges his characters in a moralizing manner. The wonderful and raw performances by Massimo Girotti and Clara Calamai help a lot in creating such believable characters and not simply one-dimensional cliches such as those we can see a lot in later Hollywood film noirs. Here there is no femme fatale, who plots in the darkness like a spider; Giovanna is simply a woman. Her machinations are simplistic and flawed and she tries hard to keep the relationship going after the murder. For example, Visconti cleverly never tells us whether she really knew whether her husband had a life-insurance. Thus, he deliberately passes a chance to make her the mastermind that played Gino for a fool. She has also some touching moments like when she eats in the kitchen alone, reading the newspaper befor falling asleep. Visconti even gives some metaphysical touches in the film, like in the scene where the husband goes outside to kill some noisy cats, while the wind is blowing and the lovers are hugging secretly. It is wonderful seeing a director finding a voice with his first film. It is a classic; it feels modern and hasn't aged (apart from some conventions like the panning of camera as a seexual metaphor and such). On the contrary, sometimes it feels more raw than new films; and yet it remains poetic and humanistic deep down.

    Visconti's first film is a marvellous fatalistic work that goes beyond the crime thriller genre conventions it employes to tell its story. It is an adaptation of Cain's novel The Postman Always Rings Twice, but unlike the more straightforward adaptations of the film by Hollywood, it manages to go much deeper in character development and social commentary. It also manages to create an aesthetic quality that anticipates neorealism and enriches the plot with details that give the film a slower pace but elevate the story's themes to existential sophistication. Notably, the additional sub-plot with the 'Spaniard', apart from the possible homo-erotic elements, gives to Gino (Massimo Girotti) a dillema between two ways of life: bohemian freedom and an almost christian loving of others in need (he buy's Gino a ticket for free) on the one hand, and Giovanna's conformist worldview that seeks money and a place to stay on the other. However, Visconti never judges his characters in a moralizing manner. The wonderful and raw performances by Massimo Girotti and Clara Calamai help a lot in creating such believable characters and not simply one-dimensional cliches such as those we can see a lot in later Hollywood film noirs. Here there is no femme fatale, who plots in the darkness like a spider; Giovanna is simply a woman. Her machinations are simplistic and flawed and she tries hard to keep the relationship going after the murder. For example, Visconti cleverly never tells us whether she really knew whether her husband had a life-insurance. Thus, he deliberately passes a chance to make her the mastermind that played Gino for a fool. She has also some touching moments like when she eats in the kitchen alone, reading the newspaper befor falling asleep. Visconti even gives some metaphysical touches in the film, like in the scene where the husband goes outside to kill some noisy cats, while the wind is blowing and the lovers are hugging secretly. It is wonderful seeing a director finding a voice with his first film. It is a classic; it feels modern and hasn't aged (apart from some conventions like the panning of camera as a seexual metaphor and such). On the contrary, sometimes it feels more raw than new films; and yet it remains poetic and humanistic deep down.

  • Oct 06, 2014

    A masterful treatment of James Caine's 'The Postman Always Rings Twice' which was based on the Ruth Snyder - Judd Gray murder in 1927... A Masterpiece saved--A daring debut, fusing melodrama, film-noir, and a realistic approach creating The Earliest Attempt at Neo-Realism... You could watch it ten times and still delight in its nuances!!

    A masterful treatment of James Caine's 'The Postman Always Rings Twice' which was based on the Ruth Snyder - Judd Gray murder in 1927... A Masterpiece saved--A daring debut, fusing melodrama, film-noir, and a realistic approach creating The Earliest Attempt at Neo-Realism... You could watch it ten times and still delight in its nuances!!

  • Jun 19, 2014

    A double-bill of two vintage films adapted from James M. Cain's 1934 novel THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RING TWICE, 1946's Hollywood B&W version and Visconti's groundbreaking debut in 1943, while intentionally evade the less-championed 1981 remake with Nicholson and Lange. read rest of my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1mW

    A double-bill of two vintage films adapted from James M. Cain's 1934 novel THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RING TWICE, 1946's Hollywood B&W version and Visconti's groundbreaking debut in 1943, while intentionally evade the less-championed 1981 remake with Nicholson and Lange. read rest of my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-1mW

  • Oct 14, 2013

    Luchino Visconti is groundbreaking for initiating the Italian neo-realist movement by adapting the famous American novel into this Italian based film, and courageous to achieve this under the Fascist oppression. Featuring the beautiful Italian scenery, Ossessione focused more on the tragedy, rather than the ironical condemnation on morality in the original novel Perhaps this is why it becomes of a neo-realist pioneer, right?

    Luchino Visconti is groundbreaking for initiating the Italian neo-realist movement by adapting the famous American novel into this Italian based film, and courageous to achieve this under the Fascist oppression. Featuring the beautiful Italian scenery, Ossessione focused more on the tragedy, rather than the ironical condemnation on morality in the original novel Perhaps this is why it becomes of a neo-realist pioneer, right?