Pin

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58%

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User Ratings: 3,361
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Movie Info

The title character in the Canadian Pin isn't a who but a what: a transparent medical teaching dummy. Pin is owned by doctor Terrance O'Quinn, who with the help of ventriloquism uses the dummy to transmit delicate facts of life to his children. O'Quinn's son David Hewlett loves Pin as much as anyone can love an inanimate object--until he witnesses his father's nurse simulating a sex act with the dummy. This traumatic experience is the first step in Hewlett's mental and emotional disintegration. The film then ventures in Psycho territory, so perhaps it's best not to reveal any more.

Cast

David Hewlett
as Leon Linden
Cynthia Preston
as Ursula Linden
Terry O'Quinn
as Dr. Linden
Bronwen Mantel
as Mrs. Linden
John Ferguson
as Sam Fraker
Jacob Tierney
as Leon, Age 7
Bronwen Nantel
as Mrs. Linden
Jacob Tirney
as Leon, age 7
Michelle Anderson
as Ursula...Age 5
Steve Bernarski
as Leon...Age 13
Katie Shengler
as Ursula...Age 11
Helene Udy
as Marcia Bateman
Patricia Collins
as Aunt Dorothy
David Gow
as Officer Wilson
Joanna Noyes
as Mrs. Henry
Bruce Ramsay
as Teenager
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Critic Reviews for Pin

All Critics (2) | Fresh (1) | Rotten (1)

Audience Reviews for Pin

  • Dec 07, 2013
    A psychosexual horror thriller about an anatomically correct anatomy medical dummy should be loads of tacky fun. In the hands of Sandor Stern's stolid direction we get a thriller melodrama that is a crossbreed of Psycho and Magic with the syrupy sheen of a made for TV Hallmark film. Based on the novel by Andrew Neiderman (who also wrote "John Grisham meets The Omen" thriller Devil's Advocate, which itself was loosely readapted for film as an Al Pacino blackly comic ham-fest), Pin tells the story of Ursula (Preston) and Leon (Hewlett), raised in quiet suburban seclusion by their father Dr Linden (O'Quinn) and mother (Mantel). Dr Linden has a facility with ventriloquism which he uses to give a voice and character to Pin, the anatomist dummy in his office. By turns enrapturing his children and using Pin as a means of bestowing wisdom and lessons, all is well. However, as the Linden children grew up, Ursula may have developed a taste for parties and teenage sexual encounters, but Leon has grown an unhealthy attachment to Pin that may spark into tragedy. The loss of identity and split personality themes fit the thriller genre like a glove; De Palma has pretty much made a career out of it. Pin may tread well worn ground, but it does develop its characters and has a genuine air of melancholy. This is a movie where the writing is much better than the direction. Stern is an old hand at television and in this, his only cinema release, he doesn't transcend the medium; the whole movie feels shackled. It politely mumbles itself through such queasy scenes as Leon witnessing his own sisters abortion performed by their father, and the increasingly unhealthy sibling relationship is too discreet, as if in fear of losing a TV sponsor. Ursula may also be the most wholesome good time girl in all of cinema; when Stern does embrace bad taste with a scene involving a nurse having sex with Pin (which implies he's anatomically correct in all the right places) we get a hint of the febrile psychosexual delight this could have been. Its failings as a horror movie are also what differentiates it from most of its ilk. By empathizing so deeply with Leon it stages events as tragedy, a gradual erosion of the person with every act he commits, rather than horror set piece. Leon may be doing monstrous things but he is never viewed as a monster. The performances are all uniformly good, although O'Quinn has a hard time removing the shackles of The Stepfather, his doctor father here seeming just a little too sinister. In the end this is a tragedy hiding in horror clothing, a film ending on a grace note of sadness rather than winking at a possible sequel. You just wish it was directed with a little more brio. Like its lead actress, it wants to be slutty but is a little too Laura Ashley for its own good. (Review by Jason Abbey)
    The Movie W Super Reviewer
  • Nov 22, 2013
    Psychological horror films are often hard to accomplish. The reason is that they have to manipulate your mind in such a way that you are genuinely afraid of what's going on on-screen. With Pin, you get exactly that, this is one of the finest examples of what psychological horror films should be. With a great cast of actors, Pin is a bone chilling film that will grab your attention from start to finish. The film boasts a very good cast and terrifying moments. This is a brilliant execution in the genre, and the psychological aspect of the movie really does stand out because the lead actor who plays Leon is so convincing. The film has some tense moments of sheer terror and it goes deep into your conscience. Leon is a paranoid Schizophrenic who thinks that Pin, an anatomically correct dummy is alive and he uses it to control his sister. The film is simple, but it's effective in showing the downfall of mental illness when it goes untreated and the result is terrifying. I was pleasantly surprised with the film, and it is one of the finest of the psychological horror genre of film. The cast are very good here, and the story is engaging, thrilling and it always leaves you on the edge of your seat. To any genre fan looking for a well crafted horror film, Pin is definitely a fine choice. This film goes deep in the human psychosis, which adds to the terror that unfolds on-screen. Now is this a masterpiece, it isn't, but it definitely one of the finer examples of psychological horror done right.
    Alex r Super Reviewer
  • Sep 06, 2010
    This horror movie is predictable and not really scary at all. It may be slightly creepy at times, but that's it. I wouldn't recommend this movie, but it's not too bad, it's so-so.
    Aj V Super Reviewer
  • Jan 14, 2010
    I caught this movie in a list about great horror movies you've never seen, however, after watching this movie I was unimpressed; it is a interesting slow burn psychological thrillers that is mildly creepy and at times bizarre but "Pin", in my opinion, it is not a great film as stated in that list only a decent horror flick. Remake is in work by the same director.
    John M Super Reviewer

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