The Prince of Tides Reviews

  • Jun 07, 2020

    This does not age well at all. Random and segmented voice overs, a random sports training sequence, a very bad hair bleach job, 90% of the film is Nick Nolte screaming in Streisand's face... and the second half of the film is just a prolonged sex scene that has 0 sex appeal, accompanied by a saccharine soundtrack and random panoramas. This film could have been interesting if it focused on the actual screen-worthy aspects of this story, rather than a forced love affair between two characters no one really cares about. The only worthy aspect of this film are Streisand's outfits.

    This does not age well at all. Random and segmented voice overs, a random sports training sequence, a very bad hair bleach job, 90% of the film is Nick Nolte screaming in Streisand's face... and the second half of the film is just a prolonged sex scene that has 0 sex appeal, accompanied by a saccharine soundtrack and random panoramas. This film could have been interesting if it focused on the actual screen-worthy aspects of this story, rather than a forced love affair between two characters no one really cares about. The only worthy aspect of this film are Streisand's outfits.

  • Feb 20, 2020

    Didn't finish due to a certain sense of comfortable disingenuousness overwhelming the palate here.

    Didn't finish due to a certain sense of comfortable disingenuousness overwhelming the palate here.

  • Oct 11, 2019

    Few female directors have achieved the success of Barbra Streisand despite her having only directed three feature films. Of the three this film could be considered her crowning achievement as it was a box office hit and earned critical acclaim in the form of seven Academy Award nominations including one for Best Picture. While Streisand was controversially not nominated for Best Director she did gain respect and this gave her the opportunity to produce the divisive The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996). I can't say that I see the film as being one of the best of 1991 as it is heavily flawed but the actors put in fine performances and the melodrama is compelling enough to keep you engaged over two hours and twelve minutes. Out of work teacher and American football coach Tom Wingo, Nick Nolte, is having marital troubles with his wife Sally, Blythe Danner, as he struggles to get over the death of his brother. When he learns that his poet sister Savannah, Melinda Dillon, has attempted suicide again he travels to New York City to be with her for several months. He meets her psychiatrist Susan Lowenstein, Barbra Streisand, who intends to use him to find out about the childhood trauma that has led to Savannah being so depressed. Their problems seem to lead to their abusive mother Lila, Kate Nelligan, who manipulated them all as children and left their abusive father for a wealthy man who also turned out to be abusive. Lowenstein and Wingo fall in love as he works through his trauma and coaches her son Bernard, Jason Gould, in how to play football. After Wingo reveals his dark past the relationship between the two deepens but Wingo ultimately decides to return to his family while keeping the memory of Lowenstein with him always. The tonal shifts in the film are awkward as in seconds the film will move between Nolte discussing how he raped as a child by intruders to him being hit in the head by a dictionary and falling backwards in a slapstick fashion. While I understand that Streisand was trying to blend light romantic comedy and dark family drama, in the vein of Terms of Endearment (1983), she is not successful as the moments of humor and romance feel forced and undercut what could have been emotionally impactful scenes. The flashbacks to the rape scene are included in a fashion that feels tasteful and honest and as the camera rests on Nolte's face we do get an idea of the pain that this man feels as a result of these events. It would have been nice if this could have been explored deeper. The film itself would have benefitted greatly from not having it's two main characters fall into a love affair as it causes us to lose respect for Streisand, who initially appears smart and capable. When this wealthy, educated psychiatrist goes all mushy for Nolte's folksy southern accent and encourages him to spend time with her ‘bratty' son it comes out of left field as before this point she has seemed calculating and emotionally removed. The introduction of the idea that Nolte is attracted to Streisand also feels ridiculous, if in part because we know Streisand directed the film, with shots of her legs and narration in which Nolte admits he is intoxicated by her perfume. Yes, Streisand is a beautiful woman but we never understand what it is about her character, beyond her looks, that entices Nolte to be with her and this left me confounded during the long scenes of them canoodling on the beach. The overwrought score doesn't help matters as it makes Nolte's traumatic childhood feel like it comes out of The Yearling (1946) and the feeling that we are constantly being told what to feel is disconcerting. This is a shame because Nolte, Streisand and especially Nelligan do give some of the best performances of their respective careers and it is easy to see why they were lauded. Nelligan is wonderfully weird as a mother so mixed up that she tells each of her children that they are her favorite and she hates their siblings. Her southern accent seems the most robust and the abandon with which she throws herself at any man who will take her is believable when portrayed by an actress full of so much vibrancy. Streisand is great when she is the consummate professional but less enchanting as the goofy romantic lead in part due to her lack of chemistry with Nolte and how unthinkable it is that a woman with this much chutzpah would go for such a nut. Nolte was the most successful of the actors in the film in terms of nominations but I was never entirely convinced by his performance as he plumbs the depths of a man's soul far more convincingly in Affliction (1998).

    Few female directors have achieved the success of Barbra Streisand despite her having only directed three feature films. Of the three this film could be considered her crowning achievement as it was a box office hit and earned critical acclaim in the form of seven Academy Award nominations including one for Best Picture. While Streisand was controversially not nominated for Best Director she did gain respect and this gave her the opportunity to produce the divisive The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996). I can't say that I see the film as being one of the best of 1991 as it is heavily flawed but the actors put in fine performances and the melodrama is compelling enough to keep you engaged over two hours and twelve minutes. Out of work teacher and American football coach Tom Wingo, Nick Nolte, is having marital troubles with his wife Sally, Blythe Danner, as he struggles to get over the death of his brother. When he learns that his poet sister Savannah, Melinda Dillon, has attempted suicide again he travels to New York City to be with her for several months. He meets her psychiatrist Susan Lowenstein, Barbra Streisand, who intends to use him to find out about the childhood trauma that has led to Savannah being so depressed. Their problems seem to lead to their abusive mother Lila, Kate Nelligan, who manipulated them all as children and left their abusive father for a wealthy man who also turned out to be abusive. Lowenstein and Wingo fall in love as he works through his trauma and coaches her son Bernard, Jason Gould, in how to play football. After Wingo reveals his dark past the relationship between the two deepens but Wingo ultimately decides to return to his family while keeping the memory of Lowenstein with him always. The tonal shifts in the film are awkward as in seconds the film will move between Nolte discussing how he raped as a child by intruders to him being hit in the head by a dictionary and falling backwards in a slapstick fashion. While I understand that Streisand was trying to blend light romantic comedy and dark family drama, in the vein of Terms of Endearment (1983), she is not successful as the moments of humor and romance feel forced and undercut what could have been emotionally impactful scenes. The flashbacks to the rape scene are included in a fashion that feels tasteful and honest and as the camera rests on Nolte's face we do get an idea of the pain that this man feels as a result of these events. It would have been nice if this could have been explored deeper. The film itself would have benefitted greatly from not having it's two main characters fall into a love affair as it causes us to lose respect for Streisand, who initially appears smart and capable. When this wealthy, educated psychiatrist goes all mushy for Nolte's folksy southern accent and encourages him to spend time with her ‘bratty' son it comes out of left field as before this point she has seemed calculating and emotionally removed. The introduction of the idea that Nolte is attracted to Streisand also feels ridiculous, if in part because we know Streisand directed the film, with shots of her legs and narration in which Nolte admits he is intoxicated by her perfume. Yes, Streisand is a beautiful woman but we never understand what it is about her character, beyond her looks, that entices Nolte to be with her and this left me confounded during the long scenes of them canoodling on the beach. The overwrought score doesn't help matters as it makes Nolte's traumatic childhood feel like it comes out of The Yearling (1946) and the feeling that we are constantly being told what to feel is disconcerting. This is a shame because Nolte, Streisand and especially Nelligan do give some of the best performances of their respective careers and it is easy to see why they were lauded. Nelligan is wonderfully weird as a mother so mixed up that she tells each of her children that they are her favorite and she hates their siblings. Her southern accent seems the most robust and the abandon with which she throws herself at any man who will take her is believable when portrayed by an actress full of so much vibrancy. Streisand is great when she is the consummate professional but less enchanting as the goofy romantic lead in part due to her lack of chemistry with Nolte and how unthinkable it is that a woman with this much chutzpah would go for such a nut. Nolte was the most successful of the actors in the film in terms of nominations but I was never entirely convinced by his performance as he plumbs the depths of a man's soul far more convincingly in Affliction (1998).

  • Aug 09, 2019

    loved this movie. great romance, drama and surprises. nolte is great. never saw him as leading man before.

    loved this movie. great romance, drama and surprises. nolte is great. never saw him as leading man before.

  • Jul 28, 2019

    Hard, crude, intimate

    Hard, crude, intimate

  • Apr 17, 2019

    Powerful story, beautiful music, Streisand's best work.

    Powerful story, beautiful music, Streisand's best work.

  • Aug 17, 2018

    Terribly contrived and insulting to victims of abuse.

    Terribly contrived and insulting to victims of abuse.

  • Jul 20, 2018

    I would have never watched this movie if it wasn't for my mum, who is the main reason I'm the movie enthusiast that I am today. And hell, I would have missed alot! The Prince of Tides is one of those 90s flicks that feels somehow aged, but has put enormous thought into its own story, making it relevant and timeless. The plot it one of those that cannot be spoiled, hence I'm not going to. But let me tell you that after some minor drama, some romance, and some 90s cringe, there's a huge revelation that will leave noone cold. Nick Nolte's performance is absolutely astonishing and Barbra Streisand (also director of this movies) does her part very well. What confused me at first was the fact that after solving the main conflict of the protagonist, the movie goes on for another thirty minutes, what turned out to be the right choice, because The Prince of Tides delivers an absolutely satisfying end that successfully manages to navigate through the cliffs of love movie clichés. Great!

    I would have never watched this movie if it wasn't for my mum, who is the main reason I'm the movie enthusiast that I am today. And hell, I would have missed alot! The Prince of Tides is one of those 90s flicks that feels somehow aged, but has put enormous thought into its own story, making it relevant and timeless. The plot it one of those that cannot be spoiled, hence I'm not going to. But let me tell you that after some minor drama, some romance, and some 90s cringe, there's a huge revelation that will leave noone cold. Nick Nolte's performance is absolutely astonishing and Barbra Streisand (also director of this movies) does her part very well. What confused me at first was the fact that after solving the main conflict of the protagonist, the movie goes on for another thirty minutes, what turned out to be the right choice, because The Prince of Tides delivers an absolutely satisfying end that successfully manages to navigate through the cliffs of love movie clichés. Great!

  • Mar 07, 2018

    Beautifully shot, with a strong performance by Nick Nolte, this might be Barbra Streisand's best picture as a director, as she takes the audience into the dark tale of a Southern family and a heartfelt love story and ending. Inspiring and moving. A must see.

    Beautifully shot, with a strong performance by Nick Nolte, this might be Barbra Streisand's best picture as a director, as she takes the audience into the dark tale of a Southern family and a heartfelt love story and ending. Inspiring and moving. A must see.

  • Dec 16, 2017

    A wonderful film. A personal alltime favorite.

    A wonderful film. A personal alltime favorite.