Richard Jewell

Critics Consensus

Richard Jewell simplifies the real-life events that inspired it -- yet still proves that Clint Eastwood remains a skilled filmmaker of admirable economy.

75%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 132

93%

Audience Score

Verified Ratings: 28
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Movie Info

Directed by Clint Eastwood and based on true events, "Richard Jewell" is a story of what happens when what is reported as fact obscures the truth. "There is a bomb in Centennial Park. You have thirty minutes." The world is first introduced to Richard Jewell as the security guard who reports finding the device at the 1996 Atlanta bombing-his report making him a hero whose swift actions save countless lives. But within days, the law enforcement wannabe becomes the FBI's number one suspect, vilified by press and public alike, his life ripped apart. Reaching out to independent, anti-establishment attorney Watson Bryant, Jewell staunchly professes his innocence. But Bryant finds he is out of his depth as he fights the combined powers of the FBI, GBI and APD to clear his client's name, while keeping Richard from trusting the very people trying to destroy him.

Cast

Sam Rockwell
as Watson Bryant
Kathy Bates
as Bobi Jewell
Jon Hamm
as Tom Shaw
Olivia Wilde
as Kathy Scruggs
Paul Walter Hauser
as Richard Jewell
Ian Gomez
as Agent Dan Bennett
Charles Green
as Dr. W. Ray Cleere
Marc Farley
as Donut Buyer
Wayne Duvall
as Polygraph Examiner
Mitchell Hoog
as Teen Intern
Randy Havens
as Sound Tech
Niko Nicotera
as Dave Dutchess
Shiquita James
as Olympic Attendee
Mike Pniewski
as Brandon Hamm
Beth Keener
as Pregnant Woman
Deja Dee
as Woman in Park
Matthew Byrge
as Air Force Security
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News & Interviews for Richard Jewell

Critic Reviews for Richard Jewell

All Critics (132) | Top Critics (33) | Fresh (99) | Rotten (33)

Audience Reviews for Richard Jewell

  • 23h ago
    As I was watching Richard Jewell, a shocking realization began to form in my mind, something I had not anticipated from an awards-friendly venture from the likes of director Clint Eastwood – I was watching a strange secular version of a Kirk Cameron movie. Suddenly it all made sense where I had experienced this exact feeling before while watching a movie I knew wasn't working. For those who have never watched the low-budget Christian indie dramas starring Cameron, such as Fireproof or the hilariously titled Kirk Cameron Saves Christmas (spoiler: he encourages materialism), they aren't so much movies as they are filmed sermons, morals that have been given lackluster attention to turn into actual stories with actual characters. They don't quite exist in a recognizably human reality, so they are often heavy-handed, tone deaf, and very very clunky, and sadly I can ascribe those very same qualities to the movie Richard Jewell. Jewell (Paul Walter Hauser) is an eager, kind, awkward man who desperately wants to become a police officer and serve the public. His experience with law enforcement hasn't quite worked out, so he's currently serving as a security guard during the time of the 1996 Atlanta summer Olympics. He spots a suspicious bag during a concert in Centennial Park, follows protocol alerting others, and in doing so saves lives as it turns out to be a homemade bomb. At first Jewell is a national hero, and the everyman is on talk shows, thanked by strangers, and has a potential book deal in the works. Then the FBI, led by Agent Tom Shaw (Jon Hamm), and the media, represented by Atlanta journalist Kathy Scruggs (Olivia Wilde), turn the scrutiny onto Jewell himself. Suddenly the narrative twists and Jewell is believed to have planted the bomb to become the hero. Jewell is harassed by law enforcement, media speculation, and the pressure of trying to clear his name. He reaches out to an old colleague, rascally lawyer Watson Bryant (Sam Rockwell), to launch a defense and fight back against the Powers That Be. This is the passion play of Richard Jewell but nobody actually feels like a human being, let alone the person at the center of attention. There isn't a single person onscreen that feels like a person, though the closest is the lawyer, Bryant. Jewell's mother, Bobi (Kathy Bates), serves no other purpose but to act as her son's cheerleader through good times and bad. When she has her teary media speech late in the film, I was relatively unmoved, because she was a figurehead. Everyone in the movie represents an idea or an organization, thus serving them up for double duty. Much like a passion play, we're just here to watch the suffering and scold the abusers. It's a movie meant to get our blood boiling, but other movies have been made to provoke outrage, especially highlighting past injustices under-reported through history. There's nothing wrong with a movie that is made with the direct purpose of provoking anger at the mistreatment of others. The key is to make that central story relatable, otherwise the main figure is simply a one-dimensional martyr who only has the emotion of suffering. Without careful plotting and characterization, it can become an empty spectacle. With Richard Jewell, the main character is simply too boring as presented to be the lead. He's an ordinary guy, but rarely do we see him in moments that provide layers or depth to him. And maybe that's who he was, a transparent, average man who was too trusting of authority figures and a fair system of justice. Still, it's the filmmakers' responsibilities to make Richard Jewell feel like a compelling and multi-dimensional character in a movie literally called Richard Jewell. Even if the character arc is this poor sap starts to stand up for himself, this is severely underplayed. I sympathized with him but he felt more like a Saturday morning children's mascot. He doesn't feel like a person, let alone an interesting person, and that's a big problem when he's the closest thing the movie offers as a character and not a figurehead. By far the worst character is Wilde's media stand-in, a character so abrasively tone deaf and odious that when the bombing happens, she prays that she will be the one to get a scoop. The Evil Media Lady, which is what I'm renaming her because that's all she serves in the story, is an awful amalgamation of the worst critiques people have with the media: rushing to judgment, callous indifference, and naked self-serving greed. The fact that she's an invented character means she's meant to represent the whole of the media, and yes, the media is one of the bad guys in the Richard Jewell story. They deserve ample criticism and condemnation, but when you serve them up in this careless, over-the-top manner, the vilification becomes more apparent than their culpability. Evil Media Lady literally sleeps with an FBI agent to get her scoops, scoops that end up being wrong, because she's so devious and doesn't care about The Truth. There is literally a dialogue exchange where she says, "I print the facts," and another character retorts, "What about the truth, huh?" And wouldn't you know, by the end, when Jewell's mother gives her speech, who is listening and having a completely out-of-character turnaround but Evil Media Lady. I texted my friend Joe Marino as this was happening: "The power of her old white lady sad is making EVIL MEDIA LADY sad too, which means old white lady sad is the most powerful sad on Earth." The FBI are also portrayed as a group of conniving snakes who must have thought Jewell was the dumbest human being on the planet the way they interacted with him. When the FBI sets its sights on Jewell as the prime suspect, they bring him in under the guise that they're filming a training video and he needs help them with some role-playing scenarios. It's so obvious that it feels fake, and yet my pal Joe Marino replied that this was a real moment, that the FBI had such a low opinion of Jewell that they could get him to sign away his confession through trickery: "We're going to… pretend… see, that we brought you in as a suspect… and pretend we read you your rights… and you're going to… pretend… you're the bomber. Now please actually sign this… pretend form and do not ask for a real lawyer." I almost need a Big Short-style fourth-wall break where somebody turns to the camera and says, "This really happened." In fact, a Big Short mixture of documentary, drama, and education would have served this movie well. Here's the problem with serving up the media and FBI in this manner. They deserve scorn and scrutiny, but when you turn them into exaggerated cartoons of villainy, then it colors the moments onscreen when they're actually doing the things that they did in real life. This is mitigating the movie's level of realism as well as the emotional impact. It's not a person versus a system but rather a martyr versus a series of cartoonish cretins all trying to punish this good Christian man. The shame of the matter is that Jewell was done great harm for acting courageously, and there is definitely a movie in his tale, but I think the way to go would have been making his lawyer the main focal point. That way there's more of a dynamic character arc of a man putting it all on the line to defend a media pariah, it could open up to the doubts the lawyer has early on, especially as Jewell is aloof or cagey about certain damaging info (he didn't pay taxes for years?), eventually coming to realize the quality of man he was defending. Jewell, as a character, is static and stays the same throughout despite his great emotional upheaval. A story benefits from its protagonist changing through the story's circumstances, and that's where Rockwell's character could come into view. He's also by far the most engaging person and he has enough savvy to be able to fight back in the courts and court of public opinion, becoming an effective ally for a desperate man. That way it's a story of trust and friendship and righting a wrong rather than a good-if-misunderstood man being martyred. Throughout the two hours, Richard Jewell kept adding more and more examples of being a clunky and heavy-handed exercise. It would have been better for the bombing to be the inciting incident rather than the Act One break, sparing us so many scenes that do little and could be referenced rather than witnessed. Do we need to actually see Jewell getting fired from jobs to feel for him? There's a reoccurring motif of Jewell bringing Snickers candy bars to Bryant as a friendly gift, and it's so clumsy and weird. I started wondering if maybe Mars, Incorporated had paid for the bizarre product placement ("When you definitely did not plant a bomb in Centennial Park, break into a Snickers!"). There's a dramatic beat where Jewell is trying to coax his distraught mother on the other side of a closed door. He just keeps repeatedly saying, "Momma please," over and over while the music builds, and I guess the magic number was 17, and after that iteration she opens the door and they hug. It's such an amazingly awkward scene. The dialogue has that same unreality as the rest of the movie, trying too hard to be declarative or leading, giving us lines like, "I'd rather be crazy than wrong," and, "A little power can make a man into a monster." It's the kind of portentous, inauthentic dialogue exchanges I see in those Kirk Cameron movies. I wouldn't have been that shocked if, by the end, the patriarch of Duck Dynasty showed up, running over the Evil Media Lady, and then they held a benefit concert for the persecution of white Christian males. I'm being a bit facetious here but Richard Jewell shouldn't remind me of the derelict storytelling and characterization in hammy message-driven religious panoplies. I was honestly shocked by Richard Jewell. I was expecting far more given the caliber of talent involved in the project as well as the inherent injustice in Jewell's plight. Eastwood's modern passion play feels too insufficient in passion. It's an awkward movie that doesn't give us a real character at its center, and it plays like every other human being in the universe is a representative of some storytelling function to service that empty center. There were lines of dialogue I just had to scoff over. There were moments that made me roll my eyes. I just couldn't believe something this clunky could be designed for a late run for awards. The acting is all suitable, and Hauser does fine work as a mild-mannered everyman in a crucible, though I think he showed more adept skill in the enormously compelling I, Tonya. In fact, that 2017 movie could have been a lesson in how to tackle the filmic story of Richard Jewell, mixing in non-fiction elements to retell a story from multiple, fractured, contentious points of view that leapt off the pages. It feels there are many steps that should have been taken instead. Richard Jewell isn't an awful or irredeemable movie, even though Eastwood's typically plain shooting style feels even more strained and bland. It's a movie I could see a contingent of the public genuinely enjoying, especially those already with a healthy mistrust of the FBI and media (you know who you are). But for me, it felt like I was watching the awards-friendly version of Kirk Cameron's Christians are People Too. And again, Jewell deserves a major expose to chronicle his real injustices. He also deserves better than this. Nate's Grade: C
    Nate Z Super Reviewer

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