The Rocketeer Reviews

  • Jan 18, 2020

    Just Meh! Nothing to write home about. Except I wonder why his rear end isn't burnt off.

    Just Meh! Nothing to write home about. Except I wonder why his rear end isn't burnt off.

  • Aug 22, 2019

    This is an amazing movie. There is nothing not to love about it. The casting is perfect, the cinematography works beautifully and brings such great energy to a fun, sweet story.

    This is an amazing movie. There is nothing not to love about it. The casting is perfect, the cinematography works beautifully and brings such great energy to a fun, sweet story.

  • Aug 10, 2019

    This holds up the best compared to The Shadow and The Phantom. Out of those 3, The Rocketeer unquestionably has the best antagonist(very convincing performance from the underrated Bond Timothy Dalton), best climax, and best side characters. It isn't perfect however as the lead character's non-hero alter ego is pretty bland and the film overwelcomes its stay by just a few minutes. Ultimately it is very solid entertainment with Indiana Jones-esque elements sprinkled around it. Plus I'm a sucker for early 20th century aesthetics.

    This holds up the best compared to The Shadow and The Phantom. Out of those 3, The Rocketeer unquestionably has the best antagonist(very convincing performance from the underrated Bond Timothy Dalton), best climax, and best side characters. It isn't perfect however as the lead character's non-hero alter ego is pretty bland and the film overwelcomes its stay by just a few minutes. Ultimately it is very solid entertainment with Indiana Jones-esque elements sprinkled around it. Plus I'm a sucker for early 20th century aesthetics.

  • Aug 10, 2019

    It was cute, though dumb and simple. The characters were also simple, and dumb. All felt a bit cliched, though perhaps that's a side effect of the whole purpose of the film. I laughed a few times, though I suspect mostly from unintentional means. Very low budget. Timothy Dalton always makes a wonderful villain.

    It was cute, though dumb and simple. The characters were also simple, and dumb. All felt a bit cliched, though perhaps that's a side effect of the whole purpose of the film. I laughed a few times, though I suspect mostly from unintentional means. Very low budget. Timothy Dalton always makes a wonderful villain.

  • Jul 09, 2019

    As fare as adventure flicks go you won't get much better than this, it's cheesy as hell but in the exact right way, proper old school hero story.

    As fare as adventure flicks go you won't get much better than this, it's cheesy as hell but in the exact right way, proper old school hero story.

  • Apr 22, 2019

    This movie is a classic. It has a timeless haze over it that reminds me of Indiana Jones and The Phantom. It's not a large globe trotting movie as the previously mentioned, in fact, its the opposite. It's a small town struck by a big problem. The characters, though are not of ocean depth, are specific with each of their stories and uniquely fit together forming a cast of characters all pushing the story along at the same pace. There are no side stories that lose direction of the film but add small details to what's important to each of them. This carries the viewer along to points where you feel for characters and wish they would succeed in their hopes and dreams. It is a movie that reminds you of the times where you'd be eating a bowl of cereal and playing with your toys while a light hearted adventure was being told on your screen.

    This movie is a classic. It has a timeless haze over it that reminds me of Indiana Jones and The Phantom. It's not a large globe trotting movie as the previously mentioned, in fact, its the opposite. It's a small town struck by a big problem. The characters, though are not of ocean depth, are specific with each of their stories and uniquely fit together forming a cast of characters all pushing the story along at the same pace. There are no side stories that lose direction of the film but add small details to what's important to each of them. This carries the viewer along to points where you feel for characters and wish they would succeed in their hopes and dreams. It is a movie that reminds you of the times where you'd be eating a bowl of cereal and playing with your toys while a light hearted adventure was being told on your screen.

  • Apr 11, 2019

    In 1938 Los Angeles, two gangsters in Eddie Valentine's gang steal a rocket pack from Howard Hughes. During their escape from the authorities that ends up on an airfield, one gangster is shot to death, the getaway driver hides the rocket pack, and stunt pilot Cliff Secord's (Billy Campbell) Gee Bee racer is totaled in the resulting auto-airplane accident, crippling his career; he and airplane mechanic A. "Peevy" Peabody (Alan Arkin) later find the rocket pack hidden in a biplane cockpit. Movie star Neville Sinclair (Timothy Dalton) had hired Valentine's gang to steal the rocket pack, and he sends his monstrous henchman Lothar to question the injured getaway driver, who tells him about his hiding the rocket pack at the airfield. Cliff's girlfriend is aspiring actress Jenny Blake (Jennifer Connelly), who has a bit part in Sinclair's latest swashbuckling film, but recent events begin to drive a wedge in their relationship. Sinclair overhears Cliff attempting to tell Jenny about the rocket pack, so he invites her to dinner. Afterward, at a local air show, Cliff uses the rocket pack (and Peevy's newly designed face-hiding finned helmet) to rescue his friend Malcolm, who is drunkenly piloting the biplane. The newsreel press and Valentine's gangsters all see him from the airshow audience, whereupon "The Rocketeer" becomes a media sensation, but also sets Sinclair and the FBI on Cliff's tail... Roger Ebert enjoyed the film, noting its homages to the film serials of the 1930s/1950s. Although Ebert cited the visual effects as being state of the art, he described them "as charmingly direct as those rockets in the Flash Gordon serials "the ones with sparklers hidden inside of them, which were pulled on wires in front of papier-mâch (C) mountains". Leonard Maltin wrote that the "film captures the look of the '30s, as well as the gee-whiz innocence of Saturday matin (C)e serials, but it's talky and takes too much time to get where it's going. Dalton has fun as a villain patterned after Errol Flynn". Peter Travers of Rolling Stone magazine also gave a positive review. "The Rocketeer is more than one of the best films of the summer; it's the kind of movie magic that we don't see much anymore", he continued, "the kind that charms us, rather than bullying us, into suspending disbelief". Rocketeer creator Dave Stevens acknowledged he was "satisfied with 70% of the film" and highly praised Joe Johnston's direction. "The overall spirit and sweetness of the series is still there, intact", Stevens remembers. "We lost some good character stuff in editing for time, but the tone of it is still what I was trying to project in the comic pages. I also thought Joe's casting choices were excellent. To his credit, Joe did not fill out the cast with a bunch of Beverly Hills, 90210 Barbie and Ken-type kids". Stevens found Billy Campbell to be "a good-looking guy, but he also happens to be Cliff! I would never have cast him based on good looks alone, but he came into the audition and just nailed it shut. He was made for it. The part was his". "Rocketeer" which is based on Dave Stevens comic is a truly nice little action adventure set in the 1930s Hollywood channeling the vibes and atmosphere of 1930s films. The cast is nice with Billy Campbell, Alan Arkin, Timothy Dalton and the always lovely Jennifer Connelly. The storyline is ok with a nice touch of Indiana Jones in it and the action sequences work pretty well for being done in 1991.

    In 1938 Los Angeles, two gangsters in Eddie Valentine's gang steal a rocket pack from Howard Hughes. During their escape from the authorities that ends up on an airfield, one gangster is shot to death, the getaway driver hides the rocket pack, and stunt pilot Cliff Secord's (Billy Campbell) Gee Bee racer is totaled in the resulting auto-airplane accident, crippling his career; he and airplane mechanic A. "Peevy" Peabody (Alan Arkin) later find the rocket pack hidden in a biplane cockpit. Movie star Neville Sinclair (Timothy Dalton) had hired Valentine's gang to steal the rocket pack, and he sends his monstrous henchman Lothar to question the injured getaway driver, who tells him about his hiding the rocket pack at the airfield. Cliff's girlfriend is aspiring actress Jenny Blake (Jennifer Connelly), who has a bit part in Sinclair's latest swashbuckling film, but recent events begin to drive a wedge in their relationship. Sinclair overhears Cliff attempting to tell Jenny about the rocket pack, so he invites her to dinner. Afterward, at a local air show, Cliff uses the rocket pack (and Peevy's newly designed face-hiding finned helmet) to rescue his friend Malcolm, who is drunkenly piloting the biplane. The newsreel press and Valentine's gangsters all see him from the airshow audience, whereupon "The Rocketeer" becomes a media sensation, but also sets Sinclair and the FBI on Cliff's tail... Roger Ebert enjoyed the film, noting its homages to the film serials of the 1930s/1950s. Although Ebert cited the visual effects as being state of the art, he described them "as charmingly direct as those rockets in the Flash Gordon serials "the ones with sparklers hidden inside of them, which were pulled on wires in front of papier-mâch (C) mountains". Leonard Maltin wrote that the "film captures the look of the '30s, as well as the gee-whiz innocence of Saturday matin (C)e serials, but it's talky and takes too much time to get where it's going. Dalton has fun as a villain patterned after Errol Flynn". Peter Travers of Rolling Stone magazine also gave a positive review. "The Rocketeer is more than one of the best films of the summer; it's the kind of movie magic that we don't see much anymore", he continued, "the kind that charms us, rather than bullying us, into suspending disbelief". Rocketeer creator Dave Stevens acknowledged he was "satisfied with 70% of the film" and highly praised Joe Johnston's direction. "The overall spirit and sweetness of the series is still there, intact", Stevens remembers. "We lost some good character stuff in editing for time, but the tone of it is still what I was trying to project in the comic pages. I also thought Joe's casting choices were excellent. To his credit, Joe did not fill out the cast with a bunch of Beverly Hills, 90210 Barbie and Ken-type kids". Stevens found Billy Campbell to be "a good-looking guy, but he also happens to be Cliff! I would never have cast him based on good looks alone, but he came into the audition and just nailed it shut. He was made for it. The part was his". "Rocketeer" which is based on Dave Stevens comic is a truly nice little action adventure set in the 1930s Hollywood channeling the vibes and atmosphere of 1930s films. The cast is nice with Billy Campbell, Alan Arkin, Timothy Dalton and the always lovely Jennifer Connelly. The storyline is ok with a nice touch of Indiana Jones in it and the action sequences work pretty well for being done in 1991.

  • Apr 05, 2019

    One of my All-Time favourites! A true classic!

    One of my All-Time favourites! A true classic!

  • Oct 25, 2018

    This movie is underrated and deserves more attention.

    This movie is underrated and deserves more attention.

  • Aug 27, 2018

    Slightly generous rating here. Sort of like a poor man's Iron Man if anything, set in the late 30's with the main guy looking like a cross between John Cusack and Brendan Fraser. The graphics are dated as hell and cliché plot points galore(complete with the villain kidnapping the girl to be saved at the end :eye roll:). Timothy Dalton does well in the villain role though and Jennifer Connelly is supremely gorgeous in this too. I'm sure if I had watched this in the 90's when it came out this would have been more enjoyable, so maybe this rating is a bit unfair. Oh well.

    Slightly generous rating here. Sort of like a poor man's Iron Man if anything, set in the late 30's with the main guy looking like a cross between John Cusack and Brendan Fraser. The graphics are dated as hell and cliché plot points galore(complete with the villain kidnapping the girl to be saved at the end :eye roll:). Timothy Dalton does well in the villain role though and Jennifer Connelly is supremely gorgeous in this too. I'm sure if I had watched this in the 90's when it came out this would have been more enjoyable, so maybe this rating is a bit unfair. Oh well.