The Isle Reviews

May 4, 2005
A creepy, gruesome, gorgeous and flabbergasting treatise on romantic obsession and violent, nasty male-female relationships.
September 14, 2004
May 21, 2004
Spring, Summer fans should only have their appreciation of that film expanded by seeing this rougher take on similar themes.
January 31, 2003
Beautiful, angry and sad, with a curious sick poetry, as if the Marquis de Sade had gone in for pastel landscapes.
January 16, 2003
There is little question that this is a serious work by an important director who has something new to say about how, in the flip-flop of courtship, we often reel in when we should be playing out.
January 3, 2003
A gorgeous and grotesque Korean film by director Kim Ki-Duk, who seems torn by his artistic and exploitive impulses.
August 23, 2002
Once [Kim] begins to overplay the shock tactics and bait-and-tackle metaphors, you may decide it's too high a price to pay for a shimmering picture postcard.
August 23, 2002
Daring, mesmerizing and exceedingly hard to forget.
August 22, 2002
As gory as the scenes of torture and self-mutilation may be, they are pitted against shimmering cinematography that lends the setting the ethereal beauty of an Asian landscape painting.
August 20, 2002
A potent allegorical love story.
August 20, 2002
I don't think I've been as entranced and appalled by an Asian film since Shinya Tsukamoto's Iron Man.
August 19, 2002
Its juxtaposition of overwrought existentialism and stomach-churning gore will have you forever on the verge of either cracking up or throwing up.
August 8, 2002
Kim Ki-Deok seems to have in mind an (emotionally at least) adolescent audience demanding regular shocks and bouts of barely defensible sexual violence to keep it interested.
July 28, 2002
While The Isle is both preposterous and thoroughly misogynistic, its vistas are incredibly beautiful to look at.