Shaft in Africa Reviews

  • Mar 01, 2014

    I love that movie!!!!

    I love that movie!!!!

  • Feb 03, 2014

    In the third and last in the original Shaft (1971) series of action-packed "blaxploitation" pictures, private eye John Shaft (Richard Roundtree) travels to the "motherland," where he breaks up a modern slavery ring. Shaft is hired by a diplomat, Emir Ramila (Cy Grant), to infiltrate the criminal empire of the evil Vincent Amafi (Frank Finlay), who is kidnapping poor Africans and shipping them to Europe as slave laborers. Amafi murdered Ramila's son when he attempted to expose the illegal operation, and Ramila, now aware that his investigation of Amafi has been...

    In the third and last in the original Shaft (1971) series of action-packed "blaxploitation" pictures, private eye John Shaft (Richard Roundtree) travels to the "motherland," where he breaks up a modern slavery ring. Shaft is hired by a diplomat, Emir Ramila (Cy Grant), to infiltrate the criminal empire of the evil Vincent Amafi (Frank Finlay), who is kidnapping poor Africans and shipping them to Europe as slave laborers. Amafi murdered Ramila's son when he attempted to expose the illegal operation, and Ramila, now aware that his investigation of Amafi has been...

  • Jan 14, 2014

    (70%) The "Lawrence of Arabia" of soul cinema. A superbly entertaining final chapter to the biggest name in blaxploitation. The James Bond references are great fun and the quality of production is really quite good. A must watch for all fans of 70's action cinema.

    (70%) The "Lawrence of Arabia" of soul cinema. A superbly entertaining final chapter to the biggest name in blaxploitation. The James Bond references are great fun and the quality of production is really quite good. A must watch for all fans of 70's action cinema.

  • Aug 21, 2013

    Are you man enough, big and bad enough, to dig this superfly Shaft flick--That Shaft character is one violent cat!!

    Are you man enough, big and bad enough, to dig this superfly Shaft flick--That Shaft character is one violent cat!!

  • Jun 19, 2013

    Campy, silly, yet more enjoyable than the last sequel, Shaft goes James Bond as he goes undercover to Africa to stop a slavery ring. Shaft is more of a killer here and doesn't mind kicking butt. He also has more time with the ladies as the nudity and sex is as bad as the title character himself. Grade: B-

    Campy, silly, yet more enjoyable than the last sequel, Shaft goes James Bond as he goes undercover to Africa to stop a slavery ring. Shaft is more of a killer here and doesn't mind kicking butt. He also has more time with the ladies as the nudity and sex is as bad as the title character himself. Grade: B-

  • Jun 04, 2013

    The first Shaft sequel kept the original director, writer and star, and was only missing Issac Hays doing the music. The third Shaft film is missing everyone from the original with the exception of Richard Roundtree returning to play PI John Shaft. This sequel takes Shaft out of New York and has him going undercover to fight the slave trade in Africa. The story isn't bad, but it's not exactly the story fans of the previous films were clamoring for. Roundtree is definitely still the same character, but the situation and setting is so different from the other films, it comes off like taking say, Bruce Willis in "Die Hard" and putting him into a story about blood diamonds. Sure, blood diamonds are a topic worthy of a film, but that's not exactly why you go do see a Die Hard film. The film has decent production value and the action is decent, but I was kind of disappointed.

    The first Shaft sequel kept the original director, writer and star, and was only missing Issac Hays doing the music. The third Shaft film is missing everyone from the original with the exception of Richard Roundtree returning to play PI John Shaft. This sequel takes Shaft out of New York and has him going undercover to fight the slave trade in Africa. The story isn't bad, but it's not exactly the story fans of the previous films were clamoring for. Roundtree is definitely still the same character, but the situation and setting is so different from the other films, it comes off like taking say, Bruce Willis in "Die Hard" and putting him into a story about blood diamonds. Sure, blood diamonds are a topic worthy of a film, but that's not exactly why you go do see a Die Hard film. The film has decent production value and the action is decent, but I was kind of disappointed.

  • May 04, 2013

    What an interesting movie. An old classic i will like to watch over and over again

    What an interesting movie. An old classic i will like to watch over and over again

  • Mar 10, 2013

    With Shaft (1971) and Shaft's Big Score! (1972) doing well at the box office, MGM had even made a deal with CBS to do a TV series and they decided to do something different for the 3rd film in the series. They got director John Guillermin and writer Stirling Silliphant (who would both work on The Towering Inferno (1974)). The film was a sad flop, and the franchise didn't continue after this. Pity, as the change of scene worked here. John Shaft (Richard Roundtree) finds himself being drugged and sent off help stop a slave ring in Ethiopia, persuaded by beautiful teacher Aleme (Vonetta McGee), who is the daughter of the Emir Ramila (Cy Grant). Shaft is asked to break up a slave trade ring whose origins are in Paris and ruled by a tyrannical mobster Vincent Amafi (Frank Finlay), but it means having to go undercover as a slave in the hope of being picked up by Amafi's men, but not before gets involved with Jazar (Neda Arneric). But, Shaft eventually finds himself in France, being up Amafi's henchman M. Perreau (Jacques Herlin), but Shaft is going to bust this ring. It's a better film than Shaft's Big Score! as it has the international glamour of a Bond film, but this came out around the same time as Super Fly T.N.T. (1973), which was similarly themed, and they knocked one another off the box-office. Shame really.

    With Shaft (1971) and Shaft's Big Score! (1972) doing well at the box office, MGM had even made a deal with CBS to do a TV series and they decided to do something different for the 3rd film in the series. They got director John Guillermin and writer Stirling Silliphant (who would both work on The Towering Inferno (1974)). The film was a sad flop, and the franchise didn't continue after this. Pity, as the change of scene worked here. John Shaft (Richard Roundtree) finds himself being drugged and sent off help stop a slave ring in Ethiopia, persuaded by beautiful teacher Aleme (Vonetta McGee), who is the daughter of the Emir Ramila (Cy Grant). Shaft is asked to break up a slave trade ring whose origins are in Paris and ruled by a tyrannical mobster Vincent Amafi (Frank Finlay), but it means having to go undercover as a slave in the hope of being picked up by Amafi's men, but not before gets involved with Jazar (Neda Arneric). But, Shaft eventually finds himself in France, being up Amafi's henchman M. Perreau (Jacques Herlin), but Shaft is going to bust this ring. It's a better film than Shaft's Big Score! as it has the international glamour of a Bond film, but this came out around the same time as Super Fly T.N.T. (1973), which was similarly themed, and they knocked one another off the box-office. Shame really.

  • Mar 07, 2013

    I think the problem I had while watching "Shaft in Africa" is that it took Shaft out of his element (I wanna see him kicking ass on the streets!) with very little logical reasoning as to why. Why would these African people ask some Private Eye to come fight this thing in Africa? It just seems like they randomly selected him...it isn't like he has built up some worldly reputation of taking down baddies, he has pretty much operated against drug lords in New York. The point is I could totally accept an entry like this after a few more films of Shaft kicking ass and gaining some kind of reputation like James Bond...but he just hadn't yet (beyond the context of the films). It doesn't help matters that the director of the first two films, Gordon Parks, is no longer involved. Still there is some good stuff in the film here and there, and Richard Roundtree remains cool as John Shaft (as he takes on an African slave trade no less!)...but I just would've liked the sequels to stick with the Private Eye thing.

    I think the problem I had while watching "Shaft in Africa" is that it took Shaft out of his element (I wanna see him kicking ass on the streets!) with very little logical reasoning as to why. Why would these African people ask some Private Eye to come fight this thing in Africa? It just seems like they randomly selected him...it isn't like he has built up some worldly reputation of taking down baddies, he has pretty much operated against drug lords in New York. The point is I could totally accept an entry like this after a few more films of Shaft kicking ass and gaining some kind of reputation like James Bond...but he just hadn't yet (beyond the context of the films). It doesn't help matters that the director of the first two films, Gordon Parks, is no longer involved. Still there is some good stuff in the film here and there, and Richard Roundtree remains cool as John Shaft (as he takes on an African slave trade no less!)...but I just would've liked the sequels to stick with the Private Eye thing.

  • Dec 10, 2012

    Shaft (Richard Roundtree) poses as a slave, unmasks the leaders of an Africa-to-Europe slavery cartel and, for good measure, mixes his business with amorous pleasure involving a beautiful princess (Vonetta McGee). also stars Frank Finlay, Neda Arneric, Debbie Eshetu, Spiros Focas, Thomas Baptiste, Jon Chevron and Glynn Edwards. directed by John Guillermin.

    Shaft (Richard Roundtree) poses as a slave, unmasks the leaders of an Africa-to-Europe slavery cartel and, for good measure, mixes his business with amorous pleasure involving a beautiful princess (Vonetta McGee). also stars Frank Finlay, Neda Arneric, Debbie Eshetu, Spiros Focas, Thomas Baptiste, Jon Chevron and Glynn Edwards. directed by John Guillermin.