Sicario: Day of the Soldado Reviews

  • 4d ago

    I love this movie but the original is just far better than this movie. Yet, this is only its simplicity. The audience and critics, mostly, difficult to appreciate this movie. There is nothing wrong too if someone likes and someone hates it. "Day of the Soldado" is a bit of predictable but still it's a great thriller entertainment spectacle. It's brutal, quite deep, and dark as the first movie.

    I love this movie but the original is just far better than this movie. Yet, this is only its simplicity. The audience and critics, mostly, difficult to appreciate this movie. There is nothing wrong too if someone likes and someone hates it. "Day of the Soldado" is a bit of predictable but still it's a great thriller entertainment spectacle. It's brutal, quite deep, and dark as the first movie.

  • Sep 10, 2019

    If you loved the first one, pay attention and you will appreciate this one.

    If you loved the first one, pay attention and you will appreciate this one.

  • Sep 04, 2019

    Not as compelling as it's predecessor. Plot takes a boring and different direction.

    Not as compelling as it's predecessor. Plot takes a boring and different direction.

  • Sep 01, 2019

    In terms of story-telling, it doesn't rival its predecessor. That's not to say it all goes hideously wrong, just that I had hoped for a little more. However, thanks to superb performances from Josh Brolin, Isabela Moner and Benicio Del Toro who, in particular, really shines; as well as some slick filming that manages to replicate the first instalment's dark, gritty atmosphere, you still have yourself a pretty thrilling and tense, if somewhat grim piece of entertainment.

    In terms of story-telling, it doesn't rival its predecessor. That's not to say it all goes hideously wrong, just that I had hoped for a little more. However, thanks to superb performances from Josh Brolin, Isabela Moner and Benicio Del Toro who, in particular, really shines; as well as some slick filming that manages to replicate the first instalment's dark, gritty atmosphere, you still have yourself a pretty thrilling and tense, if somewhat grim piece of entertainment.

  • Aug 28, 2019

    Great movie until the open-ended ending.

    Great movie until the open-ended ending.

  • Aug 27, 2019

    I was somewhat sceptical at first when this film was announced. Yes, I wanted to see more stories with these characters and yet I wasn´t really sure what this movie could bring. That first movie was, and still is, one of the best crime/action thrillers I´ve really ever seen and it wrapped things up pretty nicely with its ending. What I mean is that I didn´t see the potential for a sequel. Thankfully this movie proved me very wrong. Denis Villeneuve sadly did not return to direct this movie but, fortunately, Stefano Sollima did a very solid job in his absence. He teamed up with Taylor Sheridan who returns as the screenwriter for this sequel and they do bring us some really dazzling sequences. Similar to the original there are some great tension-filled scenes which I personally found to be the best part of the movie. Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro return for this movie and their performances really do sell the bleakness and the amorality that this film is trying to portray. The films dark tone adds to the realism and makes the story a lot more compelling. I´d say the films main plot could´ve been set up a bit better and the first act felt somewhat rushed. Also at times it reuses some of the tropes from the first movie which can make it feel slightly derivative of its predecessor. The movie also could´ve been paced a bit better, near the middle of the runtime it does drag a bit. Still its an excellent thriller with a very bleak message and I genuinely enjoyed it. Its a 4 for me.

    I was somewhat sceptical at first when this film was announced. Yes, I wanted to see more stories with these characters and yet I wasn´t really sure what this movie could bring. That first movie was, and still is, one of the best crime/action thrillers I´ve really ever seen and it wrapped things up pretty nicely with its ending. What I mean is that I didn´t see the potential for a sequel. Thankfully this movie proved me very wrong. Denis Villeneuve sadly did not return to direct this movie but, fortunately, Stefano Sollima did a very solid job in his absence. He teamed up with Taylor Sheridan who returns as the screenwriter for this sequel and they do bring us some really dazzling sequences. Similar to the original there are some great tension-filled scenes which I personally found to be the best part of the movie. Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro return for this movie and their performances really do sell the bleakness and the amorality that this film is trying to portray. The films dark tone adds to the realism and makes the story a lot more compelling. I´d say the films main plot could´ve been set up a bit better and the first act felt somewhat rushed. Also at times it reuses some of the tropes from the first movie which can make it feel slightly derivative of its predecessor. The movie also could´ve been paced a bit better, near the middle of the runtime it does drag a bit. Still its an excellent thriller with a very bleak message and I genuinely enjoyed it. Its a 4 for me.

  • Aug 22, 2019

    Not as good as the first one, and the movie takes a different tone and approach that I'm not sure I am a big fan, but it is a decent watch.

    Not as good as the first one, and the movie takes a different tone and approach that I'm not sure I am a big fan, but it is a decent watch.

  • Aug 22, 2019

    A suicide bombing in a Kansas City grocery store kills fifteen people. The United States government responds by authorizing CIA officer Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) to apply extreme measures to combat Mexican drug cartels who are suspected of having smuggled the terrorists across the border. Graver and the Department of Defense decide the best option is to instigate a war between the major cartels, and Graver recruits black operative Alejandro Gillick (Benicio del Toro) for the mission. Gillick assassinates a high-profile lawyer of the Matamoros cartel in Mexico City while Graver and his team kidnap Isabel Reyes, the daughter of the kingpin of the Matamoros' rival, Carlos Reyes (who ordered the killing of Gillick's family in the previous film), in a false flag operation. Graver, Gillick, and their team take Isabel to Texas and stage a fake rescue with the help of the DEA and local police, trying to make her think she was kidnapped by her father's enemies. Gillick bonds with Isabel, and the team makes plans to transport her back to Mexico. They plan to leave her in territory controlled by her father's rivals to further escalate the inter-cartel conflict. However, after they cross into Mexico, the Mexican police escorts double-cross them and attack the American vehicles. Graver and his team kill 25 Mexican policemen to escape the ambush. Amidst the chaos, Isabel runs away into the desert. Gillick goes after her alone while the rest of the team returns to the United States. Meanwhile, the American government determines that at least two of the suicide bombers in Kansas City were actually domestic terrorists, not foreign nationals, and thus were not smuggled into the United States by the cartels. To quell tensions with Mexico, the Secretary of Defense orders the CIA to abandon the mission. Learning that Isabel witnessed the Americans shooting the Mexican police, the Secretary orders the team to erase all proof of American involvement by killing Isabel and Gillick. Graver in turn orders Gillick to kill Isabel, but Gillick refuses and turns rogue to keep her alive. Graver and his team fly covertly into Mexico, using a GPS device embedded in Isabel's shoe to find them. Gillick knows that if Isabel remains in Mexico, she will be killed. With few resources, he disguises them both as illegal immigrants and pays human traffickers to help them reenter the United States... Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "Though less subversive than its predecessor, Sicario: Day of the Soldado succeeds as a stylish, dynamic thriller—even if its amoral machismo makes for grim viewing." Variety's Peter Debruge called the film "tense, tough, and shockingly ruthless at times," and wrote, "Soldado may not be as masterful as Villeneuve's original, but it sets up a world of possibilities for elaborating on a complex conflict far too rich to be resolved in two hours' time." Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter praised the film as a "worthy, rough-and-tough sequel", highlighting the direction, lead performances and Sheridan's script, and saying "Sicario: Day of the Soldado emerges as a dynamic action drama in its own right." Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek found the film to be adequate, though lacking the presence of a character in the sequel as emotive as the one played by Emily Blunt in the original, stating: "There's not a Blunt in sight, though special task force macho men Matt Graver and Alejandro... return. This time their job is to stir up a war between rival Mexican drug cartels; part of the scheme involves kidnapping a drug lord's scrappy teenage daughter. Although she has enough teen-beat orneriness to kick both Matt's and Alejandro's butts, the movie doesn't let her." "Sicario: Day of the Soldado" is not as good as Denis Villeneu´s first film, but it has it´s moments for sure. The first film was by far a fantastic dark, brutal and very realistic piece of film. Denis Villeneuve could not return to direct this sequel due to scheduling conflicts with "Arrival" and "Blade Runner 2049". Nevertheless, I like the cinematography and the direction in this film as well and they have used similar sound structure from the first film, but the storyline is not as good as in "Sicario" I think. And without Emily Blunt a piece is missing in my book. Emily Blunt was originally attached to reprise her role as FBI Agent Kate Macer. However, director Stefano Sollima ultimately decided not to use Blunt or her character in the film, noting that Macer represented the moral compass in Sicario (2015), whereas he did not want any character to serve as moral guidance in the sequel. Screenwriter Taylor Sheridan, who wrote the story and screenplay for both films, also stated in interviews that he could not think of a reason to keep Agent Macer in the second film, and that her character's story had already come full circle in the first installment. I am not sure if I fully agree on this opinion as her presence would add weight to this follow up. With that said Brolin and del Toro are both still in high form here and gives us great performances. But "Sicario: Day of the Soldado" is simply not as good as "Sicario", but there´s still value despite a weaker story and editing.

    A suicide bombing in a Kansas City grocery store kills fifteen people. The United States government responds by authorizing CIA officer Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) to apply extreme measures to combat Mexican drug cartels who are suspected of having smuggled the terrorists across the border. Graver and the Department of Defense decide the best option is to instigate a war between the major cartels, and Graver recruits black operative Alejandro Gillick (Benicio del Toro) for the mission. Gillick assassinates a high-profile lawyer of the Matamoros cartel in Mexico City while Graver and his team kidnap Isabel Reyes, the daughter of the kingpin of the Matamoros' rival, Carlos Reyes (who ordered the killing of Gillick's family in the previous film), in a false flag operation. Graver, Gillick, and their team take Isabel to Texas and stage a fake rescue with the help of the DEA and local police, trying to make her think she was kidnapped by her father's enemies. Gillick bonds with Isabel, and the team makes plans to transport her back to Mexico. They plan to leave her in territory controlled by her father's rivals to further escalate the inter-cartel conflict. However, after they cross into Mexico, the Mexican police escorts double-cross them and attack the American vehicles. Graver and his team kill 25 Mexican policemen to escape the ambush. Amidst the chaos, Isabel runs away into the desert. Gillick goes after her alone while the rest of the team returns to the United States. Meanwhile, the American government determines that at least two of the suicide bombers in Kansas City were actually domestic terrorists, not foreign nationals, and thus were not smuggled into the United States by the cartels. To quell tensions with Mexico, the Secretary of Defense orders the CIA to abandon the mission. Learning that Isabel witnessed the Americans shooting the Mexican police, the Secretary orders the team to erase all proof of American involvement by killing Isabel and Gillick. Graver in turn orders Gillick to kill Isabel, but Gillick refuses and turns rogue to keep her alive. Graver and his team fly covertly into Mexico, using a GPS device embedded in Isabel's shoe to find them. Gillick knows that if Isabel remains in Mexico, she will be killed. With few resources, he disguises them both as illegal immigrants and pays human traffickers to help them reenter the United States... Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "Though less subversive than its predecessor, Sicario: Day of the Soldado succeeds as a stylish, dynamic thriller—even if its amoral machismo makes for grim viewing." Variety's Peter Debruge called the film "tense, tough, and shockingly ruthless at times," and wrote, "Soldado may not be as masterful as Villeneuve's original, but it sets up a world of possibilities for elaborating on a complex conflict far too rich to be resolved in two hours' time." Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter praised the film as a "worthy, rough-and-tough sequel", highlighting the direction, lead performances and Sheridan's script, and saying "Sicario: Day of the Soldado emerges as a dynamic action drama in its own right." Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek found the film to be adequate, though lacking the presence of a character in the sequel as emotive as the one played by Emily Blunt in the original, stating: "There's not a Blunt in sight, though special task force macho men Matt Graver and Alejandro... return. This time their job is to stir up a war between rival Mexican drug cartels; part of the scheme involves kidnapping a drug lord's scrappy teenage daughter. Although she has enough teen-beat orneriness to kick both Matt's and Alejandro's butts, the movie doesn't let her." "Sicario: Day of the Soldado" is not as good as Denis Villeneu´s first film, but it has it´s moments for sure. The first film was by far a fantastic dark, brutal and very realistic piece of film. Denis Villeneuve could not return to direct this sequel due to scheduling conflicts with "Arrival" and "Blade Runner 2049". Nevertheless, I like the cinematography and the direction in this film as well and they have used similar sound structure from the first film, but the storyline is not as good as in "Sicario" I think. And without Emily Blunt a piece is missing in my book. Emily Blunt was originally attached to reprise her role as FBI Agent Kate Macer. However, director Stefano Sollima ultimately decided not to use Blunt or her character in the film, noting that Macer represented the moral compass in Sicario (2015), whereas he did not want any character to serve as moral guidance in the sequel. Screenwriter Taylor Sheridan, who wrote the story and screenplay for both films, also stated in interviews that he could not think of a reason to keep Agent Macer in the second film, and that her character's story had already come full circle in the first installment. I am not sure if I fully agree on this opinion as her presence would add weight to this follow up. With that said Brolin and del Toro are both still in high form here and gives us great performances. But "Sicario: Day of the Soldado" is simply not as good as "Sicario", but there´s still value despite a weaker story and editing.

  • Aug 13, 2019

    boring.....lots of hollywood convenience to make the plot work. I'm still trying to understand why he comes to find the kid at the end....makes no sense.

    boring.....lots of hollywood convenience to make the plot work. I'm still trying to understand why he comes to find the kid at the end....makes no sense.

  • Aug 04, 2019

    Just.... wow! Das whut I'm talkin bout mo fo's!!

    Just.... wow! Das whut I'm talkin bout mo fo's!!