Street People Reviews

  • Jun 05, 2016

    Roger Moore plays a Sicilian (!) tasked with uncovering the placement and removal of heroin inside a cross intended as a gift to a San Francisco church by a mob boss. Stacy Keach lends support as a Grand Prix driver who also dabbles as a troubleshooter (?) into such affairs that need to be kept low-key. Multi-national film that won't disappoint but may not have you hoping for more.

    Roger Moore plays a Sicilian (!) tasked with uncovering the placement and removal of heroin inside a cross intended as a gift to a San Francisco church by a mob boss. Stacy Keach lends support as a Grand Prix driver who also dabbles as a troubleshooter (?) into such affairs that need to be kept low-key. Multi-national film that won't disappoint but may not have you hoping for more.

  • May 17, 2014

    The set up has the makings of an excellent Italian 70s crime drama; a shipment of heroine is smuggled into San Francisco in a large crucifix that was a gift to the church from a local mafia boss. The mafia boss and the local syndicate are outraged someone would desiccate something so holy with their dirty business, so the mafia sets out to find out who did it. Unfortunately, the rest of the film doesn't work so well. Roger Moore is a half English, half Sicilian(?) accountant for the mob who works with his grand prix driver buddy, Stacy Keach, to uncover who's the real sacrilegious smuggler. This could have been a 70s grindhouse update of Fritz Lange's "M," but it's sadly all a pretty silly film that makes little sense, though it is peppered with some good action sequences and a Luis Bacalov score. Ernest Tidyman, screenwriter of "The French Connection," is one of the nine writers credited on the film.

    The set up has the makings of an excellent Italian 70s crime drama; a shipment of heroine is smuggled into San Francisco in a large crucifix that was a gift to the church from a local mafia boss. The mafia boss and the local syndicate are outraged someone would desiccate something so holy with their dirty business, so the mafia sets out to find out who did it. Unfortunately, the rest of the film doesn't work so well. Roger Moore is a half English, half Sicilian(?) accountant for the mob who works with his grand prix driver buddy, Stacy Keach, to uncover who's the real sacrilegious smuggler. This could have been a 70s grindhouse update of Fritz Lange's "M," but it's sadly all a pretty silly film that makes little sense, though it is peppered with some good action sequences and a Luis Bacalov score. Ernest Tidyman, screenwriter of "The French Connection," is one of the nine writers credited on the film.