Sucker Free City Reviews

  • Jan 20, 2020

    Would have made a great series which would provide the opportunity to flesh out more the story and characters. Acting was terrific.

    Would have made a great series which would provide the opportunity to flesh out more the story and characters. Acting was terrific.

  • May 29, 2012

    Nice "romantic" gangster movie. The romance is not showing the proper degree crime affect communities.

    Nice "romantic" gangster movie. The romance is not showing the proper degree crime affect communities.

  • Jul 02, 2011

    If you liked HBO's "The Wire", you'll love this. No sugar coating, no pandering, just a nice wholesome slice of some grade A certified reality.

    If you liked HBO's "The Wire", you'll love this. No sugar coating, no pandering, just a nice wholesome slice of some grade A certified reality.

  • Jun 05, 2011

    Love this movie by Spike Lee. He did a great job of putting through in this film of the different communities and tension of Hunters point, Chinatown and the Mission of San Francisco.

    Love this movie by Spike Lee. He did a great job of putting through in this film of the different communities and tension of Hunters point, Chinatown and the Mission of San Francisco.

  • May 24, 2011

    Nice lil gritty urban drama...

    Nice lil gritty urban drama...

  • Apr 14, 2011

    A very good but also underrated movie.

    A very good but also underrated movie.

  • Nov 23, 2010

    another solid movie from spike lee

    another solid movie from spike lee

  • Sep 12, 2010

    Great movie thats defiantly underrated

    Great movie thats defiantly underrated

  • Jun 15, 2009

    I didn't realize until after the fact that this was supposed to be a pilot to a passed-on Showtime series, which makes a long of sense, because as is, the story's incomplete. Still, there's a lot to like here, even if it can't break away from The Wire's brilliance and scale. Clearly, out of the three protagonists, Ken Leung gets the short shift, though he's probably the most interesting character. Curious to see where a series could've gone. A different note in the Spike Lee oeuvre, recognizable only by Lee's penchant for being overdramatic.

    I didn't realize until after the fact that this was supposed to be a pilot to a passed-on Showtime series, which makes a long of sense, because as is, the story's incomplete. Still, there's a lot to like here, even if it can't break away from The Wire's brilliance and scale. Clearly, out of the three protagonists, Ken Leung gets the short shift, though he's probably the most interesting character. Curious to see where a series could've gone. A different note in the Spike Lee oeuvre, recognizable only by Lee's penchant for being overdramatic.

  • Apr 08, 2009

    Originally shot as an extended pilot for a Showtime TV series (113 minute running time), it was instead released at the Toronto Film Festival in 2004 as its own movie when production on the series never began (a similar fate shared by the bastardized TV series turned direct- to-video movie, Cruel Intentions 2.) Given his past history of having such difficulty ending his films, one would think that the ongoing narrative of a television series would fit Spike Lee like a glove (I’ll resist the urge to work in an O.J. joke here). However, as displayed with the debacle of Sucker Free City, this is not the case. With what could best be described as “community college theatre meets Crash as a TV series set in gangland New York featuring the only semi-believable performance from that Chinese/ porcupine guy from X-Men 3,” (okay, maybe not “best described as”) “Sucker Free” has its fair share of problems. From an overabundance of Lee’s distracting double dolly shots to the embarrassing Wayne’s World product placement of his fictitious sports drink, “Da Bomb,” (Similarly, Kevin Smith uses “Nails Cigarettes,” a comparison I neglected to put in my paper) Lee incorporates plenty of his “trademarks” but “Sucker Free” lacks a personal voice on the account of the director not having penned it himself. Personally, I miss the writer/ director Spike Lee, before he became a commercial sellout (same with Robert Zemeckis, Martin Scorsese and a host of other once prolific talents who have reduced themselves to mere directors). When helming someone else’s script, Lee can incorporate as many of his “trademarks” as he wants to, but that doesn’t make it a “Spike Lee Joint.” I would much rather prefer a muddled, personal “written and directed by” School Daze than a polished, impersonal “directed by” 25th Hour.

    Originally shot as an extended pilot for a Showtime TV series (113 minute running time), it was instead released at the Toronto Film Festival in 2004 as its own movie when production on the series never began (a similar fate shared by the bastardized TV series turned direct- to-video movie, Cruel Intentions 2.) Given his past history of having such difficulty ending his films, one would think that the ongoing narrative of a television series would fit Spike Lee like a glove (I’ll resist the urge to work in an O.J. joke here). However, as displayed with the debacle of Sucker Free City, this is not the case. With what could best be described as “community college theatre meets Crash as a TV series set in gangland New York featuring the only semi-believable performance from that Chinese/ porcupine guy from X-Men 3,” (okay, maybe not “best described as”) “Sucker Free” has its fair share of problems. From an overabundance of Lee’s distracting double dolly shots to the embarrassing Wayne’s World product placement of his fictitious sports drink, “Da Bomb,” (Similarly, Kevin Smith uses “Nails Cigarettes,” a comparison I neglected to put in my paper) Lee incorporates plenty of his “trademarks” but “Sucker Free” lacks a personal voice on the account of the director not having penned it himself. Personally, I miss the writer/ director Spike Lee, before he became a commercial sellout (same with Robert Zemeckis, Martin Scorsese and a host of other once prolific talents who have reduced themselves to mere directors). When helming someone else’s script, Lee can incorporate as many of his “trademarks” as he wants to, but that doesn’t make it a “Spike Lee Joint.” I would much rather prefer a muddled, personal “written and directed by” School Daze than a polished, impersonal “directed by” 25th Hour.