Sybil Reviews

  • Feb 21, 2020

    Bestest movie ever. my most favorte. could relate with sybil so much....

    Bestest movie ever. my most favorte. could relate with sybil so much....

  • Feb 07, 2017

    "Past is present if you carry it with you." No, this wasn't said by a famous philosopher or psychologist, but by Sybil Dorsett, the main character of Joseph Sargent's 2007 film Sybil. This film, based on the 1973 book of the same name, examines Sybil's case in a way that will make you empathize with the mentally ill on a whole new level. We meet Sybil Dorsett as a young art student in New York City during the late 1950s. Right off the bat, it's apparent that something isn't right with Sybil. She leaves during the middle of her class to Philadelphia, due to what we believe to be embarassment. After she tells her university's psychologist that she doesn't know why she went to Philadelphia he diagnoses her with female hysteria and refers her to Dr. Cornelia Wilbur. As Sybil meets with Dr. Wilbur, she confesses that she experiences frequent blackouts and cannot recall large periods of time. Dr. Wilbur helps Sybil recover a childhood memory where she was physically, emotionally, and sexually abused by her mother. Eventually, several different personalities with different ages and names emerge from inside Sybil. To Dr. Wilbur's dismay, her associates believe that she influenced Sybil to create the different identities. The end of the film shows the house of Shirley Mason, who, up until now, was known as Sybil Dorsett. Sybil is quite the rollercoaster of a main character. When she was first introduced in the movie, I felt sorry for her due to her frequent blackouts. Imagine only being able to play piano while you're blacked out; this is the life of Sybil. When she starts seeing Dr. Wilbur, and her multiple personalities emerge, I started to dislike Sybil because of her anger personality, otherwise known as Peggy Lou. Mainly because this version of Sybil is very rude and aggressive, and I didn't find it particularly necessary to break the glass several times in Dr. Wilbur's office. My favorite of Sybil's personalities though, was Sid, her male personality in the movie. The little tough guy Bostonian accent paired with Sybil's irrational actions based on her perspective of how the males around her act is just all too perfect. When Mary meets Dr. Wilbur, this is when I start to wonder "what happened in this poor woman's life to make her act like this?" From her obvious hallucinations of her dead mother, to the strange whimpering noises she makes, to the grotesque looking contortions she makes while experiencing these hallucinations- it's pretty clear something really messed up happened during her childhood. The change in accents and genuine change in behavior is all too cute, and even if you don't like Sybil herself, you're bound to relate one of the sixteen characters inside of her. I just wish that the movie was longer so there was sufficient character development for each personality. Dr. Cornelia Wilbur was another interesting character that was hard for me to dislike. Being that we know that dissociative identity disorder is a legitimate mental disorder now, I felt her frustration when all of her colleagues believed that she made Sybil create her several personalities, and that Sybil was just suffering from simple "female hysteria". The setting definitely takes a key role here: had the movie taken place during a slightly later time period, Dr.Wilbur most likely would have had more success convincing her colleagues of her groundbreaking discovery. I like how she is very sincere and gentle with Sybil, as well as with Sybil's multiple identities, even when Sybil herself is not being so gentle. The only thing that sort of threw me off was the cryptic serial killer like music that played most of the time whilst Sybil was recalling her past. I liked how it wasn't confusing to distinguish the timeline in the movie from the constant flashbacks to Sybil's past.The ending of the movies was pretty anticlimactic and abrupt. I think the movie could have been a little longer, showing more of how Sybil behaves when she comes to terms with all her personalities and realizes she has an illness. I also don't like how it revealed the identity of Sybil Dorsett to be Shirley Mason, destroying the anonymity that had been preserved by the previous adaptation for 31 years. I would recommend this film to anyone that is interested in Sigmund Freud and the psychodynamic perspective, or anyone studying psychoanalysis. - Kaden Jones

    "Past is present if you carry it with you." No, this wasn't said by a famous philosopher or psychologist, but by Sybil Dorsett, the main character of Joseph Sargent's 2007 film Sybil. This film, based on the 1973 book of the same name, examines Sybil's case in a way that will make you empathize with the mentally ill on a whole new level. We meet Sybil Dorsett as a young art student in New York City during the late 1950s. Right off the bat, it's apparent that something isn't right with Sybil. She leaves during the middle of her class to Philadelphia, due to what we believe to be embarassment. After she tells her university's psychologist that she doesn't know why she went to Philadelphia he diagnoses her with female hysteria and refers her to Dr. Cornelia Wilbur. As Sybil meets with Dr. Wilbur, she confesses that she experiences frequent blackouts and cannot recall large periods of time. Dr. Wilbur helps Sybil recover a childhood memory where she was physically, emotionally, and sexually abused by her mother. Eventually, several different personalities with different ages and names emerge from inside Sybil. To Dr. Wilbur's dismay, her associates believe that she influenced Sybil to create the different identities. The end of the film shows the house of Shirley Mason, who, up until now, was known as Sybil Dorsett. Sybil is quite the rollercoaster of a main character. When she was first introduced in the movie, I felt sorry for her due to her frequent blackouts. Imagine only being able to play piano while you're blacked out; this is the life of Sybil. When she starts seeing Dr. Wilbur, and her multiple personalities emerge, I started to dislike Sybil because of her anger personality, otherwise known as Peggy Lou. Mainly because this version of Sybil is very rude and aggressive, and I didn't find it particularly necessary to break the glass several times in Dr. Wilbur's office. My favorite of Sybil's personalities though, was Sid, her male personality in the movie. The little tough guy Bostonian accent paired with Sybil's irrational actions based on her perspective of how the males around her act is just all too perfect. When Mary meets Dr. Wilbur, this is when I start to wonder "what happened in this poor woman's life to make her act like this?" From her obvious hallucinations of her dead mother, to the strange whimpering noises she makes, to the grotesque looking contortions she makes while experiencing these hallucinations- it's pretty clear something really messed up happened during her childhood. The change in accents and genuine change in behavior is all too cute, and even if you don't like Sybil herself, you're bound to relate one of the sixteen characters inside of her. I just wish that the movie was longer so there was sufficient character development for each personality. Dr. Cornelia Wilbur was another interesting character that was hard for me to dislike. Being that we know that dissociative identity disorder is a legitimate mental disorder now, I felt her frustration when all of her colleagues believed that she made Sybil create her several personalities, and that Sybil was just suffering from simple "female hysteria". The setting definitely takes a key role here: had the movie taken place during a slightly later time period, Dr.Wilbur most likely would have had more success convincing her colleagues of her groundbreaking discovery. I like how she is very sincere and gentle with Sybil, as well as with Sybil's multiple identities, even when Sybil herself is not being so gentle. The only thing that sort of threw me off was the cryptic serial killer like music that played most of the time whilst Sybil was recalling her past. I liked how it wasn't confusing to distinguish the timeline in the movie from the constant flashbacks to Sybil's past.The ending of the movies was pretty anticlimactic and abrupt. I think the movie could have been a little longer, showing more of how Sybil behaves when she comes to terms with all her personalities and realizes she has an illness. I also don't like how it revealed the identity of Sybil Dorsett to be Shirley Mason, destroying the anonymity that had been preserved by the previous adaptation for 31 years. I would recommend this film to anyone that is interested in Sigmund Freud and the psychodynamic perspective, or anyone studying psychoanalysis. - Kaden Jones

  • Nov 28, 2016

    Great adaptation, almost loyal.

    Great adaptation, almost loyal.

  • Oct 11, 2016

    From the best movies I had seen actually

    From the best movies I had seen actually

  • Sep 03, 2016

    It's firm and has flat spots. Best to forget this and stick to the original miniseries.

    It's firm and has flat spots. Best to forget this and stick to the original miniseries.

  • Jul 19, 2014

    An interesting perspective into multiple personality disorder. Not entirely real life.The colleagues play a larger role in the councilor's life in this version of the movie. Also the trauma is less dramatic than the first movie. A bit of a quicker solution in this version.

    An interesting perspective into multiple personality disorder. Not entirely real life.The colleagues play a larger role in the councilor's life in this version of the movie. Also the trauma is less dramatic than the first movie. A bit of a quicker solution in this version.

  • Sep 18, 2012

    the main actors did well... but it felt rushed... downloading the 1976 version now :)

    the main actors did well... but it felt rushed... downloading the 1976 version now :)

  • Lucas M Super Reviewer
    Jul 28, 2012

    Shocking and one of the best remakes ever!

    Shocking and one of the best remakes ever!

  • Feb 18, 2012

    I actually thought this version was better than the Sally Field version. I read the book a couple years ago and really enjoyed it and didn't even know they made a movie. In comparison, I thought ally Field did amazing especially for it being so long ago but this version had more of the book in it and they showed more of the personalities. Also, the personalities in this version were actually a variance of ages and not all children like the previous. I also liked how they tied in the real "Sybil's" story because it is based on a real woman. Tammy Blanchard really did an amazing job herself. I know I said Sally did better but only by a margin. I really think I like how they went about the story in this version. If I were to recommend one of the two I would probably recommend this one though Sally Fields performance is worth watching.

    I actually thought this version was better than the Sally Field version. I read the book a couple years ago and really enjoyed it and didn't even know they made a movie. In comparison, I thought ally Field did amazing especially for it being so long ago but this version had more of the book in it and they showed more of the personalities. Also, the personalities in this version were actually a variance of ages and not all children like the previous. I also liked how they tied in the real "Sybil's" story because it is based on a real woman. Tammy Blanchard really did an amazing job herself. I know I said Sally did better but only by a margin. I really think I like how they went about the story in this version. If I were to recommend one of the two I would probably recommend this one though Sally Fields performance is worth watching.

  • Sep 08, 2011

    I miss this...I miss my Psychology classes.

    I miss this...I miss my Psychology classes.