The Adventures of Tintin Reviews

  • Jul 27, 2020

    Fucking load of shite

    Fucking load of shite

  • Jun 24, 2020

    The animation is flawless (in a technical way), but doesn't work sometimes (I rather prefer the cartoonish style of the bande dessinée originale) in the facial expressions of some characters (like the protagonist), although the story and sense of adventure is mastered by the great Steven Spielberg. Finally, people should read the original Hergé BD to have some idea of comparison and acknowledge.

    The animation is flawless (in a technical way), but doesn't work sometimes (I rather prefer the cartoonish style of the bande dessinée originale) in the facial expressions of some characters (like the protagonist), although the story and sense of adventure is mastered by the great Steven Spielberg. Finally, people should read the original Hergé BD to have some idea of comparison and acknowledge.

  • Jun 21, 2020

    Steven Spielberg is one of the greatest names in Hollywood, and when he took the helm of Nickelodeon's cinematic adaptation of The Adventures of TinTin, he proved once more why he holds such a positive reputation. The movie is a family friendly action flick with just enough action to appease both kids and their parents. And thanks to the release of the original cartoon on which it was based–thanks to the good people at Shout! Factory–audiences who really want the full experience of this classic character can really get it. Nickelodeon, Steven Speilberg, and the writers behind this adaptation of Tintin have crafted a movie that's one part Indiana Jones and one part Pirates of the Caribbean. Simply put, it's a great example of everything that's right with action films and family films. Sure, it's got fight scenes. But none of them are too violent for audiences of any age. It's just a great turn off your brain movie that kids and their parents can enjoy together. The premise of the story is simple. BY mere chance, Tintin finds a model ship one day in the market as he's strolling around. He buys it, not knowing it has a scroll hidden on it. This ship (and scroll) lead to the ensuing adventure. Because he's seen buying the ship, he's kidnapped by the henchmen of the evil Sakharine, who is the descendant of an evil pirate. Sakharine wants the scroll, and will stop at NOTHING to get it, so that he can disocver the whereabouts of a treasure that was on board a ship his ancestor plundered. Tie in an elderly pickpocket, and audiences get plenty of action and laughs from start to finish, even leaving the door open for a sequel. Would a sequel be necessary here? No. Definitely not. But thanks to the release of the original cartoon–thanks to Shout! Factory–audiences will now get to enjoy all of Tintin's adventures. Perhaps the only questionable aspect of the entire movie is Captain Haddock's alcoholism. Some ultra sensitive parents might moan and complain about this. But in the movie's defense, Tintin does get Captain Haddock to sober up. He continuoulsy brings up that drinking is a bad thing. So kudos to all involved for bringing that message to young audiences. Speaking of Captain Haddock, some of the story's funniest moments come from him. Whether it be from physical humor or from one liners tossed in, the writers gave him more than enough material to make him a funny, loveable character. Tintin's dog, Snowy, provides his own funny moments throughout the movie, too. It seems that just like Tintin, Snowy's always getting into some kind of trouble. And those moments are what make for plenty of laughs. The Adventures of Tintin is loaded with great moments and great characters. But they alone didn't make the movie. Typically, motion capture (and cg-based) movies are anything but creative in their style. That's obvious across the board in most movies of this style. And true, one can't help but make comparisons to the likes of The Polar Express in Tintin's presentation. But there's something about it that sets it apart from The Polar Express and other movies done in similar fashion. The work done on this movie was so precise, one can only wonder what it would have looked like had there it been done in a live-action format, rather than cg-based. But probably using motion capture as its basis probably did save a certain amount on hiring stunt people, among other costs. All of that aside, after the so-so movie that was Rango, Nickelodeon has undoubtedly struck gold with this great piece of family entertainment. One can only hope it won't take that as a cue to be the next Disney/Pixar and start shoving out heartless sequel after sequel just to make more money. Until that happens, kudos to Nicklelodeon, and all involved, for what was definitely one of the best family movies of 2011.

    Steven Spielberg is one of the greatest names in Hollywood, and when he took the helm of Nickelodeon's cinematic adaptation of The Adventures of TinTin, he proved once more why he holds such a positive reputation. The movie is a family friendly action flick with just enough action to appease both kids and their parents. And thanks to the release of the original cartoon on which it was based–thanks to the good people at Shout! Factory–audiences who really want the full experience of this classic character can really get it. Nickelodeon, Steven Speilberg, and the writers behind this adaptation of Tintin have crafted a movie that's one part Indiana Jones and one part Pirates of the Caribbean. Simply put, it's a great example of everything that's right with action films and family films. Sure, it's got fight scenes. But none of them are too violent for audiences of any age. It's just a great turn off your brain movie that kids and their parents can enjoy together. The premise of the story is simple. BY mere chance, Tintin finds a model ship one day in the market as he's strolling around. He buys it, not knowing it has a scroll hidden on it. This ship (and scroll) lead to the ensuing adventure. Because he's seen buying the ship, he's kidnapped by the henchmen of the evil Sakharine, who is the descendant of an evil pirate. Sakharine wants the scroll, and will stop at NOTHING to get it, so that he can disocver the whereabouts of a treasure that was on board a ship his ancestor plundered. Tie in an elderly pickpocket, and audiences get plenty of action and laughs from start to finish, even leaving the door open for a sequel. Would a sequel be necessary here? No. Definitely not. But thanks to the release of the original cartoon–thanks to Shout! Factory–audiences will now get to enjoy all of Tintin's adventures. Perhaps the only questionable aspect of the entire movie is Captain Haddock's alcoholism. Some ultra sensitive parents might moan and complain about this. But in the movie's defense, Tintin does get Captain Haddock to sober up. He continuoulsy brings up that drinking is a bad thing. So kudos to all involved for bringing that message to young audiences. Speaking of Captain Haddock, some of the story's funniest moments come from him. Whether it be from physical humor or from one liners tossed in, the writers gave him more than enough material to make him a funny, loveable character. Tintin's dog, Snowy, provides his own funny moments throughout the movie, too. It seems that just like Tintin, Snowy's always getting into some kind of trouble. And those moments are what make for plenty of laughs. The Adventures of Tintin is loaded with great moments and great characters. But they alone didn't make the movie. Typically, motion capture (and cg-based) movies are anything but creative in their style. That's obvious across the board in most movies of this style. And true, one can't help but make comparisons to the likes of The Polar Express in Tintin's presentation. But there's something about it that sets it apart from The Polar Express and other movies done in similar fashion. The work done on this movie was so precise, one can only wonder what it would have looked like had there it been done in a live-action format, rather than cg-based. But probably using motion capture as its basis probably did save a certain amount on hiring stunt people, among other costs. All of that aside, after the so-so movie that was Rango, Nickelodeon has undoubtedly struck gold with this great piece of family entertainment. One can only hope it won't take that as a cue to be the next Disney/Pixar and start shoving out heartless sequel after sequel just to make more money. Until that happens, kudos to Nicklelodeon, and all involved, for what was definitely one of the best family movies of 2011.

  • Jun 10, 2020

    Who doesn't like Tintin? Look back at the good ol' days and Join the adventure with Epic Action and Amusing Animation Film. The visual is just astonishing

    Who doesn't like Tintin? Look back at the good ol' days and Join the adventure with Epic Action and Amusing Animation Film. The visual is just astonishing

  • May 25, 2020

    a very good experience, very good action and unforgettable animation, perfectly achieved by spielberg

    a very good experience, very good action and unforgettable animation, perfectly achieved by spielberg

  • May 12, 2020

    A classic feel of Steven Spielberg. The Adventures of Tintin bring a great story, great animation, and wonderful camera movements. The action of the movie feels environmentally entertaining. The characters were a instant favorite to me, and the dialogue of Tintin was keeping the ship afloat. The dog always has a spark for me, and Captain Haddock's drunkenness keeps it alive. Even though it shows the same layout of a story, the characters (including the dog) and the action keep it together. The storytelling explains the details, and Steven Spielberg shines in a camera work, action, and action-humor. Most people may disagree with me, but me seeing this at a young age, it definitely stuck with me. 9/10

    A classic feel of Steven Spielberg. The Adventures of Tintin bring a great story, great animation, and wonderful camera movements. The action of the movie feels environmentally entertaining. The characters were a instant favorite to me, and the dialogue of Tintin was keeping the ship afloat. The dog always has a spark for me, and Captain Haddock's drunkenness keeps it alive. Even though it shows the same layout of a story, the characters (including the dog) and the action keep it together. The storytelling explains the details, and Steven Spielberg shines in a camera work, action, and action-humor. Most people may disagree with me, but me seeing this at a young age, it definitely stuck with me. 9/10

  • May 03, 2020

    I just saw this movie (2 May, 2020) and it made it to one of my all-time favorites list (along with Peter Jackson's King Kong, The Frighteners, The Shadow, and most of the Marvel Studios films). Tintin is a wholesome, adventurous character who I quickly grew to like, and his sidekick/pet Snowy endeared himself to me too (and I'm not really a pet person). The animated style was quite appealing. I truly enjoyed this movie and am very grateful for all the expertise and artistic excellence that went into making this very well thought-out movie. Highly recommend it.

    I just saw this movie (2 May, 2020) and it made it to one of my all-time favorites list (along with Peter Jackson's King Kong, The Frighteners, The Shadow, and most of the Marvel Studios films). Tintin is a wholesome, adventurous character who I quickly grew to like, and his sidekick/pet Snowy endeared himself to me too (and I'm not really a pet person). The animated style was quite appealing. I truly enjoyed this movie and am very grateful for all the expertise and artistic excellence that went into making this very well thought-out movie. Highly recommend it.

  • Apr 26, 2020

    Funny and very charming. A very good film for younger children yet still enjoyable for adults.

    Funny and very charming. A very good film for younger children yet still enjoyable for adults.

  • Apr 24, 2020

    If you like Tintin, or fast-paced action movies, or Steven Spielberg's work, it'll be noticably hard to hate this movie.

    If you like Tintin, or fast-paced action movies, or Steven Spielberg's work, it'll be noticably hard to hate this movie.

  • Apr 23, 2020

    A thrilling adventure with stunning visual effects and action sequences, a great voice cast and an engaging narrative that shows Steven Spielberg at his best.

    A thrilling adventure with stunning visual effects and action sequences, a great voice cast and an engaging narrative that shows Steven Spielberg at his best.