The Dam Busters Reviews

  • Dec 13, 2020

    It's a classic, about an important raid of ww2. Abit dated by today's standards perhaps but it's an important part of the history. Although it doesn't exactly posses that star quality. There are other ww2 films that you could watch that are much better. Like 'The great escape' But it's not a bad watch to see how they did it. Although not all the information is in this film and when it was made much of it was still classified The music and the damn busters theme is probably the most notable part of the film. All in all, it's not a bad film.

    It's a classic, about an important raid of ww2. Abit dated by today's standards perhaps but it's an important part of the history. Although it doesn't exactly posses that star quality. There are other ww2 films that you could watch that are much better. Like 'The great escape' But it's not a bad watch to see how they did it. Although not all the information is in this film and when it was made much of it was still classified The music and the damn busters theme is probably the most notable part of the film. All in all, it's not a bad film.

  • Nov 15, 2020

    One of the greatest world war 2 movies. It avoids too much sentimentality and brings to life not only the spirit of these great men, but if also vividly captures the tension of the mission. Exceptional.

    One of the greatest world war 2 movies. It avoids too much sentimentality and brings to life not only the spirit of these great men, but if also vividly captures the tension of the mission. Exceptional.

  • Oct 31, 2020

    Going through classic films, I often find myself agreeing with critics in most circumstances, but not so with The Dam Busters. While beloved in British households, the film has aged very poorly and is an absolute slog; I can only imagine a shared sense of patriotism was responsible for buoying the film's reputation to the modern day. Slow, unengaging, and unexciting, the films seems to have a winning premise (the development of a technological advancement that few believe in, and the clandestine training of a specialty unit to deploy it against the Nazi war machine), but develops little empathy for its characters and focuses far too much time on individual scenes than necessary; fifteen minutes or so could have been shaved off relatively easily. The special effects may have been strong for the time, and can hardly be criticized in that regard as the production team did the best with what was available, though they are noticeably antiquated. Can hardly call this one a film for the ages. (2.5/5)

    Going through classic films, I often find myself agreeing with critics in most circumstances, but not so with The Dam Busters. While beloved in British households, the film has aged very poorly and is an absolute slog; I can only imagine a shared sense of patriotism was responsible for buoying the film's reputation to the modern day. Slow, unengaging, and unexciting, the films seems to have a winning premise (the development of a technological advancement that few believe in, and the clandestine training of a specialty unit to deploy it against the Nazi war machine), but develops little empathy for its characters and focuses far too much time on individual scenes than necessary; fifteen minutes or so could have been shaved off relatively easily. The special effects may have been strong for the time, and can hardly be criticized in that regard as the production team did the best with what was available, though they are noticeably antiquated. Can hardly call this one a film for the ages. (2.5/5)

  • Jul 22, 2020

    Although there is no denying that there is a great story to be told here and some genuinely thrilling moments, this movie has not aged very well.

    Although there is no denying that there is a great story to be told here and some genuinely thrilling moments, this movie has not aged very well.

  • Apr 19, 2019

    Excellent film, the acting in this film was superb. The film is well worth a watch.

    Excellent film, the acting in this film was superb. The film is well worth a watch.

  • Jan 25, 2019

    Michael Redgraveâ(TM)s wartime inventor Wallis is hard at work to make a âbouncingâ? bomb that will destroy well-protected Nazi dams in western Germany â" so hard at work that he is obsessed. But he keeps facing setback after setback. This isnâ(TM)t the film I thought I was going to watch but it is intriguing; the bombs are shown as animated black blobs (which turns out to be because even in 1954 their actual design was a state secret). Eventually, of course, Wallis gets the design right but then it is up to the RAF to learn how to drop these special bombs from a distance of 600m and a height of only 60m. Guy Gibson (Richard Todd) is chosen to lead the squadron as they train for this difficult task and also come up with some unique methods. This is a very task-focused agentic movie â" little time for character development. Wallis has a tolerant wife and Gibson has a doting black lab (whose name is the unfortunate N-word â"I was shocked but this is the racist UK in 1950s). As they struggle to get the bomb right and the training runs accurate, time is running out because the bombs need to be dropped when the dams and the moon are both full â" on a particular day in May. And then, the mission is on and, wow, this turns out to be where George Lucas got his ideas for the attack on the Death Star in Star Wars (1977). The same shots of the squadron members in their planes, the same banter between pilots/crew, and the same difficult shot to make to win. Not everyone makes it home. Strangely compelling in its obsession with this one particular goal but also I drifted in some of the many moments of aircraft flying...

    Michael Redgraveâ(TM)s wartime inventor Wallis is hard at work to make a âbouncingâ? bomb that will destroy well-protected Nazi dams in western Germany â" so hard at work that he is obsessed. But he keeps facing setback after setback. This isnâ(TM)t the film I thought I was going to watch but it is intriguing; the bombs are shown as animated black blobs (which turns out to be because even in 1954 their actual design was a state secret). Eventually, of course, Wallis gets the design right but then it is up to the RAF to learn how to drop these special bombs from a distance of 600m and a height of only 60m. Guy Gibson (Richard Todd) is chosen to lead the squadron as they train for this difficult task and also come up with some unique methods. This is a very task-focused agentic movie â" little time for character development. Wallis has a tolerant wife and Gibson has a doting black lab (whose name is the unfortunate N-word â"I was shocked but this is the racist UK in 1950s). As they struggle to get the bomb right and the training runs accurate, time is running out because the bombs need to be dropped when the dams and the moon are both full â" on a particular day in May. And then, the mission is on and, wow, this turns out to be where George Lucas got his ideas for the attack on the Death Star in Star Wars (1977). The same shots of the squadron members in their planes, the same banter between pilots/crew, and the same difficult shot to make to win. Not everyone makes it home. Strangely compelling in its obsession with this one particular goal but also I drifted in some of the many moments of aircraft flying...

  • Apr 25, 2018

    Classic WW2 drama. 1942. British inventor Barnes Wallis is struggling with the task of finding a way of destroying the dams in the Ruhr valley. Breaching these dams will significantly reduce Germany's military production, especially steel. He hits upon a method but struggles to find any government department to endorse it. Will his idea get off the ground? Classic WW2 drama. Based on the true story, the movie shows well the process inventing the bomb took, Barnes Wallis's struggles to get the project approved, preparations to attack the dams and the heroism and sacrifice involved in completing the operation. Good work by Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis and Richard Todd as Wing Commander Guy Gibson. Solid supporting cast. Received an Oscar nomination for special effects, though watching this in 2018 that fact might raise a chuckle. The explosions of the bombs against the dams, in particular, are very unrealistic, though at the time would have been the best the director could have managed.

    Classic WW2 drama. 1942. British inventor Barnes Wallis is struggling with the task of finding a way of destroying the dams in the Ruhr valley. Breaching these dams will significantly reduce Germany's military production, especially steel. He hits upon a method but struggles to find any government department to endorse it. Will his idea get off the ground? Classic WW2 drama. Based on the true story, the movie shows well the process inventing the bomb took, Barnes Wallis's struggles to get the project approved, preparations to attack the dams and the heroism and sacrifice involved in completing the operation. Good work by Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis and Richard Todd as Wing Commander Guy Gibson. Solid supporting cast. Received an Oscar nomination for special effects, though watching this in 2018 that fact might raise a chuckle. The explosions of the bombs against the dams, in particular, are very unrealistic, though at the time would have been the best the director could have managed.

  • Nov 11, 2017

    Made in 1955 when many participants in the raid were still alive and using Lancaster bombers of the type used in the raid which were in storage, this movie depicts one of the most dramatic and terrifying special raids carried out against Nazi Germany by the Royal Air Force. The screenwriters have followed the story which is so dramatic it doesn't need much spin to make this a nail biting action film. The real personalities of the key people are also colorful enough that the actors follow their words and actions. One of the few World War Two movies that has an authentic feel. 40% of the air crew on the raid were killed. The famous, yet in real life sort of jerk, Wing Commander Guy Gibson died in an air crash toward the end of the war. Barnes Wallis who designed the bouncing bombs which broke the German dams was haunted by the number of young British aircrew killed in the raid for the rest of his life.

    Made in 1955 when many participants in the raid were still alive and using Lancaster bombers of the type used in the raid which were in storage, this movie depicts one of the most dramatic and terrifying special raids carried out against Nazi Germany by the Royal Air Force. The screenwriters have followed the story which is so dramatic it doesn't need much spin to make this a nail biting action film. The real personalities of the key people are also colorful enough that the actors follow their words and actions. One of the few World War Two movies that has an authentic feel. 40% of the air crew on the raid were killed. The famous, yet in real life sort of jerk, Wing Commander Guy Gibson died in an air crash toward the end of the war. Barnes Wallis who designed the bouncing bombs which broke the German dams was haunted by the number of young British aircrew killed in the raid for the rest of his life.

  • Sep 26, 2017

    A classic film about the Invention of the bouncing bomb. The special effects are pretty lame but it's a very British film and the music is fantastic. Great film.

    A classic film about the Invention of the bouncing bomb. The special effects are pretty lame but it's a very British film and the music is fantastic. Great film.

  • Dec 03, 2016

    I saw this classic at The Zonita on 12th November 2016. It was shown as part of the Remembrance Sunday memorial. It is of its time and yet it remains moving and exciting and, yes, the special effects are rubbish, but Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis is brilliant as is Richard Todd as Guy Gibson. I have forgotten how many times I have seen this - and despite a few technical problems, the print The Zonita showed was the best I have seen. Of course it is well known that because the bouncing bomb was still on the secret list in 1954, some of the film is not accurate but it does not matter. I have read that Peter Jackson wants to do a remake, I think that is a good idea but he will need to get someone who is the equal to Redgrave to paly Barnes Wallis

    I saw this classic at The Zonita on 12th November 2016. It was shown as part of the Remembrance Sunday memorial. It is of its time and yet it remains moving and exciting and, yes, the special effects are rubbish, but Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis is brilliant as is Richard Todd as Guy Gibson. I have forgotten how many times I have seen this - and despite a few technical problems, the print The Zonita showed was the best I have seen. Of course it is well known that because the bouncing bomb was still on the secret list in 1954, some of the film is not accurate but it does not matter. I have read that Peter Jackson wants to do a remake, I think that is a good idea but he will need to get someone who is the equal to Redgrave to paly Barnes Wallis