The Mummy (2017) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Mummy (2017)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Lacking the campy fun of the franchise's most recent entries and failing to deliver many monster-movie thrills, The Mummy suggests a speedy unraveling for the Dark Universe.

Tickets & Showtimes

The Mummy Videos

The Mummy Photos

Movie Info

Tom Cruise headlines a spectacular, all-new cinematic version of the legend that has fascinated cultures all over the world since the dawn of civilization: The Mummy. Thought safely entombed in a tomb deep beneath the unforgiving desert, an ancient princess (Sofia Boutella of Kingsman: The Secret Service and Star Trek Beyond) whose destiny was unjustly taken from her is awakened in our current day, bringing with her malevolence grown over millennia and terrors that defy human comprehension. From the sweeping sands of the Middle East through hidden labyrinths under modern-day London, The Mummy brings a surprising intensity and balance of wonder and thrills in an imaginative new take that ushers in a new world of gods and monsters. Cruise is joined by a cast including Annabelle Wallis (upcoming King Arthur, television's Peaky Blinders), Jake Johnson (Jurassic World), Courtney B. Vance (TV's American Crime Story: The People V. O.J. Simpson) and Oscar (R) winner Russell Crowe (Gladiator). The creative team on this action-adventure event is led by director/producer Alex Kurtzman and producer Chris Morgan, who have been instrumental in growing some of the most successful franchises of the past several years-with Kurtzman writing or producing entries in the Transformers, Star Trek and Mission: Impossible series, and Morgan being the narrative engineer of the Fast & Furious saga as it has experienced explosive growth from its third chapter on. Sean Daniel, who produced the most recent Mummy trilogy, produces alongside Kurtzman and Morgan.

Watch it now

Cast

Tom Cruise
as Nick Morton
Russell Crowe
as Dr. Henry Jekyll
Annabelle Wallis
as Jenny Halsey
Courtney B. Vance
as Col. Greenway
Sean Cameron Michael
as Archaeologist
Rez Kempton
as Construction Manager
James Arama
as Second Man
Sohm Kapila
as Reporters
Erol Ismail
as Ahmanet's Warrior
Selva Rasalingham
as King Menehptre
Shanina Shaik
as Arabian Princess
Neil Maskell
as Dr. Whemple
Andrew Brooke
as Mr. Brooke (Emergency Worker)
Grace Chilton
as Woman in Toilet
Hannah Ankrah
as Woman in Toilet
Show More Cast

News & Interviews for The Mummy

Critic Reviews for The Mummy

All Critics (239) | Top Critics (42)

It feels less like a movie than a series of compromises worked out by a corporate committee.

August 3, 2017 | Rating: 0.5/4 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Alex Kurtzman's The Mummy reboots a franchise I would gladly have dispensed with from the start.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: D+ | Full Review…

As the beginning of an ongoing series, it's an utter bore, one with only the faintest grasp of what made Universal's monster pictures so iconic all those decades ago.

June 9, 2017 | Full Review…

You only have to watch the trailer to know that Producer-Director Alex Kurtzman's reboot of Brendan Fraser's once-charming mummy movies is full of embalming fluid.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…

The Mummy promises a fantastical world of supernatural beings colliding and collaborating, forgetting that if no one cares about any one of these beings in particular, they're not going to be sold on seeing them together, either.

June 9, 2017 | Full Review…

The Mummy is a mess, a movie in such a hurry to introduce more monsters under Universal's "Dark Universe" banner that it comes awkwardly wrapped in impenetrable layers of exposition.

June 9, 2017 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Mummy

½

There's a great airplane-going-down sequence early on in The Mummy that promises one helluva thrill ride of a movie, and indeed, there are a coupla scenes that match it. But halfway in Russell Crowe has the unfortunate task of delivering the lines: "I'm Doctor Jekyll," after which the movie, like the plane crash mentioned before, careens out of control and into more and more unbelievable territory that'll leave you shaking your head in stupidity. All this, and the first Tom Cruise movie I've seen wherein it felt as if he wasn't in control. One half good movie, and then one half schlock, interesting for just that reason.

Kevin M. Williams
Kevin M. Williams

Super Reviewer

Alex Kurtzman's The Mummy unravels into mediocrity. Unearthing at 110 minutes, The Mummy manages to explain more than enough, while moving at a comfortable steady pace. With that said, despite the fact that the film goes down a horror suspense path, rather than a campy fun one, The Mummy fails to deliver on the scares or thrills. The surprises are few and the main plot details of the film are predictable. The CG is hit and miss. It gets the job done without hitting anything out of the ball park. The action is stale, also leaving nothing to remember. Tom Cruise is the life of the film, but not a show stealer. Everyone else is underutilized, like Sofia Boutella, or out of place, like Jake Johnson. Annabelle Wallis and Russell Crowe blend in with the rest of the picture. The Mummy has its place in the dark universe; there just isn't much of an impact.

JY Skacto
JY Skacto

Super Reviewer

½

In my many years as a film critic, it's always interesting to discover when I veer from the critical herd, whether liking a movie others do not or having issues with a movie that others lionize like La La Land. After seeing an avalanche of bad reviews, I was fully prepared to dismiss Tom Cruise's The Mummy as another example of Hollywood hubris, but as the movie continued I found myself enjoying the proceedings. I left the theater completely dumbfounded why my critical brethren disliked it so vehemently. One critic even said this was Tom Cruise's worst movie of his career. I can't understand the hate for what is essentially a fun B-movie, so my review is going to be a little different. I've read through a bevy of bad reviews and lifted the major criticisms leveled at the film. I'll be addressing them one-by-one and why I disagree or think the broadsides are overblown. Here's a quick plot synopsis for some general context. Thousands of years ago, Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella) was next in line for the Egyptian throne, and then her pharaoh father had a son. Rather than be sidelined, Ahmanet made a deal with the god Set to kill her family with a magic knife and become an all-powerful being. She was thwarted in the middle of the human-sacrifice ritual and she's sentenced to being buried alive. She was buried thousands of miles away and the magic jewel, needed to complete the magic knife, was buried in England in a Crusader's crypt. In present-day Iraq, Nick Morton (Tom Cruise), his sidekick (Jake Johnson), and his love interest (Annabelle Wallis) stumble upon the tomb of Ahmanet. They're transporting her sarcophagus back to England when a cloud of crows attacks their Army plane. The plane crashes, with Nick on it, but he awakens unscathed on a morgue slab. Apparently Nick is marked by Ahmanet as her chosen vessel. 1) "Cinematic universe fatigue." This is the number one indictment in all the critiques but it feels more like critics just used The Mummy as a jumping off point to add to a thesis statement on the dearth of originality in a franchise-obsessed Hollywood. I get it. In the wake of the Marvel Cinematic Universe's unparalleled run of success, it's not just about franchises now but also about a series of inter-connected franchises forming a universe of stories. There are also DC's failed efforts to try their own universe, a possible Hasbro Universe (Transformers, G.I. Joe), the ongoing and morphing X-Men universe, and now the emergence of the Dark Universe, a studio's attempt to repackage the classic monster properties of old. When done poorly, the cinematic universes reek of nakedly obvious crass commercialism. However, just being opposed to these cinematic universes on principle alone feels misguided. It's presumptuous. It all depends on whether or not the stories can exist on their own. Batman vs. Superman and Suicide Squad didn't crash and burn merely because they were overextended by tie-ins to other movies. They failed because they were bad stories and were terribly executed, and yes being overextended was a component but not the only one by far. Movies still need to be good. The Mummy only gives a sense of a larger universe through the appearances of Dr. Henry Jekyll (Russell Crowe) the leader of Prodigium, a S.H.I.E.L.D.-esque agency tasked with monitoring the world of "gods and monsters." That's about it, a preview of a larger world of monsters with some visual Easter eggs scattered here and there. The character of Jekyll is a learned scientist that can unload a larger picture, and his institution also provides a setup for false security. He is organically placed into the narrative and Prodigium actually supplies a credible reason why they don't just smash the key crystal that Ahmanet needs for her resurrection purposes. Crowe (The Nice Guys) is one of the best parts of the movie, and when he gets to slip into Hyde mode the movie allows him to have a malicious sense of fun. I don't think the visual element of Hyde quite works but it doesn't sabotage the scenes. Not all of Crowe's exposition is necessary, especially the opening sequence finding the buried Crusaders, but he provides a stable presence, until he also presents Prodigium as a pragmatic threat. This is why I think that the most critics are condemning the idea of the Dark Universe and what it stands for in broader terms and not on the actual merits of how it set up its larger universe. 2) "Cruise is miscast as the lead." I'm a fan of Cruise as an actor and especially as the lead in action movies. The man is a natural movie star and he gives his all with every performance. As a paying moviegoer, I respect that work ethic. Having Cruise play a rakish surveyor of antiquities seems like a good fit for his abilities. He's played charming, dangerous rogues before. Here's the thing that critics don't seem to be processing: Cruise's character is meant to be a jerk. He's self-centered and prone to making impulsive decisions, like shooting a rope keeping a sarcophagus suspended in liquid mercury. Plus if you don't like Cruise as a person or an actor he's routinely beaten up n the movie to fine comic results. His character arc is about him becoming the kind of person who's willing to think about others and a greater good. It's simple but it works. I do think The Mummy goes too far in trying to explain the signposts of his character arc. Occasionally they undercut the moment to great effect. There's a scene where Wallis (Annabelle) tries to encourage Norton that she knows there's a good man inside him. After all, he gave her the only parachute as the plane went down. He then sheepishly says, "I thought... there was another one." I laughed out loud so hard. The movie does work a little too hard to announce Nick's swaggering Lothario ways ("Me thinks the lady doth protest too much"), and there's a 25-year age gap between Wallis and Cruise, but these aren't faults invented by only this movie. Cruise was an enjoyable lead for me and his ease with comedy, action, and drama prevailed. 3) "Tone issues abound." Critics are lambasting the film for being too many things with too many tones, but much like cinematic universes, it all comes down to execution. The Mummy has elements of action, horror, especially its zombie-mummies, dark comedy, like Johnson showing back up as zombie comic relief a la An American Werewolf in London, and even some inspired slapstick. When Nick is fighting a batch of zombie-mummies, he thrusts his fist through one skull and hangs another sideways against a wall, and both keep on fighting. The different elements added to my entertainment rather than detracting from it. I enjoyed that the movie could be suspenseful or silly depending upon the scene. The action sequences are serviceable to good, the highlight being the zero gravity plummet within the body of the plane. Alex Kurtzman (a writer responsible for Star Trek, Transformers, and other big studio pictures) makes an adequate director without any distinguishing sense of style. I feel like the more memorable aspects of the action are from Kurtzman thinking as a writer. Take for instance a scene where Nick is swimming underwater and we watch subterranean tombs open. The zombie-mummy Crusaders then starts swimming after Nick, providing a terrific visual. The action sequences vary and develop and make good use of their geography. I also appreciated that the third act does not fall into the superhero standard of CGI monster slugfest that loses perspective and scale (even Wonder Woman suffers from this). Also, apparently in the time since Stephen Sommers' campy 1999 Mummy film, everyone championing that movie seems to have forgotten that it was a mess of tones as well. The Brendan Frasier mummy movies were a fun, spirited, winking big0budget B-movie with style and personality. I don't think Cruise's Mummy film reaches those same heights but there are enough similarities. 4) "Underwritten female characters." This is a legitimate criticism when discussing Wallis' character. She offers very little to the overall story except to verbally explain exposition or character beats. The fact that she needs rescuing is a given. It's an underwritten role and clearly just an excuse for a good-looking actress to be at Cruise's side during moments of peril and derring-do. However, this accusation overlooks Boutella's character, Princess Ahmanet. Her very back-story involves a woman striking back against a patriarchy that wouldn't value her unless it had no alternative. She's a killer but she has her reasons, but more importantly she's an interesting antagonist even if her overall goal is basic world conquering. Boutella (Star Trek Beyond) has a magnetic presence on screen and seems to enjoy stretching herself with different physicality from an alien to a mummy to a blade-legged henchwoman. She enjoys playing kickass women who lead by example, and Ahmanet is no exception. I was pleased that Ahmanet was not going to be reserved as a strictly Act Three villain. She's prominent throughout the narrative and burrowed inside her marked man's head, leading to dessert flashbacks and a general repetition of Boutella's partial nude scene. The filmmakers are getting the most out of one shadow-draped PG-13 nude scene. Suffice to say, in my view The Mummy does not deserve its savaging by the critical community. I think too many critics are assailing larger points (Tom Cruise as a person, cinematic universes) and losing sight of the actual movie itself. The Mummy is not a perfect film by any stretch but it's a movie that has a strong sense of its identity and how to meet its goals. The Mummy is a modest B-movie with a sense of fun that offers enough surprises, suspense and action sequences, and clever visuals to entertain. If this is the start to the Dark Universe then I feel optimistic about where else the newest creature features will lead. I recommend giving this one a chance once the dust settles. You may be just as surprised. Nate's Grade: B

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

The Mummy Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Discussion Forum

Discuss The Mummy on our Movie forum!

News & Features