The Wild Child (L'enfant sauvage) 1970

The Wild Child

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100%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 27

81%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 3,905

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Movie Info

A young boy (Jean-Pierre Cargol) is discovered in a forest, living a feral existence among a pack of wolves. Captured by hunters, he is sent to Paris and placed in a school for deaf-mute children. There he is observed by Dr. Itard (François Truffaut) who concludes that the boy is neither deaf nor intellectually stunted, but has simply been deprived of normal, humanizing influences. With no shortage of tenderness, patience and ambition, Itard devotes himself to educating and civilizing the boy.

Cast & Crew

François Truffaut
Le Dr Jean Itard
Jean Dasté
Professor Philippe Pinel
Annie Miller
Madame Lemeri
Claude Miller
Monsieur Lemeri
Paul Ville
Remy
Nathan Miller
Baby Lemeri
François Truffaut
Director
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Critic Reviews for The Wild Child (L'enfant sauvage)

All Critics (27) | Top Critics (12) | Fresh (27)

  • Quote not available.

    November 17, 2011 | Rating: 5/5

    David Fear

    Time Out
    Top Critic
  • The Wild Child is fascinating not only for its Tarzan-like true-life story, but also for what it says about the process of nurturing and educating children, and the tools we use -- language, discipline, affection -- to do so.

    February 19, 2009 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…
  • Nearly four decades after its release, The Wild Child remains startling for its humane clarity, for Nestor Almendros's brilliant black-and-white photography, and for the sense that Truffaut is achieving filmmaking mastery on a very small scale.

    February 5, 2009 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…

    Ty Burr

    Boston Globe
    Top Critic
  • An enduring film of enchanting and provocative revelation.

    January 9, 2009 | Rating: 4.5/5 | Full Review…
  • Nearly 40 years after its initial release, Francois Truffaut's The Wild Child (L'Enfant Sauvage) still manages to cast its haunting, poetic spell.

    December 18, 2008 | Full Review…
  • Rather than present a clichd fall from grace, Truffaut elicits ambivalence by closely tracking the Enlightened scientist's optimism; after the fascination, our inchoate sadness seeps in.

    November 5, 2008 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Wild Child (L'enfant sauvage)

  • Sep 05, 2011
    "The Wild Child" is an engaging film, but it's hard to guess why director Francois Truffaut felt compelled to tell this simple story. The premise (a patient 18th-century teacher, played by Truffaut himself, eases a feral pre-teen into civilization) is quite straightforward, and the boy doesn't advance enough to fully please an audience (you may be surprised when the film abruptly ends). And there aren't any notable directing choices beyond a few nostalgic iris shots. Perhaps this tale should be loosely filed with "Small Change" and "The 400 Blows" as just another look at children finding their way in the world. Jean-Pierre Cargol is impressive in the title role. He only says one word, but is put through quite a physical test.
    Eric B Super Reviewer
  • Feb 26, 2011
    Based on the subject and the director's nationality, I assumed that this film would be some kind of restatement or exploration of Rousseau's "noble savage" theory, and though there is some of this discussion in one or two lines, the film doesn't spend much time juxtaposing modernity and the "wild" child's original habitat. Based on all the critics' reviews, this film is an exploration or discussion of child development, but there is very little original presented here. So, I'm left struggling to figure out what this film is about and why people like it so much. I found the story to be merely a French, poor man's <i>Miracle Worker</i>, and I found the acting, especially by Truffaut, to be stilted and staid. Even Truffaut's direction lacks vigor. Almost every scene is a motionless three-quarter shot, backed by a heavy-handed harpsichord. Overall, I neither found this intellectually nor emotionally compelling. Like Truffaut's acting, it was just there, saying nothing interesting or interestingly.
    Jim H Super Reviewer
  • May 09, 2010
    For those unfamiliar with what a "feral child" is, it is a child who from the early years of their life has been denied contact with other humans. Tarzan of the apes and Mowgli from The Jungle Book are probably the most well known feral children of fiction, but there are cases of real life feral children. It's a topic that really intrigues me, and led to my discovery of the French film The Wild Child. A docudrama of sorts, it is based on actual journal entries about "The Wild Boy of Aveyron." The film opens somewhat abruptly, immediately showing the discovery and capture of the "The Wild Boy," who is eventually named Victor. Victor is found naked in a forest in southern France. He is presumed to be about 12, and seems unable to speak or understand human language. He is taken to a school for deaf mutes, deemed "an idiot child," and treated as something of a tourist attraction. One of those at the school, Dr. Jean Marc Gaspard Itard (played by François Truffaut, who also produced and directed the film) sees things differently than his colleagues, eventually gaining custody of Victor and dedicating his time to civilizing the child. This process takes up the majority of the film. The viewer is taken through the months of Victor's lessons, starting with basic concepts of humanity like walking normally and wearing clothes, and eventually transitioning into understanding language. The teaching of Victor is without a doubt the most interesting part of the movie. This isn't just because it also happens to be the most interesting part of the true story, but also because the first fourth of the movie is where most of its problems are. The biggest issue the film has is the lack of interest the majority of the characters show in this very intriguing discovery. Dr. Jean Itard and his assistant Madame Guerin seem to be the only characters who realize the significance of Victor. All the other characters just treat it like a normal occurrence, with their only real emotion towards Victor being one of disdain, seeing him as being beneath them. I suppose this was probably intentional, meant to show how Dr. Itard differs from the rest of his colleagues, but I think it's taken a bit too far, making the first fourth of the film lack a certain level of emotion. Another issue the film has is its limitations from the true story. For example, we don't see what Victor's life was like before he was captured. Why was he abandoned? How did he learn to fend for himself? Was he always completely alone? None of these questions are answered in the movie, because they were never answered in real life. We get some hints, but that's about it. I also felt a bit unsatisfied with the ending. It's not that it's a bad ending, it just felt lacking. However, I must say that I'm happy with their decision to stay close to the facts, with very little dramatization. It may leave me dissatisfied at certain points, but there are enough fictional feral children in the media; it was nice to see the story of a real one. Ultimately this is a good film despite its faults. A quiet piece that moves at a deliberate pace, I'm not entirely sure I can label it as "entertaining," but I can say it is very engaging. François Truffaut's performance as Dr. Jean Itard is good, and the boy who plays Victor is superb, especially considering that he only speaks about three times. The Wild Child is a very intriguing film that has left me thinking about it long after the credits rolled. Well deserving of the title "a classic," this 40 year-old film holds up surprisingly well, and is definitely worth a look.
    Michael M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 14, 2009
    Truffaut's docu-drama about the discovery of a small boy living completely on his own in the forests of France in the late 18th century. Much more academic than most of his other films, it's nonetheless fascinating to watch. A study in child development and psychology.
    Randy T Super Reviewer

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