Thirteen Women 1932

Thirteen Women

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

56%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 9

34%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 248

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Thirteen Women Photos

Movie Info

Female alumnae of the St. Albans Seminary sorority group receive letters from Swami Yogodachi, making alarming predictions of death and murder -- which come true. When Helen Frye (Kay Johnson) receives her prediction, she contacts sorority leader Laura Stanhope (Irene Dunne), who invites the remaining members to come to her home. On the journey there, Helen meets Ursula Georgi (Myrna Loy), a half-Indian, unaware that Ursula's fury over her treatment in college is behind the swami's predictions.

Cast

Irene Dunne
as Laura Stanhope
Myrna Loy
as Ursula Georgi
Ricardo Cortez
as Police Sergeant Barry Clive
Florence Eldridge
as Grace Coombs
Jill Esmond
as Jo Turner
Kay Johnson
as Helen Dawson
Harriet Hagman
as May Raskob
Mary Duncan
as June Raskob
Wally Albright
as Bobby Stanhope
C. Henry Gordon
as Swami Yogadachi
Blanche Frederici
as Miss Kirsten
Phyllis Fraser
as 12th Woman
Betty Furness
as 13th Woman
Audrey Scott
as Equestrienne
Aloha Porter
as Equestrienne
Clayton Behee
as Trapeze Act
Eddie Viera
as Trapeze Act
Eddie DeComa
as Trapeze Act
Buster Bartell
as Trapeze Act
Teddy Mangean
as Wire Walker
Cliff Herbert
as Circus Act
Lee Phelps
as Conductor
Edward J. Le Saint
as Police Chief
Lloyd Ingraham
as Inspector
Mitchell Harris
as Detective
Ken Thomson
as Undetermined Role
Louis Natheaux
as Police Chemist
Allen Pomeroy
as Bit Part
View All

Critic Reviews for Thirteen Women

All Critics (9) | Top Critics (3) | Fresh (5) | Rotten (4)

Audience Reviews for Thirteen Women

  • Apr 01, 2017
    Campy and entertaining, there are flashes of brilliance here: tight shots on Loy, made up as an evil Indian mystic bent on getting revenge against her old classmates, some scenes where tension is built up rather nicely (I won't spoil them), and even a car chase scene, 1932-style. You'll have to suspend disbelief over the concept that the mind can be controlled by another via 'waves', but that's part of the fun. Loy's motivation is revealed towards the end as she confronts Irene Dunne, and it reveals the racial climate of the times: as a "half-caste Indian half-breed", she was not allowed to "pass" as white in a sorority. As she explains it, for half-breed men this meant being a coolie, and for a woman, she simply shrugs, implying prostitution. As with many films treating race relations at the time, it has a mixed message, on the one hand, pointing out the unfairness of the sorority (and how racist its rules were), and on the other, elevating fears of violence by non-Caucasians. It's interesting that the film has quite a bit of the framework of the modern thriller in it, but it's not fleshed out as much as it ideally would have been, and seems abrupt in places. Finding out that the original release was 14 minutes longer could explain that, but I have to review it for what survives. You could do worse, and it's actually kind of a fun movie. Oh, and last point - interesting to see Peg Entwistle in her only credited screen role, before jumping from the 'H' in the Hollywood(land) sign in despair. Watch for her character 'Hazel' early on.
    Antonius B Super Reviewer
  • Jun 15, 2014
    Silly junk, wildly dated that was one of Myrna's final villainess Eurasian roles. She looks great but is far better than the part deserves.
    jay n Super Reviewer
  • Feb 18, 2012
    Thirteen former sorority sisters start to receive, one by one, a horoscope prophesizing their doom from a renowned swami. When the prophecies begin to play out, the remaining few gather to fight their destiny. It turns out Myrna Loy attended their college but wasn't accepted into the sorority because she was a half-caste Hindu. It's Loy who is behind the letters, having influenced the swami with her mind powers, and she's out for bloody revenge on the girls who shunned her. Sounds like the plot of an eighties slasher like "House On Sorority Row" right? Wrong, this was made in 1932, taking advantage of that small window before the Hays Code shut the party down. I can't say if the makers of the "Final Destination" series were influenced by this but the theme of trying to escape your fate is very similar. The opening scene involving a trapeze act feels like a thirties precursor to the set pieces of that franchise. There's an effective scene on a subway platform, Archainbaud ratcheting up the tension by exaggerating the sound of the station turnstiles. Hollywood wasn't known for raising the issue of racism in the early thirties so the motives of Loy are quite a curiosity. Tellingly though she isn't portrayed with any of the sympathy such a character would evoke in a contemporary movie. Likewise the mention of a miscarriage feels pretty heavy compared to the general frothiness of thirties cinema. One of the women implies a promiscuous nature which will be a bit of a shock if you're not familiar with pre-code cinema. Irene Dunne plays a single mother, trying to stop Loy from claiming the life of her son. How often do we see a single mother as the heroine of a movie now let alone back then? Male audiences may have found this early feminism uncomfortable. In his review at the time, New York Times critic Mordaunt Hall noted "an uncomfortable absence of hearty male chatter in this demoniacal intrigue". Several characters meet their fate through suicide, a topic that immediately became taboo once the code was introduced. In possibly the first creepy offscreen coincidence surrounding the production of a horror movie, star Peg Entwistle ended her life on the day of the film's release. Dramatically, she threw herself from atop the letter H on the famous Hollywood sign. It may be creaky even for it's era but it's a nice little curiosity piece and an interesting foreshadowing of the slashers that would appear almost half a century later.
    The Movie W Super Reviewer
  • Sep 03, 2010
    If you're someone who enjoys movies where women sit around and gossip and get divorces from their husbands, you'll like this movie, but if you're like me and want more from a movie look elsewhere. Overall, this movie is okay, but it's long and it gets annoying listening to the women gossip for scene after scene.
    Aj V Super Reviewer

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