What's Cooking? Reviews

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December 29, 2010
A bit melodramatic at times, but still charming.
December 30, 2006
December 20, 2006
This valentine to the cultural diversity that defines L.A. is a second-tier Altman (or even Paul Thomas Anderson)a broad, accessible comedy that contrasts four large and dynamic families residing on the same street: Latino, black, Jewish, and Asian.
August 20, 2001
A combination of fresh ingredients mixed together with skill to create a well-balanced harmony of diverse flavours. Delicious.
January 1, 2000
For a canvas this broad, the portraiture is exceptionally fine.
January 1, 2000
The film collapses under the weight of stereotypes and a hackneyed concept.
January 1, 2000
Chadha handles the multiple story lines and large cast with an expert hand, cutting back and forth to underscore the similarities and the differences.
January 1, 2000
It's nothing if not well-intentioned, but
January 1, 2000
The louder and more melodramatic the arguments get, the more overwrought the acting becomes.
January 1, 2000
Chadha tries to keep so many balls in the air at once, she can't generate any steam in the individual stories.
January 1, 2000
Like the meal itself, the movie's both filling and familiar.
January 1, 2000
It's a meal you may feel you've eaten before, but you nonetheless walk away stuffed and happy.
January 1, 2000
Trades in sitcom stereotypes and crosscuts predictably from family to family as if under the misapprehension that equal time is a dramatic principle.
January 1, 2000
This film is lighthearted and smart enough to be one of the best Altmanesque ensemble comedies of the last couple of years.
January 1, 2000
The brouhahas are more undercooked than the birds.
January 1, 2000
A glorified TV movie.
January 1, 2000
The film's gluttonous overkill of food is matched only by its overacting.
January 1, 2000
Contrived, cliched and condescending.
January 1, 2000
Because the stories are so skillfully threaded together, the movie doesn't feel like an exercise: Each of the stories stands on its own.
January 1, 2000
It wears both its heart and its politics too obviously on its sleeve for comfort.
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