White Men Can't Jump Reviews

  • 4d ago

    A sports come that is somewhat clever.

    A sports come that is somewhat clever.

  • Jul 28, 2019

    The best sports movie ever made!

    The best sports movie ever made!

  • Apr 19, 2019

    Ok movie starring Wesley snipes and woody heralson. This movie was good at times especially all the basketball scenes and I'll just forget about this movie in t minus 45 minutes.

    Ok movie starring Wesley snipes and woody heralson. This movie was good at times especially all the basketball scenes and I'll just forget about this movie in t minus 45 minutes.

  • Mar 14, 2019

    Very good movie and funny love watching it when it makes the rounds on tv

    Very good movie and funny love watching it when it makes the rounds on tv

  • Nov 28, 2018

    Despite a great cast who give great performances, this movie never rises above a mediocre comedy.

    Despite a great cast who give great performances, this movie never rises above a mediocre comedy.

  • Aug 17, 2018

    A good movie about sports functions effectively like an actual sports game: For whatever reason, we emotionally invest ourselves in the success of the people playing the game, so that when they win, the audience vicariously gets to share in their enjoyment. The viewer feels the tension of an impossible shot along with the player, takes part in the visceral glee of success, acting as the sixth man on the sidelines, no less a part of the team than those actually playing. No doubt that structure repeats itself beautifully in WMCJ, but what makes the movie stand apart from other sports movies is how frequently and how terribly these characters lose-not at the game itself, but at the larger game of life. It's a lesson made explicit in the film, and one that is rare to see played out: "There are times that when you win, you lose, and when you lose, you win." More often than not, movies about sports will make lip service to the humbling idea that "this is just a game," but nonetheless imbue all the subjective transference into a final moment where the player beats the odds and wins big, taking home the trophy and the girl and the prize bag and the glory. Insofar as the drama off the court affects or complements or allegorizes the drama on the court, the big final game is presented as the total climax for the emotional journey. What other lessons are learned, about being a team player or not quitting or whatever, come to fruition in the final moments of play, lifting our hero to athletic heights not yet reached. That fantasy is best exemplified here not by the two male leads, but by the terrific Rosie Perez, whose journey to win at Jeopardy subverts the standard machismo physicality of the genre but nonetheless much better fits the ordinary mold of these films. Here, however, there are no simply happy endings, no buzzer-beating moments or walk-off home runs; writer/director Shelton is far more interested in what happens after the game than the journey beforehand. Snipes and Harrelson, who have an electric chemistry throughout, are both stellar ballers from the start and need to learn no lessons in order to win the championship or beat any challengers in the end. Rather, the central drama has everything to do with their mutual inability to reconcile with their own talent, their failure to see it as "just a game" and leave it all on the court. Winning is not good enough for either player, who are both competitive to the point of self-destruction, but especially for Harrelson, whose compulsive gambling addiction causes him to lose more than any other character in a sports movie I can remember. In the end, what makes WMCJ so much more compelling than its generic peers is the failures of its characters, not their successes, the way they lose when they win and win when they lose.

    A good movie about sports functions effectively like an actual sports game: For whatever reason, we emotionally invest ourselves in the success of the people playing the game, so that when they win, the audience vicariously gets to share in their enjoyment. The viewer feels the tension of an impossible shot along with the player, takes part in the visceral glee of success, acting as the sixth man on the sidelines, no less a part of the team than those actually playing. No doubt that structure repeats itself beautifully in WMCJ, but what makes the movie stand apart from other sports movies is how frequently and how terribly these characters lose-not at the game itself, but at the larger game of life. It's a lesson made explicit in the film, and one that is rare to see played out: "There are times that when you win, you lose, and when you lose, you win." More often than not, movies about sports will make lip service to the humbling idea that "this is just a game," but nonetheless imbue all the subjective transference into a final moment where the player beats the odds and wins big, taking home the trophy and the girl and the prize bag and the glory. Insofar as the drama off the court affects or complements or allegorizes the drama on the court, the big final game is presented as the total climax for the emotional journey. What other lessons are learned, about being a team player or not quitting or whatever, come to fruition in the final moments of play, lifting our hero to athletic heights not yet reached. That fantasy is best exemplified here not by the two male leads, but by the terrific Rosie Perez, whose journey to win at Jeopardy subverts the standard machismo physicality of the genre but nonetheless much better fits the ordinary mold of these films. Here, however, there are no simply happy endings, no buzzer-beating moments or walk-off home runs; writer/director Shelton is far more interested in what happens after the game than the journey beforehand. Snipes and Harrelson, who have an electric chemistry throughout, are both stellar ballers from the start and need to learn no lessons in order to win the championship or beat any challengers in the end. Rather, the central drama has everything to do with their mutual inability to reconcile with their own talent, their failure to see it as "just a game" and leave it all on the court. Winning is not good enough for either player, who are both competitive to the point of self-destruction, but especially for Harrelson, whose compulsive gambling addiction causes him to lose more than any other character in a sports movie I can remember. In the end, what makes WMCJ so much more compelling than its generic peers is the failures of its characters, not their successes, the way they lose when they win and win when they lose.

  • Apr 08, 2018

    Not what I was hoping now I have seen better basketball movies now there where some fun moments

    Not what I was hoping now I have seen better basketball movies now there where some fun moments

  • Oct 12, 2017

    Fuelled by a great script and energetic performances, this basketball movie is a great twist on the buddy cop flick. Packed with fun, the basketball scenes will have you cheering out loud. Although falling off in the final act by following many of the genres cliché's, it's still a fun time throughout.

    Fuelled by a great script and energetic performances, this basketball movie is a great twist on the buddy cop flick. Packed with fun, the basketball scenes will have you cheering out loud. Although falling off in the final act by following many of the genres cliché's, it's still a fun time throughout.

  • Sep 05, 2017

    It has its fair share of 90's Hollywood cheese and plot conveniences, but the swift pacing and charm of its three lead characters makes White Men Can't Jump timeless fun and something of a classic.

    It has its fair share of 90's Hollywood cheese and plot conveniences, but the swift pacing and charm of its three lead characters makes White Men Can't Jump timeless fun and something of a classic.

  • Jul 21, 2017

    White Men Can't Jump has all the hallmarks of your typical, seen-it-all-before sports film - the kind where desperado underdogs tackle a tough tournament, fall out, make up, almost lose, then win. The difference is that the obligatory tournament in White Men Can't Jump takes up less than ten minutes of the film's running time, as writer-director Ron Shelton is much more concerned with the physical and mental make-up of said desperadoes than he is in dressing up an old paint-by-numbers plot in early-90s basketball apparel. His two main protagonists, a greasy gambling addict who can't say no to a good hustle (Woody Harrelson) and a fast-talking man-child with a wife and kids to feed (Wesley Snipes) are two sides of the same one pence coin - and the film is predominantly concerned with exploring the similarities between these two up-and-down down-and-outs despite their differences in terms of race. This is still a sports comedy, and there's plenty of sports and plenty of comedy. But the film also has a lot to say about addiction, desperation, racism and the general dynamics of down-and-out-ism.

    White Men Can't Jump has all the hallmarks of your typical, seen-it-all-before sports film - the kind where desperado underdogs tackle a tough tournament, fall out, make up, almost lose, then win. The difference is that the obligatory tournament in White Men Can't Jump takes up less than ten minutes of the film's running time, as writer-director Ron Shelton is much more concerned with the physical and mental make-up of said desperadoes than he is in dressing up an old paint-by-numbers plot in early-90s basketball apparel. His two main protagonists, a greasy gambling addict who can't say no to a good hustle (Woody Harrelson) and a fast-talking man-child with a wife and kids to feed (Wesley Snipes) are two sides of the same one pence coin - and the film is predominantly concerned with exploring the similarities between these two up-and-down down-and-outs despite their differences in terms of race. This is still a sports comedy, and there's plenty of sports and plenty of comedy. But the film also has a lot to say about addiction, desperation, racism and the general dynamics of down-and-out-ism.