1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything: Season 1 (2021)


Season 1
1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything

Critics Consensus

It covers familiar ground, but with a feast of rare footage and a clear affection for its subject 1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything is as edifying as it is entertaining.

100%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 22

67%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 9

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Episodes

Air date: May 21, 2021

Artists such as John Lennon and Marvin Gaye strive to incorporate social activism into music as the civil unrest from the previous era lingers.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

As the use of hard drugs continues to take its toll, musicians like Jim Morrison draw further away from the public eye.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

Musicians begin to experiment with style, form, and performance.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

Joni Mitchell and Carole King work to overcome sexism in the industry as Lou Reed and Elton John test the waters for queer representation in music.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

As racial tension boils over in America, artists take to their music to document the upheaval.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

Artists such as Jim Morrison and The Rolling Stones continue to produce top-selling albums despite their heavy recreational drug use.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

The musicians represented by Stax Records strive to overcome racism in the music industry.

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Air date: May 21, 2021

A variety of musicians, including Alice Cooper and Iggy Pop, blend genres and technologies to enhance their creativity.

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Tv Season Info

In a tumultuous era, 1971 was a year of musical innovation and rebirth fueled by the political and cultural upheaval of the time.

Cast & Crew

Asif Kapadia
Executive Producer
James Gay-Rees
Executive Producer
David Joseph
Executive Producer
Adam Barker
Executive Producer

News & Interviews for 1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything: Season 1

Critic Reviews for 1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything Season 1

All Critics (22) | Top Critics (9)

Weaves an aural and visual tapestry of a time no less chaotic, convulsive, and uncertain than our own.

May 20, 2021 | Full Review…

This eight-part series gets off to a fascinating start... Well worth checking out.

Jun 1, 2021 | Full Review…

1971 wants to be both Ken Burns and VH1's Behind the Music. It could have been a great version of either one, but it's too thin to be both. Still, it hits the spot when it gets there.

May 25, 2021 | Full Review…

It's an eye-opening, mind-bending journey for anyone of any age to digest.

May 25, 2021 | Full Review…

We often see the lyrics of songs superimposed onto still photos and archival footage of the time...it's a powerful technique, merging the music with the movements.

May 21, 2021 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…

1971 feels immersive, and allows viewers to understand how art could be created out of tumult and conflict.

Jun 2, 2021 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

... a brilliant stringing together of music and images and stories from a year when the idyllic innocence of the 1960s met the harsh realities of war and violence and injustice.

Jun 1, 2021 | Full Review…

Part history lesson, part celebration of some truly iconic sounds.

May 26, 2021 | Full Review…

1971 feels immediate, exciting, confused, current - and it also feels like the stresses that impact culture today are the same ones that fuelled the tug-of-war between the establishment and counter-cultures of America and Britain 50 years earlier.

May 25, 2021 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

Finely-balanced critical context ... kept me watching with pleasure and keenly renewed interest.

May 25, 2021 | Rating: 4.0/5.0 | Full Review…

For me, the mark of a great film is one that leaves you craving more. And "1971" is such an entity, a relevant history lesson presented with a burst of nostalgia and enlightenment.

May 23, 2021 | Rating: A- | Full Review…

Here's one of the most all-encompassing and stunning music documentary experiences that I've ever seen. Allow the information to take hold and process, and you'll feel your own creativity and interests blossom.

May 22, 2021 | Rating: A | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for 1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything: Season 1

  • 3d ago
    Ok, I love the music being young during this time - the footage is great and for anyone who did live thru this time, it brings back lots of memories - for the younger crowd, well, they might enjoy it and learning what us 'boomers' lived thru when we were young. Really enjoyed this series.
  • 6d ago
    There needs to be an IQ test before people can submit reviews. I have never seen so many moronic reviews submitted by imbeciles.
  • May 27, 2021
    While this series is entitled 1971; The Year That Music Changed Everything it strayed frequently from this main theme. I watched and was drawn into the historical video clips and interviews. It was an interesting jog to the memory and worth the time for this reason alone. However like many current productions, both fiction and non-fiction, 1971 takes a very progressive focus through the lenses of gender, social justice/reform and race. I found it disappointing that in several episodes the focus was on one or anther of these themes and the music and musicians became an afterthought, a brief footnote. In this regard, the series fails to establish that 'music changed everything' in 1971. Certainly it was in many ways a pivotal year. But, as presented, much of the music of the time was in response to social and political events, not so much driving them. And probably needless to say, but in spite of the issues of the time and the burgeoning power of the hippie boomers coming of age there were many, if not more, purely 'commercial' pop/rock music artists that are completely overlooked. For those of us who lived in that time, the themes of social reform, gender and race were not necessarily predominant but part of the overall mix. A good series, but the title is inaccurate. The director took on a huge scope for this project, way beyond what the title implies and that is probably its strength but also the root of any weaknesses I noted.
  • May 24, 2021
    What a sham. I was excited to see the Exile episode. Hoping for a tamer CS Blues. It was nothing like that. Instead Sharon Tate, Jay Sebring, Gibby Folger and Voytek's crime scene phtots were splashed on the screen. So DISTASTEFUL! I don't even think there was any mention about them as people, only then as props in Manson's ridiculous tale of jealousy and hatred. Once again, another documentary glamorizing Charles Manson, like he was someone interesting, when he wasn't. He was just a loser. I would be great if the media stopped feeding this Manson mystique. The dude was a jealous, smelly, racist, entitled loser. And he ruined my Stones doc.
  • May 22, 2021
    So, did all of your 1971 anti-war peace & love bullshit idealistic music of irresponsible thoughts of rebel everything you take for granted ideology helped you now? Instead it became chaotic. I tell you what your stupid problem is, you're like those people who rebel winter when its winter time (which you want summer), rebel summer when its summer (which you want winter). John Lennon how about we imagine 'father' in this song as the gov, 'son' as you and your stupid reckless idea? Cat Stevens has said in his song "Father and Son",[1] Some people think that I was taking the son's side. But how could I have sung the father's side if I couldn't have understood it, too? I was listening to that song recently and I heard one line and realized that that was my father's father's father's father's father's father's father's father speaking. I wrote "Father And Son" in connection with an idea I had about a musical based on the Russian Revolution: the son was about to join the Revolution, the father was a farmer who wanted him to stay at home. [1] https://genius.com/Cat-stevens-father-and-son-lyrics

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