Adventure Time: Season 10 Reviews

  • Jun 02, 2021

    best show of the decade fr

    best show of the decade fr

  • Apr 14, 2021

    The final season of Adventure time was a great ending to this awesome show. The show wrapped up well with all questions answered to the end of the season. The relationship between Marceline and princess bubblegum was to me not expected but it was great to see LGBT representation in the show.

    The final season of Adventure time was a great ending to this awesome show. The show wrapped up well with all questions answered to the end of the season. The relationship between Marceline and princess bubblegum was to me not expected but it was great to see LGBT representation in the show.

  • Mar 28, 2021

    I do think the ending was slightly underwhelming with a lot of fan service and too many call backs to past parts of the show. But overall it is pretty fantastic and closes out the series in a way that not only works but also brings out the shows core message and themes.

    I do think the ending was slightly underwhelming with a lot of fan service and too many call backs to past parts of the show. But overall it is pretty fantastic and closes out the series in a way that not only works but also brings out the shows core message and themes.

  • Mar 17, 2021

    Quite possibly, the laziest most dissatisfying ending to any show. Overall, I thought the entirety of the show was good. Some episodes and seasons were weak. Some of the later episodes just weren't very good. I held off watching the final episode, because I was worried it would ruin the show. I finally did, and it did. It was so bad. I could write a book on how bad it was. Other fans told me not to watch it, because it would ruin it. Should have listened. Anyone giving this episode five stars is just a fanboy who refuses to acknowledge when something they love is bad. If you don't want to ruin the show, don't watch this last episode. (You could probably just not watch this season)

    Quite possibly, the laziest most dissatisfying ending to any show. Overall, I thought the entirety of the show was good. Some episodes and seasons were weak. Some of the later episodes just weren't very good. I held off watching the final episode, because I was worried it would ruin the show. I finally did, and it did. It was so bad. I could write a book on how bad it was. Other fans told me not to watch it, because it would ruin it. Should have listened. Anyone giving this episode five stars is just a fanboy who refuses to acknowledge when something they love is bad. If you don't want to ruin the show, don't watch this last episode. (You could probably just not watch this season)

  • Jan 31, 2021

    Bye bye this was a great show

    Bye bye this was a great show

  • Oct 16, 2020

    Show started off amazing and fell apart after season 5. I'm sorry but this ending was so overrated.

    Show started off amazing and fell apart after season 5. I'm sorry but this ending was so overrated.

  • Jun 24, 2020

    I can't even express how much I hated this MISERABLE ending. It had so much potential but they've managed to ruin it all. I'm simply dissapointed beyond measure. I'd suggest not watching this mere show at all.

    I can't even express how much I hated this MISERABLE ending. It had so much potential but they've managed to ruin it all. I'm simply dissapointed beyond measure. I'd suggest not watching this mere show at all.

  • May 25, 2020

    Right off the bat, I feel like the very first thing I just have to say about Adventure Time is its indisputably godly world-building. Even with that specific aspect in mind, I can hardly find where to begin. Hardly any Western cartoon I know comes close to the sheer vastness of Adventure Time's massive universe, or at least does nearly as well in drawing interest to it. One of my most favorite parts of the show is its complex, multi-layered dystopian backstory and how it's filled with all sorts of mysteries and adventures ready to be explored. The mystery around the series' post-apocalyptic setting is absolutely breathtaking. It becomes clear from the start that this world is much, much bigger than the main characters. And what I especially cannot get over is how exactly Adventure Time reveals this world to the audience. You don't actually realize the dystopian in the beginning, but after a few episodes you start to realize the ruins of modern-day roads and skyscrapers littered here and there, the giant crater in Earth, and occasional flashbacks referring to post-apocalyptic events. Once I did realize it, every detail that seemed to tie in with it never ceased to keep me at the edge of my seat. The lore is slowly uncovered and explained little by little through many different backstories, origins, and various other elements episode by episode, sometimes taking a peek millennia into the future and other times delving into the thick mysteries of the past. It stretches over countless points in time and space. Each episode adds to the massive, unending jigsaw puzzle that is At's universe, building it piece by piece, with each piece shown through the perspectives of many different characters and the events that surround them, even in the smallest of details. It rarely ever leans on plain exposition and instead masterfully hints at events or briefly mentions them at various points throughout the series, giving the audience the immense satisfaction of connecting the dots by themselves. (And I'm not talking about a few unrelated references sprinkled here and there, there are more than enough to make a seasoned easter egg-hunter orgasm.) And as more and more is revealed, you start to see how it all so satisfyingly relates and connects with each other. One thing you'd notice from Adventure Time is how the first few seasons and episodes are nearly entirely made up of just random silly adventures and one-shot stories to entertain the kids. Similar to episodic, "anthology" shows such as Rick and Morty, the beginning of the show is filled with seemingly unrelated events and stories. But soon, after a few seasons or so, all these events and adventures start to connect with each other and slowly but surely merge into a single cohesive plotline at the center of the show's story. Soon, the series starts to show the world- and character-building really starts to show as the characters get involved in much more serious and "mature" conflicts. And, yes, this is a formula that could easily be seen in many other plot-driven western cartoons. Gravity Falls, Steven Universe, Star Vs. the Forces of Evil, the list goes on. And all I can say about it is, personally, it never gets old. Besides, in AT it often seems to happen much more gradually. There are a lot of filler episodes, but if you're patient, it all pays off. The further into the show you go, the more you realize the gradual decrease in filler and the increase in more plot-driven episodes. You become quite accustomed to the chill, silly fillers that once the serious episodes start to kick into high gear, they pack a much bigger punch. Adventure Time eventually grew and developed from its more silly, carefree episodes to much more story-driven, heavy plotlines. And, while my extremely limited research has pointed to several people seeing that as a decline of the show, I could not disagree more. I love the more "mature" episodes much more and even feel like I grew up with them as they transitioned from random goofy adventures to actual serious conflicts, and it's nice to see how the characters developed. I believe it didn't decline in quality, but simply experienced a change in tone--a change that I'm more than on board with. The show started building a wonderful world with continuity and serious lore biz. They're developing characters from being one dimensional like they were in the first few seasons into very complex, relatable, fully-fledged characters. I personally become more excited for episodes and pay more attention to the details to see what it could mean to the story as a whole. And I really don't see how anyone could take that as a decline in quality. (Again, I researched next to nothing on this and didn't watch the show that critically, so please don't hesitate to destroy my arguments by telling me what people mean by AT's decline in quality if you do know UwU). --- Despite its impressive lore, Adventure Time still has a lot of heart, and its world-building and character-building go hand in hand seamlessly. As I've said before, the show matured over time, and many of the characters matured along with it. Each backstory, origin story, and plot element resonates richly with themes of friendship, heroism, love, as well as grief, trauma, and suffering. One episode you would be chuckling at some silly adventure and another episode you would be crying your eyes out. AT combines surrealism with heart, addressing our angsts and hopes and what it means to be alive. In contrast to its at-a-glance childlike appearance, it's full of progressive, grown-up themes. In the words of its creator, Pendelton Ward, "It's candyland on the surface and dark underneath, and that's why it's compelling, I think." There are also plenty of episodes dedicated to fleshing out and developing particular characters' arcs and relationships, allowing them to grow and have the audience more attached and empathized with them. Before you know it, you've become incredibly emotionally attached and invested in the lives of all these characters, you feel as if you might as well live among them and experience what they do. And nothing proves this more than the devastatingly bittersweet emotions that grip your heart as you finally leave all those characters at the series finale. There is a vast array of different character dynamics that ensure the audience never gets bored, whether characters are going on some carefree, silly adventure, forming long-lasting affections towards each other, or uncovering deep, existential truths about their past. While I definitely have my favorites, each character is unique in their own special way that really adds to the show's diversity and color. For all of its world-building, AT would be dull and empty without the many distinct personalities of its characters and their interactions. There are several character development arcs that really stick with me throughout the show. But off the top of my head, my favorite is probably the "Islands" miniseries. I don't wanna go too in-depth about this, since I could probably make a whole separate review specifically on it, but I feel like it's probably one of the best examples of the show's integration of character development into its world-building. We finally get information about what happened to all of the humans and the mystery behind Finn being the supposed last human in Ooo, and the characters even explore lands beyond Ooo itself. Multiple series of flashbacks, dreams, and visions slowly unfold the post-apocalyptic events of the past, depicting various recurring existential themes, and yet large parts of it remain unexplained to constantly keep the audience wondering. But at the same time, we get to witness and empathize with the strong, conflicting emotions within Finn as he learns the story behind his parents and his past. I'm especially fond of the scene where Finn says "I know about helping people" and thrusts his hand into the machine thingy to show his "digitalized" mother all his past experiences of helping those around him. This scene shows just how much Finn's character has developed over the show, culminating and building on all his past character developments, while also truly establishing how he sees Ooo as his true home and his strong connection with all his friends. All this deep characterization and messages about friendship, heroism, and home displayed beautifully in under 15 seconds. --- Adventure time is known for being Cartoon Network's weirdest show, and that couldn't be more true. It is irrepressibly creative, whether in storytelling, character design, or any other aspects. Some might even describe it as "experimental", especially nearing the later seasons, with many episodes being shown in new, different ways and styles that make it difficult to get bored of. People often refer to it as "trippy", which isn't a surprise due to its absurdity, fantastical elements, and apparent randomness. But the show is really more than that. Adventure Time is certainly surreal, but it adheres to a deeper, more earnest kind of surrealism that is distinct from some inchoate sense of oddity. One cool thing about it, though, is how it seems to treat all these crazy occurrences with a "casual air of indifference". This is a very hard and subjective thing for me to describe, but I have this specific liking towards shows with weird, supernatural elements but with characters that react to it in such a unique way. I guess I could even say this is one of the things that I like more about my favorite western cartoons than any anime I've ever watched. Not to say I used to hate anime or anything, but before I really got into it, I was always especially ticked off by how "overexaggerated" and dramatic the characters seemed to act to just about everything. (I know not all anime are like this but this is mostly from my premature exposure to all the slice of life anime my weeb friends watched that ended up being the way I saw most anime). This even made me uncomfortable in western cartoons that implemented Japanese influences, like the OG Teen Titans show (still love it to death tho). But the difference with Adventure Time is how most of the characters seem to act so chill about everything. This is probably just a weird and stupid whim of mine that I apply inconsistently to the media I've watched, but I somehow find much more of an appeal when, for instance, a huge life-changing supernatural event happens in someone's life and they just shrug it off as if it's something they deal with every day of their lives. I don't know how he does it but the specific personalities Pendleton Ward imbues into all his characters in even the tiniest reactions to things just makes me enjoy those kinds of characters so much. It's gone to the point where it's even shaped my own personality and made me want to experience all the freaky supernatural stuff they do every day. Also, I just have to bring up the blessing upon this world that is Marceline the Vampire Queen. To quote a friend, I don't understand how a character could be so visually plain in physical design but still so generally hot. Go ahead, chew me out for having a thing for edgy tsunderes, but believe me when I say her character arc is probably one of the best in the whole series. Her traumatic past, conflicts between being good and bad, and interaction with others has made her stand out more to me time and again. And her relationship with Simon over the centuries as well as the immense pain of having him slowly drift into madness was always one of the parts of AT that rang closest to my heart even when I was first watching it when I was 9 years old. --- As cliché as they may be, I am an absolute sucker for epic final showdown battles where all the main and supporting characters join forces and take a final stand against their biggest enemy. Like, imagine fights such as those at the end of Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame, battles that absolutely fill the screen and with each main character getting his or her own special moment onscreen. I squealed with utter glee when most of the recurring supporting cast in AT all entered the screen to face GOLB together in the final battle for Ooo, culminating in the most conclusive, ultimate clash of good and evil. This is where all the long processes of individual character developments and relationships over the course of 10 long seasons finally pay off, and every major character truly feels like a real person with real emotional significance that you relate a lot to. While all of that is truly a huge contribution to my enjoyment of the finale, however, what really amazed me about the ending was how there were able to actually tie everything together. As I was entering the final season I actually checked back on all the previous seasons several times because I thought I had skipped a season or two, since there were so many plotlines, possibilities, and loose ends still left unanswered. As I've mentioned before, adventure time has an amazingly vast world-building and many different events occurring at once, events that they don't always fully explain and oftentimes only hint at. The Lich, Orgalorg, Fern's spider parasite thingy, the Founders of the Islands: just to name a few out of many, many more "partially loose ends" that we still don't have that much detailed information about who they are and where they came from. And as I got closer and closer to the finale, little of these loose ends were actually ever brought up again, and out of the many equally interesting mysteries to choose from for its finale, AT only seemed to lean closer and closer towards one of them: the Gum War. (In the end, GOLB became the main issue of the finale, and he only ever made like 5 small appearances over the past 10 seasons). So I kept wondering (and even worrying) how it was gonna squeeze in and conclude all these mysteries that still haven't been fully explained. The answer: it simply did not. It still managed to pay sufficient homage to many of these mysteries without spending more than a few seconds with each, which was wonderful to see. But for the most part, it left unexplained all the things that weren't fully explained, which, now that I think about it, was probably the best move for it to make. It made sure that the show didn't over-bloat itself in attempting to address all of its lore, as all good stories must come to an end. And as much as I would really love to see the world-building fleshed out even more than it is, I love how it leaves an element of mystery, and, again, invites the audience to theorize and wonder for themselves. Words cannot express how happy I am for Bubbline. Absolutely beautiful. I could tell AT has been building up to this for seasons, and I love how well Bubblegum and Marceline's relationship has been developed episode by episode. Even though I don't advocate for LGBTQ, I believe this is a great example of LGBTQ representation in children's entertainment, being unabashedly positive, confident, and portrayed through amazing characters. It doesn't feel out of place or fan-service-y and shows how they truly care for each other, reflecting their connection with each other over hundreds of years in the best way possible. I also have to mention the genius of the last episode being set hundreds of years into the future and the final battle actually being a story being told by BMO at that point in time. It allowed for many characters, settings, and other elements to be shown far into the future after having changed over time, which I personally love to see in a series. That way, despite being the last episode, it expanded the show's lore even further through all its references and easter eggs. In the end, however, the show closed with a bittersweet conclusion that focuses less on lore or spectacle but instead on the series' profound message of fellowship. Although there are plenty of songs in AT, I was never really into the show for the songs as much as I was for, say, Steven Universe (except for all of Marceline's songs they have to make an album for all of them uninterrupted I swear to Glob). But I make a huge exception for the series finale's use of songs in ending the show. BMO's song, "Time Adventure", brought tears to my eyes as, more awesomely than any amount of lore, it portrayed the show's profound message of fellowship that it had been telling from the very beginning. It was an ingeniously simple yet beautiful way to simultaneously defeat GOLB and encapsulate the closeness between all the characters. The song unites all the major characters, showing how they're connected through all their adventures together. Even if those adventures may be lost to the past they're still happening, just at a different point in time--they'll never be limited by the constraints of time. It shows how, no matter what they go through, their friendship will happen, is happening, and has always happened. At the same time, I feel like the "Time Adventure" song speaks directly to those watching the series finale and are sad about the show ending. It tells us that "it seems unforgiving when a good thing ends", as all the characters and events of Adventure Time are about to move to the past for us as the series comes to a close. But Adventure Time, just like all events, will always be happening "back then". It will always remain in our hearts as memories of the past that we can always revisit. Finally, as touched as I was by BMO's song, I was even more so by The Island Song (the "Come Along with Me" song) at the very end of the finale. The best way to describe how it affected me is to quote Music Hole: it expresses a really specific feeling that's hard to describe. As the finale comes to an end, AT provides some final bittersweet closure in its montage of several different characters and the different experiences they're leading now, showing all the different "collections" of their adventures. It invites you to truly come along with all those characters on an unforgettable, timeless adventure. --- One more thing I have to say about AT is its specific blend of genres and archetypes that I am especially attracted to. I think I've finally found out the specific pattern that I like to see the most in all the things I've watched recently. I'm drawn to the prospect of the abnormal, anything out of the ordinary and different from the real world. Anything related to fantasy, sci-fi, or the supernatural would be enough to wow me into watching the entire show. BUT at the same time I love it when that fantasy is combined with beautiful character dynamics and relationships, be it friendship, brotherhood, parental love, or even romance. And I now understand how this well-balanced blend between fantasy world-building and characterization hooked me most in other media I've consumed, but it isn't until witnessing it in all its glory in AT that I truly realized it. The show throws all sorts of weird and supernatural wonders at you, but its characters are all human enough to make it feel real. You laugh with them, cry with them, fight alongside them. And this enables you to experience all the supernatural adventures they do. It becomes a personal journey. I watched this one special where Pendleton Ward explains how his main goal was to make the audience feel what the characters felt, and I truly applaud him for achieving that goal so well. While I technically did watch lots of AT as it was airing when I was still around 8-10 years old, I'd only recently decided to seriously "re-watch" it from beginning to end, and as this rant should well prove, I now see it in a very different light. It's become so much more than the goofy kiddie show I once saw it as and now holds a special place in my heart. I took this show in extremely slowly, "re-watching" it over the course of nearly half a year by sort of "slowly binging" it. I very slowly immersed myself in it to the point that it simply felt like another part of my life and I was convinced it would never end, so that when I finally arrived at the last two seasons I was shocked with how little I had left to watch. For some time I've already been preparing myself for the all-too-familiar shockwave of depression and loss to hit after the show ends, and yet it still hurts like hell. But just as the "Time Adventure" song says, it will always remain as memories of "back then". Still though, suffice to say, I will never get used to the feeling of witnessing the tearful fulfillment of a wholesome ending whole at the same time suffering the sheer melancholy of having it end at all.

    Right off the bat, I feel like the very first thing I just have to say about Adventure Time is its indisputably godly world-building. Even with that specific aspect in mind, I can hardly find where to begin. Hardly any Western cartoon I know comes close to the sheer vastness of Adventure Time's massive universe, or at least does nearly as well in drawing interest to it. One of my most favorite parts of the show is its complex, multi-layered dystopian backstory and how it's filled with all sorts of mysteries and adventures ready to be explored. The mystery around the series' post-apocalyptic setting is absolutely breathtaking. It becomes clear from the start that this world is much, much bigger than the main characters. And what I especially cannot get over is how exactly Adventure Time reveals this world to the audience. You don't actually realize the dystopian in the beginning, but after a few episodes you start to realize the ruins of modern-day roads and skyscrapers littered here and there, the giant crater in Earth, and occasional flashbacks referring to post-apocalyptic events. Once I did realize it, every detail that seemed to tie in with it never ceased to keep me at the edge of my seat. The lore is slowly uncovered and explained little by little through many different backstories, origins, and various other elements episode by episode, sometimes taking a peek millennia into the future and other times delving into the thick mysteries of the past. It stretches over countless points in time and space. Each episode adds to the massive, unending jigsaw puzzle that is At's universe, building it piece by piece, with each piece shown through the perspectives of many different characters and the events that surround them, even in the smallest of details. It rarely ever leans on plain exposition and instead masterfully hints at events or briefly mentions them at various points throughout the series, giving the audience the immense satisfaction of connecting the dots by themselves. (And I'm not talking about a few unrelated references sprinkled here and there, there are more than enough to make a seasoned easter egg-hunter orgasm.) And as more and more is revealed, you start to see how it all so satisfyingly relates and connects with each other. One thing you'd notice from Adventure Time is how the first few seasons and episodes are nearly entirely made up of just random silly adventures and one-shot stories to entertain the kids. Similar to episodic, "anthology" shows such as Rick and Morty, the beginning of the show is filled with seemingly unrelated events and stories. But soon, after a few seasons or so, all these events and adventures start to connect with each other and slowly but surely merge into a single cohesive plotline at the center of the show's story. Soon, the series starts to show the world- and character-building really starts to show as the characters get involved in much more serious and "mature" conflicts. And, yes, this is a formula that could easily be seen in many other plot-driven western cartoons. Gravity Falls, Steven Universe, Star Vs. the Forces of Evil, the list goes on. And all I can say about it is, personally, it never gets old. Besides, in AT it often seems to happen much more gradually. There are a lot of filler episodes, but if you're patient, it all pays off. The further into the show you go, the more you realize the gradual decrease in filler and the increase in more plot-driven episodes. You become quite accustomed to the chill, silly fillers that once the serious episodes start to kick into high gear, they pack a much bigger punch. Adventure Time eventually grew and developed from its more silly, carefree episodes to much more story-driven, heavy plotlines. And, while my extremely limited research has pointed to several people seeing that as a decline of the show, I could not disagree more. I love the more "mature" episodes much more and even feel like I grew up with them as they transitioned from random goofy adventures to actual serious conflicts, and it's nice to see how the characters developed. I believe it didn't decline in quality, but simply experienced a change in tone--a change that I'm more than on board with. The show started building a wonderful world with continuity and serious lore biz. They're developing characters from being one dimensional like they were in the first few seasons into very complex, relatable, fully-fledged characters. I personally become more excited for episodes and pay more attention to the details to see what it could mean to the story as a whole. And I really don't see how anyone could take that as a decline in quality. (Again, I researched next to nothing on this and didn't watch the show that critically, so please don't hesitate to destroy my arguments by telling me what people mean by AT's decline in quality if you do know UwU). --- Despite its impressive lore, Adventure Time still has a lot of heart, and its world-building and character-building go hand in hand seamlessly. As I've said before, the show matured over time, and many of the characters matured along with it. Each backstory, origin story, and plot element resonates richly with themes of friendship, heroism, love, as well as grief, trauma, and suffering. One episode you would be chuckling at some silly adventure and another episode you would be crying your eyes out. AT combines surrealism with heart, addressing our angsts and hopes and what it means to be alive. In contrast to its at-a-glance childlike appearance, it's full of progressive, grown-up themes. In the words of its creator, Pendelton Ward, "It's candyland on the surface and dark underneath, and that's why it's compelling, I think." There are also plenty of episodes dedicated to fleshing out and developing particular characters' arcs and relationships, allowing them to grow and have the audience more attached and empathized with them. Before you know it, you've become incredibly emotionally attached and invested in the lives of all these characters, you feel as if you might as well live among them and experience what they do. And nothing proves this more than the devastatingly bittersweet emotions that grip your heart as you finally leave all those characters at the series finale. There is a vast array of different character dynamics that ensure the audience never gets bored, whether characters are going on some carefree, silly adventure, forming long-lasting affections towards each other, or uncovering deep, existential truths about their past. While I definitely have my favorites, each character is unique in their own special way that really adds to the show's diversity and color. For all of its world-building, AT would be dull and empty without the many distinct personalities of its characters and their interactions. There are several character development arcs that really stick with me throughout the show. But off the top of my head, my favorite is probably the "Islands" miniseries. I don't wanna go too in-depth about this, since I could probably make a whole separate review specifically on it, but I feel like it's probably one of the best examples of the show's integration of character development into its world-building. We finally get information about what happened to all of the humans and the mystery behind Finn being the supposed last human in Ooo, and the characters even explore lands beyond Ooo itself. Multiple series of flashbacks, dreams, and visions slowly unfold the post-apocalyptic events of the past, depicting various recurring existential themes, and yet large parts of it remain unexplained to constantly keep the audience wondering. But at the same time, we get to witness and empathize with the strong, conflicting emotions within Finn as he learns the story behind his parents and his past. I'm especially fond of the scene where Finn says "I know about helping people" and thrusts his hand into the machine thingy to show his "digitalized" mother all his past experiences of helping those around him. This scene shows just how much Finn's character has developed over the show, culminating and building on all his past character developments, while also truly establishing how he sees Ooo as his true home and his strong connection with all his friends. All this deep characterization and messages about friendship, heroism, and home displayed beautifully in under 15 seconds. --- Adventure time is known for being Cartoon Network's weirdest show, and that couldn't be more true. It is irrepressibly creative, whether in storytelling, character design, or any other aspects. Some might even describe it as "experimental", especially nearing the later seasons, with many episodes being shown in new, different ways and styles that make it difficult to get bored of. People often refer to it as "trippy", which isn't a surprise due to its absurdity, fantastical elements, and apparent randomness. But the show is really more than that. Adventure Time is certainly surreal, but it adheres to a deeper, more earnest kind of surrealism that is distinct from some inchoate sense of oddity. One cool thing about it, though, is how it seems to treat all these crazy occurrences with a "casual air of indifference". This is a very hard and subjective thing for me to describe, but I have this specific liking towards shows with weird, supernatural elements but with characters that react to it in such a unique way. I guess I could even say this is one of the things that I like more about my favorite western cartoons than any anime I've ever watched. Not to say I used to hate anime or anything, but before I really got into it, I was always especially ticked off by how "overexaggerated" and dramatic the characters seemed to act to just about everything. (I know not all anime are like this but this is mostly from my premature exposure to all the slice of life anime my weeb friends watched that ended up being the way I saw most anime). This even made me uncomfortable in western cartoons that implemented Japanese influences, like the OG Teen Titans show (still love it to death tho). But the difference with Adventure Time is how most of the characters seem to act so chill about everything. This is probably just a weird and stupid whim of mine that I apply inconsistently to the media I've watched, but I somehow find much more of an appeal when, for instance, a huge life-changing supernatural event happens in someone's life and they just shrug it off as if it's something they deal with every day of their lives. I don't know how he does it but the specific personalities Pendleton Ward imbues into all his characters in even the tiniest reactions to things just makes me enjoy those kinds of characters so much. It's gone to the point where it's even shaped my own personality and made me want to experience all the freaky supernatural stuff they do every day. Also, I just have to bring up the blessing upon this world that is Marceline the Vampire Queen. To quote a friend, I don't understand how a character could be so visually plain in physical design but still so generally hot. Go ahead, chew me out for having a thing for edgy tsunderes, but believe me when I say her character arc is probably one of the best in the whole series. Her traumatic past, conflicts between being good and bad, and interaction with others has made her stand out more to me time and again. And her relationship with Simon over the centuries as well as the immense pain of having him slowly drift into madness was always one of the parts of AT that rang closest to my heart even when I was first watching it when I was 9 years old. --- As cliché as they may be, I am an absolute sucker for epic final showdown battles where all the main and supporting characters join forces and take a final stand against their biggest enemy. Like, imagine fights such as those at the end of Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame, battles that absolutely fill the screen and with each main character getting his or her own special moment onscreen. I squealed with utter glee when most of the recurring supporting cast in AT all entered the screen to face GOLB together in the final battle for Ooo, culminating in the most conclusive, ultimate clash of good and evil. This is where all the long processes of individual character developments and relationships over the course of 10 long seasons finally pay off, and every major character truly feels like a real person with real emotional significance that you relate a lot to. While all of that is truly a huge contribution to my enjoyment of the finale, however, what really amazed me about the ending was how there were able to actually tie everything together. As I was entering the final season I actually checked back on all the previous seasons several times because I thought I had skipped a season or two, since there were so many plotlines, possibilities, and loose ends still left unanswered. As I've mentioned before, adventure time has an amazingly vast world-building and many different events occurring at once, events that they don't always fully explain and oftentimes only hint at. The Lich, Orgalorg, Fern's spider parasite thingy, the Founders of the Islands: just to name a few out of many, many more "partially loose ends" that we still don't have that much detailed information about who they are and where they came from. And as I got closer and closer to the finale, little of these loose ends were actually ever brought up again, and out of the many equally interesting mysteries to choose from for its finale, AT only seemed to lean closer and closer towards one of them: the Gum War. (In the end, GOLB became the main issue of the finale, and he only ever made like 5 small appearances over the past 10 seasons). So I kept wondering (and even worrying) how it was gonna squeeze in and conclude all these mysteries that still haven't been fully explained. The answer: it simply did not. It still managed to pay sufficient homage to many of these mysteries without spending more than a few seconds with each, which was wonderful to see. But for the most part, it left unexplained all the things that weren't fully explained, which, now that I think about it, was probably the best move for it to make. It made sure that the show didn't over-bloat itself in attempting to address all of its lore, as all good stories must come to an end. And as much as I would really love to see the world-building fleshed out even more than it is, I love how it leaves an element of mystery, and, again, invites the audience to theorize and wonder for themselves. Words cannot express how happy I am for Bubbline. Absolutely beautiful. I could tell AT has been building up to this for seasons, and I love how well Bubblegum and Marceline's relationship has been developed episode by episode. Even though I don't advocate for LGBTQ, I believe this is a great example of LGBTQ representation in children's entertainment, being unabashedly positive, confident, and portrayed through amazing characters. It doesn't feel out of place or fan-service-y and shows how they truly care for each other, reflecting their connection with each other over hundreds of years in the best way possible. I also have to mention the genius of the last episode being set hundreds of years into the future and the final battle actually being a story being told by BMO at that point in time. It allowed for many characters, settings, and other elements to be shown far into the future after having changed over time, which I personally love to see in a series. That way, despite being the last episode, it expanded the show's lore even further through all its references and easter eggs. In the end, however, the show closed with a bittersweet conclusion that focuses less on lore or spectacle but instead on the series' profound message of fellowship. Although there are plenty of songs in AT, I was never really into the show for the songs as much as I was for, say, Steven Universe (except for all of Marceline's songs they have to make an album for all of them uninterrupted I swear to Glob). But I make a huge exception for the series finale's use of songs in ending the show. BMO's song, "Time Adventure", brought tears to my eyes as, more awesomely than any amount of lore, it portrayed the show's profound message of fellowship that it had been telling from the very beginning. It was an ingeniously simple yet beautiful way to simultaneously defeat GOLB and encapsulate the closeness between all the characters. The song unites all the major characters, showing how they're connected through all their adventures together. Even if those adventures may be lost to the past they're still happening, just at a different point in time--they'll never be limited by the constraints of time. It shows how, no matter what they go through, their friendship will happen, is happening, and has always happened. At the same time, I feel like the "Time Adventure" song speaks directly to those watching the series finale and are sad about the show ending. It tells us that "it seems unforgiving when a good thing ends", as all the characters and events of Adventure Time are about to move to the past for us as the series comes to a close. But Adventure Time, just like all events, will always be happening "back then". It will always remain in our hearts as memories of the past that we can always revisit. Finally, as touched as I was by BMO's song, I was even more so by The Island Song (the "Come Along with Me" song) at the very end of the finale. The best way to describe how it affected me is to quote Music Hole: it expresses a really specific feeling that's hard to describe. As the finale comes to an end, AT provides some final bittersweet closure in its montage of several different characters and the different experiences they're leading now, showing all the different "collections" of their adventures. It invites you to truly come along with all those characters on an unforgettable, timeless adventure. --- One more thing I have to say about AT is its specific blend of genres and archetypes that I am especially attracted to. I think I've finally found out the specific pattern that I like to see the most in all the things I've watched recently. I'm drawn to the prospect of the abnormal, anything out of the ordinary and different from the real world. Anything related to fantasy, sci-fi, or the supernatural would be enough to wow me into watching the entire show. BUT at the same time I love it when that fantasy is combined with beautiful character dynamics and relationships, be it friendship, brotherhood, parental love, or even romance. And I now understand how this well-balanced blend between fantasy world-building and characterization hooked me most in other media I've consumed, but it isn't until witnessing it in all its glory in AT that I truly realized it. The show throws all sorts of weird and supernatural wonders at you, but its characters are all human enough to make it feel real. You laugh with them, cry with them, fight alongside them. And this enables you to experience all the supernatural adventures they do. It becomes a personal journey. I watched this one special where Pendleton Ward explains how his main goal was to make the audience feel what the characters felt, and I truly applaud him for achieving that goal so well. While I technically did watch lots of AT as it was airing when I was still around 8-10 years old, I'd only recently decided to seriously "re-watch" it from beginning to end, and as this rant should well prove, I now see it in a very different light. It's become so much more than the goofy kiddie show I once saw it as and now holds a special place in my heart. I took this show in extremely slowly, "re-watching" it over the course of nearly half a year by sort of "slowly binging" it. I very slowly immersed myself in it to the point that it simply felt like another part of my life and I was convinced it would never end, so that when I finally arrived at the last two seasons I was shocked with how little I had left to watch. For some time I've already been preparing myself for the all-too-familiar shockwave of depression and loss to hit after the show ends, and yet it still hurts like hell. But just as the "Time Adventure" song says, it will always remain as memories of "back then". Still though, suffice to say, I will never get used to the feeling of witnessing the tearful fulfillment of a wholesome ending whole at the same time suffering the sheer melancholy of having it end at all.

  • Apr 14, 2020

    Adventure time is something nostalgic to me. It's been around since I was a kid, and I grew up on it. I took the time to watch this show with someone, and even though she hadn't seen most of the seasons/episodes, we still cried over this together. This show is a testament to what friendship, brotherhood, love, death, everything, is about. And I think this show does a great job to throw in plenty witty commentary, much more than a "kids show" would. And it's also a testament to how sometimes, you just do something because it's what you believe is right, and this show is something I believe, if you have any interest in watching it, you NEED to watch. This show is a must see. It had it's ups and downs, but the ups stay with you, the mind-blowing moments will leave an impression on you for a lifetime. 10/10

    Adventure time is something nostalgic to me. It's been around since I was a kid, and I grew up on it. I took the time to watch this show with someone, and even though she hadn't seen most of the seasons/episodes, we still cried over this together. This show is a testament to what friendship, brotherhood, love, death, everything, is about. And I think this show does a great job to throw in plenty witty commentary, much more than a "kids show" would. And it's also a testament to how sometimes, you just do something because it's what you believe is right, and this show is something I believe, if you have any interest in watching it, you NEED to watch. This show is a must see. It had it's ups and downs, but the ups stay with you, the mind-blowing moments will leave an impression on you for a lifetime. 10/10