American Experience: Season 15 (2002 - 2003)

SEASON:

Season 15
American Experience

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

Not enough ratings to
calculate a score.

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 0

No Score Yet

Audience Score

User Ratings: 0

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)



  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

Episodes

Air date: Nov 11, 2002

On January 20, 1977, president-elect Jimmy Carter surprised onlookers by walking the length of Pennsylvania Avenue to his inauguration. To many this offered the perfect symbol for the former peanut farmer who would be president. James Earl Carter, Jr. was born in Plains, Georgia on October 1, 1924. A hardworking student, he received an appointment to the United States Navel Academy during World War II. After graduation, he married Rosalynn Smith and pursued a career in the Navy. Following Earl Carter's (Jimmy's father) death in 1953, the couple returned to Plains where they rebuilt the family business into a successful peanut farm. Highly driven, however, Carter soon became restless and decided to run for public office for the first time in 1962. Jimmy Who? offers a fluid overview of these events by combining rare film footage and interviews with friends, colleagues, and historians. The segment climaxes with Carter's attempts to pass legislation during his first year as president.

View Details
Air date: Nov 12, 2002

The second part of Jimmy Carter concentrates on the 39th president's last three years in office and his post-presidential accomplishments. By the time Carter entered the second year of his presidency, his administration had already bogged down in legislative battles and economic difficulties. Carter nonetheless persevered, signing the Panama Canal Treaty and arranging for a peace accord between Israel and Egypt at Camp David in 1978. These accomplishments, however, seemed to mean little once American hostages were taken at the U.S. Embassy in Iran at the end of 1979. The hostages would remain in captivity for 444 days and remain unreleased until Ronald Reagan became president in 1981. Carter returned to the public spotlight in 1984 when he began working with Habitat for Humanity. In 1986, groundwork began on the Carter Center, a facility designed to arrange peaceful solutions to world conflicts. In 2002 Carter became the first president to visit Cuba in over 40 years and he also received the Nobel Peace Prize. Jimmy Carter is a well-balanced portrait that includes rare film footage and a number of interviews with colleagues and historians.

View Details
Air date: Jan 13, 2003

"Mudhole to Metropolis" is part one of American Experience: Chicago - City of the Century, based on the book by Don Miller. David Ogden Stiers narrates. The story begins in 1673, when French explorers took a canoe up the Illinois River and found a smelly marshland that the Indians called Chicagoua. The French chose not to settle there and the area was used as a fur trading post until the 1800s. When the Erie Canal was finished, the marsh was a good way to link the Mississippi to the Great Lakes. By 1833, the Potawatomi tribe was forced out and white men from New England bought up the land. Then the Irish immigrants who had dug the Erie Canal arrived looking for work. The city's first mayor, William Butler Ogden, helped make Chicago the world's largest railroad hub, lumber market, and grain port. The city experienced an economic boom until the great Chicago Fire of 1871. Over three miles of the city was destroyed. This program was originally broadcast on PBS in January of 2003.

View Details
Air date: Jan 14, 2003

"The Revolution Has Begun" is part two of American Experience: Chicago - City of the Century, based on the book by Don Miller. David Ogden Stiers narrates. After the Chicago Fire of 1871, the city began to rebuild. Marshall Fields opens his dream department store on State Street and Cyrus McCormick rebuilds his reaper plant. But the big industry becomes cattle dealing, led by butcher Gustavus Swift. Immigrants from Eastern Europe flock to the city to work as meatpackers. The immigrants bring socialism with them, helping to jump-start the American labor movement. In 1886, a labor activist rally becomes violent in Chicago's Haymarket Square. Workers on strike from the reaper factory are killed by police during a riot, leading to a bombing. This program was originally broadcast on PBS in January of 2003.

View Details
Air date: Jan 15, 2003

"Battle for Chicago" is part three of American Experience: Chicago - City of the Century, based on the book by Don Miller. David Ogden Stiers narrates. After the Haymarket Square incident, the unified work force was defeated and crime was on the rise. The various European immigrants in Chicago created ethnic ghettos in opposition to one another. Prostitution, corruption, and drug use increased. In 1889, social reformer Jane Addams established Hull House, a settlement house in the West Side that offered free social services and education for poor people. Social changes led to the construction of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Field Museum of Natural History, and the Auditorium Theater. Chicago was named the site for the 1893 World's Fair. This program was originally broadcast on PBS in January of 2003.

View Details
Air date: Jan 20, 2003

In August 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black youth from Chicago, was visiting relatives near the town of Money, MS. Leaving a small grocery store, Emmett allegedly whistled at the white woman behind the counter. Though he didn't know it at the time, the teenager had broken a cardinal rule in the Jim Crow South -- and within a few days, his battered and mutilated body was found in the Tallahatchie River. After an all-too-speedy trial, the white men accused of murdering Till were acquitted, but a few years later unashamedly "confessed" to their crime in a national magazine. Emmett's mother Mamie Till Mobley had known all along that a black person could not expect fair treatment in the lily-white South, but she was not about to bury the incident along with her son's body. Grimly and defiantly, Mamie insisted that Emmett's body not be cosmetically altered by the undertaker, but that the boy's ravaged and befouled corpse be displayed in an open coffin for all to see. Photographs of this grisly site were widely distributed by the leading black-oriented publications of the period, eliciting nationwide outrage from blacks and whites alike. As an end result of Emmett's horrible death, the comparatively dormant Civil Rights movement of the late '40s and early '50s was suddenly jump-started back to life. The winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, the 60-minute documentary The Murder of Emmett Till made its public-TV debut as part of the American Experience anthology in January 2003 -- a scant few weeks after the death of Mamie Till Mobley.

View Details
Air date: Jan 27, 2003

Documentary filmmakers offer a fascinating look at one of the most spectacular engineering feats of the 19th Century as the story of the Transcontinental Railroad comes to life in a film that's sure to appeal to historians and railroad enthusiasts alike. As legions of tireless workers toiled for six years to realize the vision of shady entrepreneurs and imaginative engineers, the remarkable railway dream slowly became a reality. But not everyone was so pleased with the remarkable achievement. Despite the devastating effect that the tremendous transportation breakthrough would have on the Native American population, the lasting impact of the Transcontinental Railroad on the politics and culture of a rapidly expanding country would forever mark it as an invaluable component of the American success story.

View Details
Air date: Feb 10, 2003

This 60-minute entry in the PBS American Experience anthology chronicles the unorthodox medical partnership between Alfred Blalock, chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, and Vivien Thomas, a black man with little more than a high school education. When Thomas applied for a janitorial post at Johns Hopkins in the early '40s, Blalock was impressed by the man's medical knowledge and took him on as a technician. Ultimately, it was Thomas who, in 1944, designed the surgical procedure to correct what was then known as "blue baby syndrome." But racial barriers being what they were at the time, his contributions went ignored, and Blalock reluctantly accepted all the credit. It was not until 1976 that the medical profession formally recognized Thomas with an honorary doctorate. Partners of the Heart combines straight newsreel footage and still pictures with dramatized recreations of the events.

View Details
Air date: Feb 24, 2003

This entry in the PBS documentary series American Experience traces the history of the birth control pill, from the moment of FDA approval in 1960 to the present day. The Pill also generously provides the backstory to its subject matter, detailing older and less reliable forms of contraception, the occasional criminalization of and ongoing religious resistance to birth control, and the tireless efforts of such pioneers as Margaret Sanger, Katherine McCormick, biological researcher Gregory Pincus and Catholic gynecologist John Rock to develop a safe and universally acceptable method of reigning in the so-called "population explosion." The more controversial aspects of the subject are also fully chronicled, including the dangerous side effects attending early testing of the pill in Puerto Rico. Using archival footage, still pictures, and interviews with women whose lives were forever altered by being allowed to have "power over their ovaries" (to quote one observer), The Pill is narrated by actress Blair Brown.

View Details
Air date: Apr 7, 2003

During the fall of Saigon in 1975, countless children were separated from their parents during the final, frantic rush to escape Vietnam before the Communist takeover. Among the kids airlifted to safety was a 7-year-old Amerasian girl named Heidi Bub, born to a Vietnamese mother and an American serviceman. Growing up with her adoptive family in Tennessee, the adult Heidi regarded herself as American through and through, yet the opportunity to return to her homeland in 1997 proved irresistible. Anticipating a joyful reunion with her birth mother Mai Thi Kim, Heidi was not disappointed -- at least not at first. But it did not take long for disillusionment to set in, as Heidi began to rebel against her mother's overbearing displays of affection, exacerbated by the strained relationship between Heidi and her new-found Vietnamese brother. Having assumed that the inevitable clash of cultures would not affect her feelings for her original family, Heidi came to realize that "happy endings" were neither automatic nor guaranteed. Produced for the PBS documentary series American Experience, Daughter from Danang was given a brief theatrical release in January 2002, subsequently winning the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival and earning an Academy Award nomination. The film finally made its TV bow in April 2003.

View Details
Show More Episodes

American Experience: Season 15 Photos

Tv Season Info

Critic Reviews for American Experience: Season 15

There are no critic reviews yet for Season 15. Keep checking Rotten Tomatoes for updates!

Audience Reviews for American Experience: Season 15

News & Features