Bonanza: Season 11 (1969 - 1970)


Season 11
Bonanza

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

Not enough ratings to
calculate a score.

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 0

No Score Yet

Audience Score

User Ratings: 0

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)



  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

Episodes

Air date: Sep 14, 1969

The "Don Quixote" legend was given a 19th century western spin on Bonanza's inaugural eleventh-season entry "Another Windmill to Go." The Cartwrights are dumbstruck when they find Don Q. Hought (Laurence Naismath) rowing a wheeled boat across their grazing land. But Don Q. is not as daffy as he seems: His main purpose in life is to challenge obscure-and very silly-Federal laws. Also seen are Jill Townsend as Abbey, Bart Larue as Walters, Gregg Palmer as Benson and character comedian George Furth (who'd recently co-authored the hit Broadway musical Company) as Horace Keylot. Written by Palmer Thompson, "Another Windmill to Go" first aired on September 14, 1969, and was later selected by NBC for an "encore presentation" in the Summer of 1972.

View Details
Air date: Sep 21, 1969

Melissa Murphy is cast as Jenny Winters, who claims she can identify the outlaw Logan gang as the men who robbed a stagecoach and murdered the driver. Hoping to protect Jenny from the Logans, Joe Cartwright and Candy offer the girl shelter at the Ponderosa. What neither the good guys nor the bad guys know is that Jenny is a chronic liar, whose "eyewitness" yarn is a total fabrication. Others in the cast include Stefan Gierasch as Orvil Winters, Connie Hines as Hilda, Alan Baxter as Jim, and Bo Hopkins as Stretch. First shown on September 21, 1969, "The Witness" was written by Joel Murcott.

View Details
Air date: Sep 28, 1969

Sheriff Austin (Pat Hingle) of Stillwater jails Candy on the basis of highly suspicious eyewitness testimony. Not only does Austin refuse to tell Candy that he's suspected of robbery and murder, but he also refuses to inform the Cartwrights of their top hand's whereabouts. Why is the Sheriff behaving in this fashion, and how long will it be before the situation devolves into tragedy? Strother Martin appears as Lonnie, while Jackie Gleason Show semi-regular Frank Marth is seen as Barnum. Written by Preston Wood, "The Silence at Stillwater" originally aired on September 28, 1969.

View Details
Air date: Oct 5, 1969

While Sheriff Coffee testifies at a trial in San Francisco, Hoss Cartwright serves as temporary sheriff of Virginia City. Before long, Hoss has outraged and astonished the townsfolk by locking up millionaire Paul Forbes (Robert Emhardt) and his valet Fairfax (Jay Novello), for reasons which remain unclear throughout most of the episode. Conversely, Hoss refuses to accommodate troublemaker Hiram Peabody (Tom Bosley), who desperately wants to be arrested so he can escape his impending marriage to Cissie Summers (Melinda Dillon). First telecast on October 5, 1969, the lighthearted "A Lawman's Lot is Not a Happy One" was written by Robert Vincent Wright.

View Details
Air date: Oct 12, 1969

When Will Griner (Walter Barnes) is acquitted of murder, the angry townsfolk, convinced that the trial was rigged in Will's favor, organize a lynch mob. It is up to the Cartwrights, Candy, and Sherriff Coffee to protect Will throughout a long and violent night. Meanwhile, Ben quietly re-opens the murder case to see if, indeed, Will was as guilty as the townspeople claim. The supporting cast includes Guy Stockwell as John Degnan, Ellen Weston as Louise Thurston, Ted Gehring as Jim, Stacy Harris as Teague, Tyler McVey as Al, and Mills Watson as Pete. Written by Preston Wood, "Anatomy of a Lynching" was initially telecast on October 12, 1969.

View Details
Air date: Oct 19, 1969

An epidemic of rustling has fueled the flames of a possible range war between the cattlemen and the nesters. Ex-sheriff Dan Logan (Steve Forrest) is hired to stop the war before it starts, while rancher Slater (Warren Kemmerling), convinced that the nesters are responsible for the trouble, offers a $300 dollar reward for every rustler brought in by Logan, dead or alive. The Cartwrights become involved when Slater himself commits murder, then tries to frame Logan for the crime. A poignant subplot involves Logan's efforts to reform an ex-prostitute named Anita (Miriam Colom), a denizen of Viriginia City's notorious D Street. First shown on October 19, 1969, "To Stop a War" was written by Carey Wilbur.

View Details
Air date: Oct 26, 1969

Dean Stockwell guest-stars as Mathew, a former Northern war hero and Congressional Medal of Honor Winner, now living a pauper's existence in Nevada. Ben Cartwright comes to Mathew's aid when the man is victimized by Seth Nagel (Harry Townes), a Southerner determined to avenge the loss of his home and family at the hands of the Yankees. The plot goes off on a rivetting tangent when Seth's daughter Lori (Susan Howard) befriends the beleagured Mathew. Written by Frank Chase, "The Medal" was originally broadcast on October 26, 1969.

View Details
Air date: Nov 2, 1969

Candy is forced to kill the rancher husband of Lisa Campbell (Charlotte Stewart) in self-defense. Hoping to overcome Lisa's bitterness, Candy goes to work for her as a ranchhand. Ultimately, love blossoms between the two-but Lisa has already hired gunslinger Jake (Lloyd Battista) to kill Candy, and Jake refuses to back down from the job. Scripted by Star Trek stalwart D.C. Fontana, "The Stalker" first aired on November 2, 1969, then was selected by NBC for an encore presentation in the summer of 1972.

View Details
Air date: Nov 16, 1969

Originally telecast on November 16, 1969, "Meena" was the first of three Bonanza episodes featuring the troublesome Calhouns. When Joe Cartwright is kidnapped by bumbling crooks Jesse (Victor French), Owen (Robert Donner), and Virge (George Morgan), he is rescued by pretty Meena Calhoun (Ann Prentiss) and brought to the girl's home, an abandoned gold mine. Almost immediately, Meena's ill-tempered prospector father Luke (Dub Taylor) tries to force a marriage between his daughter and Joe. Meanwhile, the trio of would-be kidnappers refocus their energies on stealing the gold which they believe that Luke has salted away. "Meena" was written by Jack B. Sowards.

View Details
Air date: Nov 23, 1969

Joe Cartwright is dumbfounded when his friend, bank employee Wade Turner (Gregory Walcott), abruptly leaves town before his marriage to his sweetheart Sarah (Sandra Smith). Wade's abrupt exit coincides with a shortage in the bank's accounts, prompting Joe to seek out his friend and demand an explanation. But no one knows the real reason for Wade's departure: he is slowly dying of a brain tumor. Featured in the cast is a young Dabney Coleman as Clyde. Written by John Hawkins, Jonathan Knopf and B.W. Sandefur, "A Darker Shadow" originally aired on November 23, 1969.

View Details
Show More Episodes

Bonanza: Season 11 Photos

Tv Season Info

Critic Reviews for Bonanza: Season 11

There are no critic reviews yet for Season 11. Keep checking Rotten Tomatoes for updates!

Audience Reviews for Bonanza: Season 11

News & Features