Narcos: Mexico: Season 2 Reviews

February 19, 2020
Narcos: Mexico is still comfort food for crime-drama lovers, but there are additional spices for extra kick. Those who indulge will once again be seduced into binging rather than savoring this juiced-up course.
February 18, 2020
Cartel dramas like Narcos are fairy tales for a nation in decline, flattening diverse and complicated countries for the benefit of a nation that refuses to acknowledge the havoc it has wreaked on the world.
February 18, 2020
This show is more addictive than Felix's product.
February 14, 2020
Narcos: Mexico season two feels more like a docudrama than a drama - just one without captions to tell you who everyone is...
February 14, 2020
This second season of Narcos: Mexico... is perhaps the the harshest, the most violent, and the most pertinent yet.
February 14, 2020
What makes it endlessly intriguing is the way it mixes history and intricate character development.
February 12, 2020
As ever, it's exquisitely written, cast and shot, making great use of Mexico's stunning landscapes, opulent haciendas and colourful '80s fashions. The series does a fine job too of keeping the viewer straight about a big cast of characters.
February 10, 2020
Though it wanders in its middle episodes, Narcos: Mexico remains a finely written drama that loves to wow us with facts and maps even more than twists born from violent turns (which are, nevertheless, exceptionally effective).
Full Review | Original Score: 9.2/10
February 10, 2020
It's a violent, bloody showcase, one where you get to know these characters so well as they march toward hell.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
February 10, 2020
At its best, Narcos: Mexico recalls The Godfather Part II, with Gallardo recalling Michael Corleone. His success backs him into a lonely corner because his ambition outlasts his intimate relationships. And his most intriguing relationship is with Mexico.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
February 6, 2020
So much of 'Narcos: Mexico' is built on the brazen violence of it all, but it's the blatant corruption that's just as grimly compelling.