The West Wing: Season 6 (2004 - 2005)

SEASON:

Season 6
The West Wing

Critics Consensus

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50%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 6

92%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 106
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Episodes

1
Air date: Oct 20, 2004
2
Air date: Oct 27, 2004
3
Air date: Nov 3, 2004
4
Air date: Nov 10, 2004
5
Air date: Nov 17, 2004
6
Air date: Nov 24, 2004
7
Air date: Dec 1, 2004
8
Air date: Dec 8, 2004
9
Air date: Dec 15, 2004
10
Air date: Jan 5, 2005
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The West Wing: Season 6 Photos

Tv Season Info

Martin Sheen, as President Josiah Bartlet, continues to lead an acclaimed ensemble cast. The West Wing enters its sixth season with a total of 25 Emmy® Awards.

Cast

Martin Sheen
as President Josiah `Jed' Bartlet
John Spencer
as Leo McGarry
Janel Moloney
as Donna Moss
Stockard Channing
as First Lady Abigail Bartlet
Joshua Malina
as Will Bailey
Dulé Hill
as Charlie Young
Allison Janney
as C.J. Cregg
Richard Schiff
as Toby Ziegler
Mary McCormack
as Kate Harper
Gary Cole
as Vice President Robert Russell
Kristin Chenoweth
as Annabeth Schott
Lily Tomlin
as Debbie Fiderer
Tim Matheson
as John Hoynes
Teri Polo
as Helen Santos
Mark Feuerstein
as Cliff Calley
Elisabeth Moss
as Zoey Bartlet
Sam Robards
as Greg Brock
Ed O'Neill
as Sen. Chris Carrick
Ivan Allen
as CNN Anchor
Penny Griego
as Newscaster
Terry O'Quinn
as Gen. Alexander
Steve Ryan
as Hutchinson
Stephen Root
as Bob Meyer
Natalija Nogulich
as Shira Galit
Annabeth Gish
as Elizabeth Bartlet Westin
Brett Cullen
as Gov. Ray Sullivan
Ron Silver
as Bruno Gianelli
Steven Eckholdt
as Doug Westin
Joe Egender
as Santos Volunteer
Roger Rees
as Lord John Marbury
Christopher Lloyd
as Prof. Lawrence Lessig
Miriam Shor
as Christine
Jay Brazeau
as Mackey Lowell
Anna Deavere Smith
as Nancy McNally
Ben Murray
as Curtis
Kevin Hare
as Chicken Bob
Mel Harris
as Sen. Rafferty
Brian Dennehy
as Sen. Rafe Framhagen
Don S. Davis
as Rev. Pat Butler
Charlotte Colavin
as Sheila Fields
Mako
as Yosh Takahashi
Tim Kelleher
as Dylan Clark
Joe Ochman
as News Director
Darren Robertson
as Congressional Staffer
Castulo Guerra
as Gil Garcia
Marlee Matlin
as Joey Lucas
Mannuel Urrego
as Civil Man
Penn Jillette
as Penn Jillette
Teller
as Teller
Mary-Pat Green
as Vermont Congressman
Michelle Courtney
as Lisa Stanhower
Gabe Cohen
as Studio Director
Ernie Lively
as Georgia Congressman
Michael Kagan
as FBI Director Arnold
Scott Macdonald
as Cyrus Yolander
Mark Joe Packer
as Technician
Nathan Brooks Burgess
as Junior Arkansas
Jason Isaacs
as Colin Ayres
Alex Fernandez
as Andy Lazon
Tom Chick
as Gordon
J.F. Davis
as Bartender
Jerry Levitan
as TV Producer
Judy Jean Berns
as Betty Moss
Wesley Harris
as Moderator
Ann Ducati
as Maya Zahavy
Ray Wise
as Gov. Gabe Tillman
P.J. Byrne
as David Orbitz
Kevin West
as Randy Wysniewsky
Kent Shockneck
as Anchorman
Ann Marie Howard
as Christine Korb
Eli Danker
as Gidon Mazar
Alex Manette
as Reporter
Ruben Garfias
as Rep. Freddy Cabrera
Bob Bayliss
as Johnson
Marcelo Tubert
as Saeb Mukaret
Pamela Salem
as Prime Minister Graty
John O'Brien
as Reporter
Ken Strunk
as Republican Congressman
Livia Trevino
as Reporter
Joyce Guy
as Charlayne
Jonathan Goldstein
as Knocking Congressman
Eric Cazenave
as Reporter
Richard Hilton
as Convention Secretary
Fred Ornstein
as Older Congressman
Tim Lounibos
as Dr. Leahy
Claudia Lynx
as Miss Universe
Ben Siegler
as Reporter
Novella Nelson
as Gail Fitzwallace
Carol Avery
as Maryland Congressman
Shannon O'Hurley
as Susan Wertz
Brent Schraff
as Kid in the Back
Will MacMillan
as Davis Adams
Cheryl Carter
as Younger Congresswoman
Derek Coleman
as Secret Service
James Lashly
as Canadian Ambassador
David St. James
as Rep. Gibson
Vincent Guastaferro
as Ernie Gambelli
Paul Webster
as TV Pundit
Leesa Severyn
as AFT Anchor
Annie Morgan
as Vinick Staffer
Mark L. Taylor
as Chairman Rorsche
Anneliza Scott
as Second Nurse
Matt McKenzie
as TV Speaker
Petrea Burchard
as California Delegation Chief
Nancy Linari
as TV Speaker
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Critic Reviews for The West Wing Season 6

All Critics (6) | Top Critics (4)

It has the all-time worst West Wing episode, where we learn that Leo and Kate Harper's paths once crossed in Cuba, because hey, might as well be "Lost" now.

Jun 27, 2018 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Political strategy collides with principle and it's not pretty. But the battle between them is smartly paced and superbly written, offering a penetrating insight into campaign politics.

Nov 6, 2018 | Full Review…

There should be term limits for television presidents. And one term was just right for The West Wing. The prolongation of one of the best and most popular dramas on television is brave and at times bold, but often it is painful to watch.

Jun 27, 2018 | Full Review…

No more moments of sinus-clogging idealism in which the actors almost sob with Emmy-moment rectitude; cranky, shaken, and calculating, this is a White House we can relate to. It's a divider, not a uniter.

Aug 30, 2017 | Full Review…

The West Wing is finally back on dry land.

Oct 18, 2017 | Rating: 5/5 | Full Review…

The show has locked itself into philosophical stasis, determined to air its liberal credentials via Bartlett and his staff yet equally determined never to challenge the status quo.

Jun 27, 2018 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The West Wing: Season 6

  • Dec 21, 2019
    After an awkward and uneven season 5, this season finally finds it feet again, albeit not straight away, and even when it does it still finds time to stumble here and there. The first few episodes were pure soap-opera, and about as true to West Wing norms as trying to make South Park into a serious political drama. Those early episodes were pretty awful in relative terms, probably because the writers from S5 still couldn't find the right Sorkin ingredients to return to the show to past glories. However, by mid season and a change of tack from the melodramas of Gaza and the Israel Palestine Question, to a more familiar trip towards the forthcoming presidential nominations, and the arrival of two fresh faces - Jimmy "Santos" Smits, and Alan "Vinick" Alda. The story arc for those two characters, along with the departure of Donna and Josh out of the White House and onto the campaign trail, was a breath of much needed air. Even the writing improved by a small margin, and it was also good to be outside, and seeing middle America rather than been stuck in dark rooms and corridors of the White House. The season still had some pretty bad episodes, the worst being "90 Miles Away". But by and large TWW had found its feet again, and come the final episodes I was begging for more!
  • Oct 17, 2018
    I was a fan of the West Wing during it's initial run. I've been re-watching it on Netflix after all these years. It's still one of the best shows ever and holds up well even with the passing of time. But Season 6 is in a league of it's own. The writing around the Jimmy Smits character and Josh and the campaign is phenomenal. Highly recommended.
  • Jun 15, 2017
    The consistency of this show is remarkable. What was anticipated in the previous season has come to full bloom in this season: characters sacrificing trust among friends for a great leap towards a better future. We see the familiar cast grasping the coming loss of time in the West Wing, acting in whatever ways to either prolong time there or act radically under the assumption that they have only a year left. We can see that the characters care about humanity as a whole, yet they so easily throw their closest friends to the curb. Come for the politics, stay for the drama.
  • Aug 16, 2015
    My favorite Drama Show
  • May 31, 2015
    one of my favorite tv show ever
  • Sep 08, 2014
    In some ways Series 6 and 7 are the most interesting series. They bring the presidency full circle, as we see the campaigning for who is going to be the next president. Less smugness, less folksyness, less Toby, less Will - these are all very good things. We also have Jimmy Smits and Alan Alda acting out of their skins. Alda is so convincing and likable that, even though he is supposed to be the bad guy, you want to vote for him. It's not all good, however. There are still the preachy, idealistic, naive detours. Plus, seeing a presidential campaign in action reminds me of all the reasons I hate politics: the superficiality, the appearances-are-everything conceit, the pandering to the media, the soundbites for the sake of it, the money spent (wasted), the back-stabbing, the horse-trading.
  • May 27, 2014
    a very addictive tv series. But along the way you do get tired of the way the democrats are shown as saviors and republicans the very bad people so felt like a preaching type an elitist agenda. At time so many geographical issues I have observed but all this is nit-picking and nothing else. Overall I love this show.

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