The Andy Griffith Show: Season 6 (1965 - 1966)


Season 6
The Andy Griffith Show

Critics Consensus

No consensus yet.

Not enough ratings to
calculate a score.

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 0

No Score Yet

Audience Score

User Ratings: 2

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)



  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this season

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of this tv season? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

Episodes

Air date: Sep 13, 1965

Switching from black-and-white to color at the outset of its sixth season, The Andy Griffth Show began "the color years" with the episode titled "Opie's Job" (actually the series' second color episode). After wrecking his bike, Opie tries out for a box-boy job at Foley's Market. He wins the position over another boy, Billy Crenshaw (John Bangert), then discovers that Billy needs the job more than he does. Generously, Opie arranges to get himself fired-and, naturally, his dad Andy misunderstands. "Opie's Job" first aired on September 13, 1965.

View Details
Air date: Sep 20, 1965

Schoolteacher Helen Crump invites handsome, worldly and erudite fellow teacher Frank Smith (Charles Aidman) to supper at Andy's house, with the expected jealous reaction from Andy. Things get worse-at least so far as Andy is concerned-when Helen starts breaking dates to work with Frank on an upcoming educational project. It looks like Andy is due for another lesson in human nature, and he certainly learns that lesson by episode's end. First broadcast September 20, 1965, "Andy's Rival" was written by Lawrence Marks.

View Details
Air date: Sep 27, 1965

Bernard Fox makes a return visit to The Andy Griffith Show in the role of resourceful Britisher Malcolm Merriwether. This time around, Andy appoints Malcolm as Mayberry's crossing guard, replacing the unreliable Ernest T. Bass. Outraged, Ernest T. invokes his Irish heritage and challenges the "British-ter" to a fist fight. Fully aware that Ernest will probably slaughter Malcolm (especially since the Englishman is taking boxing lessons from Goober!), Andy has to do some mighty quick thinking. Written by Harvey Bullock and first telecast September 27, 1965, "Malcolm at the Crossroads" represented the final Andy Griffith Show appearances of both Malcolm Merriwether and Ernest T. Bass.

View Details
Air date: Oct 4, 1965

Aunt Bee finds a soulmate in the form of retired US Congressman John Canfield (Charlie Ruggles). Before long, both of the oldsters are behaving like schoolkids-and wearing each other out in the process. "Aunt Bee, the Swinger" was the first color episode of The Andy Griffith Show, albeit the fourth such episode to be telecast, on October 4, 1965. It was scripted by Jack Elinson as his first series contribution minus his longtime writing partner Charles Stewart.

View Details
Air date: Oct 11, 1965

Jack Burns joins the series as Andy's overzealous new deputy Warren Ferguson. Even more of a "letter of the law" stickler than his predecessor Barney Fife, Warren immediately makes his mark by arresting several bingo-playing old ladies for gambling. When he refuses to drop the charges, Andy has to figure out a way to "humanize" Warren. Written by Ben Joelson and Art Baer, "The Bazaar" first aired on October 11, 1965.

View Details
Air date: Oct 18, 1965

Andy's new deputy Warren Ferguson is convinced that he, Warren, has psychic powers. When Andy and Helen refuse to heed his warnings of an impending accident, Warren decides to teach them a lesson by carefully staging the aforementioned mishap. Written by Fred Freeman and Lawrence J. Cohen, "A Warning from Warren" was filmed after The Andy Griffith Show's "Hollywood arc" (the three episodes wherein Andy goes to Hollywood with Aunt Bee and Opie), but telecast earlier, on October 18, 1965. In fact, it was originally slated to air on October 11, until the producers opted to "introduce" the character of Warren with the episode titled "The Bazaar."

View Details
Air date: Oct 25, 1965

The Belmont Film Company of Hollywood decides to make a feature film about Andy's life and career, titled Sheriff Without a Gun. Accordingly, the studio sends Andy a check for $1000-and before long, everyone has come out of the woodwork to advise Andy how best to spend his sudden windfall. Finally, Andy decides to use the money to visit Hollywood, with Aunt Bee and Opie in tow. The first installment of the three-episode "Hollywood arc," "Off to Hollywood" was written by Bill Idelson and Sam Bobrick, and first aired on October 25, 1965.

View Details
Air date: Nov 1, 1965

Andy, Opie and Aunt Bee arrive in Hollywood, there to witness the filming of Andy's life story Sheriff Without a Gun. But upon paying their first visit to Belmont Studios, the Taylors are none too pleased with the liberties taken by the scriptwriter. Aunt Bee in particular is aghast to discover that her movie counterpart is a shapely young blonde! Featured in the cast are two sitcom favorites: Hayden Rorke (I Dream of Jeannie) as Considine, and Gavin McLeod (The Mary Tyler Moore Show) as Bender. First telecast November 1, 1965, "Taylors in Hollywood" was written by Bill Idelson and Sam Bobrick.

View Details
Air date: Nov 8, 1965

The Andy Griffith Show's three-episode "Hollywood arc" came to a close on November 8, 1965 with the episode titled "The Hollywood Party." Having arrived in Tinseltown to witness the filming of his life story, Andy ends up paying a visit to sexy starlet Darlene Mason (Ruta Lee). It's all quite innocent, of course-but try telling that to Helen when she sees a full-page newspaper picture of Andy and Darlene apparently sharing a tender moment. Sid Melton appears as Darlene's press agent Pat Michaels. "The Hollywood Party" was written by Fred Freeman and Lawrence J. Cohen.

View Details
Air date: Nov 15, 1965

Aunt Bee becomes quite the celebrity when she wins an abundance of prizes on the TV game show Win or Lose. As her fame grows, so does her ego-at least until the IRS shows up to burst her bubble. "Aunt Bee on TV" was filmed before the series' three-episode "Hollywood arc" ("Off to Hollywood", "Taylors in Hollywood" and "The Hollywood Party"), but telecast afterward, on November 15, 1965. The episode was written by Fred Freeman and Lawrence J. Cohen.

View Details
Show More Episodes

The Andy Griffith Show: Season 6 Photos

Tv Season Info

Critic Reviews for The Andy Griffith Show: Season 6

There are no critic reviews yet for Season 6. Keep checking Rotten Tomatoes for updates!

Audience Reviews for The Andy Griffith Show: Season 6

News & Features