The Sopranos: Season 2 (2000)

SEASON:

Season 2
The Sopranos

Critics Consensus

The Sopranos' strong cast and solid writing add depth to the show's occasionally unlikable characters and their repellent deeds, making for thought-provoking, consistently compelling viewing.

94%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 16

99%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 436

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Episodes

Air date: Jan 16, 2000

In the second-season premiere of this original HBO series, Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) adjusts to some changes in both his families in the wake of his mother's betrayal and a legal crackdown by federal law enforcement. Tony's also dealing with the sudden reappearance of his sister Janice (Aida Turturro), a free spirit going by the Hindu name "Parvati," who's really a greedy schemer in the finest Soprano tradition. Claiming she's there to care for their hospitalized mother Livia (Nancy Marchand), Janice is angling to get her mother's house (or the proceeds from its sales) when Livia dies. Tony refuses to see Livia, who's "dead" as far as he's concerned and not invited to a family barbecue. Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is in jail and Tony orders a hit on Philly, one of Junior's men, because Philly's blabbing about Tony's therapy. But Tony's psychotherapist Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), who's been reduced to hiding out and seeing patients in a motel room, refuses to treat her star patient despite his renewed panic attacks, telling him off at a diner. Nephew Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) expands into a new business venture involving a scam stock brokerage called Webistics. Meanwhile Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) reappears, claiming to have undergone rehab in Puerto Rico. "Guy Walks Into a Psychiatrist's Office" premiered January 16, 2000.

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Air date: Jan 23, 2000

New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) proves himself a cagey leader in this episode of the cable TV series. When Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) is released from jail under house arrest due to a heart condition, Tony meets with him at the office of Junior's doctor, which cannot be wire-tapped by the government due to doctor-patient confidentiality laws. Tony allows Junior to earn a token five percent of his income and retain the title of "boss." Tony's still the one in charge, however, as he proves when he negotiates an end to a labor strike in a surprising way profitable both for him and a black community activist. Although Junior is nursing a serious grudge against his nephew, it's Tony he turns to when he injures himself in a bathtub fall. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to worm her way back into the Soprano family by befriending her niece, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), who gets her driver's license, and buttering up her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand). Livia and Janice's new closeness is short-lived, however, because Tony's son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), innocently spills the beans about his father and Janice discussing a "DNR" order. During a trip to the doctor's office for a steroid injection to alleviate back pain, Soprano family soldier Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) is revealed to be working with FBI agent Skip Lipari (Louis Lombardi), but not everything Big P tells the federal agent is true, so who's playing who? "Do Not Resuscitate" first aired January 23, 2000.

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Air date: Jan 30, 2000

A lethal new character joins the Soprano family in this episode of the original cable series, directed by Lee Tamhori. Mob boss Anthony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a call from the police, but it's not his illegal activities they're concerned with; his daughter Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) has thrown a party at the unoccupied house of Tony's mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), and one of her teenage friends has overdosed on drugs. Tony and his wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), feel powerless to control their daughter, and give her only a token punishment, but Carmela is infuriated when Tony's sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), attempts to intervene with some unwanted child-rearing advice. Richie Aprile (David Proval), the hair-trigger-tempered brother of deceased boss Jackie Aprile, is released from prison after ten years, embittered over his loss of power. He pushes for the position and money he feels rightfully belong to him, but Tony urges Richie to be patient. Although he's indebted to Richie, pizza shop owner Beansie (Paul Herman) refuses to knuckle under and pay tribute, so Richie viciously runs over him in a parking lot, then backs up over Beansie again, crippling his one-time friend. Richie struggles with his inner demons at yoga class, where he runs into Janice, a former flame. Richie seeks to stoke the fires of romance with Janice again by visiting her and her mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), at the hospital. Tony's cold to Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) when they bump into each other at a restaurant, and Melfi is haunted by her cheery "Toodle-oo" to the powerful mob boss. "Toodle-Fucking-oo" originally aired January 30, 2000.

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Air date: Feb 6, 2000

This episode of the original cable TV series was shot on-location in Italy. New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) travels with his top lieutenants, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) and Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), to Naples, where he intends to negotiate a lucrative new deal for the car-jacking operation he's taken over from his Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). While Paulie attempts to ingratiate himself with the locals with little success, Christopher holes up in his hotel room with Tanno (Giuseppe Zeno), a new acquaintance, on a drug-addled bender that lasts the entire trip. Tony discovers that his distant relative Don Zi Vittorio (Vittorio Duse) has become senile, and that Zi's voluptuous, intelligent daughter, Annalisa (Sofia Milos), is the true boss. Tony is powerfully attracted to Annalisa, who reminds him of Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), but he has a difficult time negotiating business with a woman. They agree on a price for the stolen cars and Tony recruits one of Annalisa's most valuable men, Furio Giunta (Federico Castelluccio), to be his new enforcer. Back at home in the U.S., Angie Bompensiero (Toni Kalem) confesses to Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) that she's unhappy in her marriage to Pussy (Vincent Pastore) and wants out, but Carmela, already questioning her marriage to Tony, urges Angie to stick with her husband. Spotted by an old acquaintance while meeting with his FBI contact, Pussy is later forced to murder his friend with a hammer. "Commendatori" aired Feburary 6, 2000.

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Air date: Feb 13, 2000

In this episode of the popular cable TV series, mob chief Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) returns to therapy, a new lieutenant makes a powerful impression, and a legendary director tries his hand at acting in a multi-episode story arc. Tony reorganizes his crew, promoting Silvio Dante (Steve Van Zandt) and Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) to share an underboss role, while leaving Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore) at the same level as Christopher (Michael Imperioli) and Furio (Federico Castelluccio). This infuriates Pussy, who becomes less reluctant to share information with the FBI, while Furio, now working for Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) as a mozzarella maker, is ordered to lean on the owner of a whorehouse, whose delinquent payments are Christopher's responsibility. Christopher, however, is wrapped up in an acting class given to him as a gift by his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo). Tony, while he should be happy that he's not under indictment and business is booming, is having fits and tantrums. It's partly the stress of discovering that the renewed romance between his sister, Janice (Aida Turturro), and Richie Aprile (David Proval) is becoming serious, so Tony tries to talk with his counsel, Hesh Rabkin (Jerry Adler), who's of little help. Hesh does reveal, however, that Tony's father also suffered from blackouts. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) has been seeing a therapist of her own, Dr. Elliott Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich), to whom she reveals her guilt over refusing to treat Tony. Although Kupferberg advises against it, Melfi calls Tony to offer her services, which Tony at first gruffly refuses. Tony relents and appears for his appointment, re-starting his sessions in an effort to gain "total control." "Big Girls Don't Cry" first aired February 13, 2000.

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Air date: Feb 20, 2000

Frank Sinatra Jr. provides an amusing cameo as himself in this episode of the hit television series. Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) tells his therapist, Dr. Jennifer Melfi (Lorraine Bracco), of his anger at all the "happy wanderers" in the world, those without the cares and concerns he suffers. One responsibility that Tony's looking forward to, however, is control of the "executive game," a poker game for high rollers that he's now inherited from Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese). At a funeral, Tony is forced to deal with the presence of his estranged mother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), who's escorted by Janice (Aida Turturro) and her lover, Richie Aprile (David Proval). Janice is pressuring Richie to stand up to her brother and claim what's rightfully his -- namely, control of the mob family. Against his better judgement, Tony allows his old friend and local sporting goods store owner Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick) into the executive game, despite the fact that Davey's gambling problems have been causing trouble with Richie to the tune of eight grand. Davey loses another 45,000 dollars and tries to convince Soprano friend and restaurant owner Artie Bucco (John Ventimiglia) to loan him the cash to pay Tony and Richie, but Artie can't help. Junior reveals a family secret to Tony about a feeble-minded uncle he never knew he had, and Tony's daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), encounters a problem with her classmate Eric when his sport utility vehicle ends up in Soprano hands. "The Happy Wanderer" first aired on February 20, 2000.

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Air date: Feb 27, 2000

Movie stars Jon Favreau, Sandra Bernhard, and Janeane Garofalo make cameo appearances as themselves in this episode of the hit HBO series that finds a Mafia wiseguy flirting with Hollywood. Mob lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli), who abandoned the screenplay he was secretly writing, finds himself bitten by the show business bug once again when he meets the beautiful Amy (Alicia Witt), a development executive working on a new film with actor Jon Favreau. Christopher and Favreau meet, and the actor appropriates some of Christopher's real-life crime anecdotes for a script. Despite the fact that Amy is his cousin's girlfriend, Christopher sleeps with her. In the Soprano household, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler) is causing his parents grief with his new apathy. After flunking most of his classes, he gets into a car accident and explains to his parents, Tony (James Gandolfini) and Carmela (Edie Falco), that he's discovered Existentialsim, and that life is absurd and meaningless. A visit with his grandmother, Livia (Nancy Marchand), is no help, as her world view is even darker and more depressing. At his confirmation party, Anthony is caught smoking pot, so his sponsor Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), explains to Anthony that his father is a "stand-up guy," despite the fact that Big P is betraying Tony and is reluctantly wearing a wire so the Feds can record his conversations. Pussy ends up weeping in the bathroom while his FBI contact Skip (Louis Lombardi) listens in. Informed by a jealous Adriana (Drea de Matteo) that her boyfriend Christopher is dreaming of Hollywood again, Tony delivers an ultimatum to his lieutenant at the party, forcing him to choose between the movies the mob. "D-Girl" originally aired February 27, 2000.

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Air date: Mar 5, 2000

A violent turn of events threatens the good fortunes of the Soprano family in this episode of the cable television series. Concerned that her daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), could end up attending a college thousands of miles away, Carmela Soprano (Edie Falco) asks her neighbor, Jean Cusamano (Saundra Santiago), for a favor. It seems that Jean's twin sister, Joan (also played by Santiago), a successful lawyer, is a graduate of Georgetown University and serves in an influential alum position. Carmela asks if Joan would write a recommendation for Meadow, but Joan's answer is no. Determined and more than a little peeved, Carmela bakes a ricotta pie and shows up at Joan's office, making it clear that the recommendation is an offer Joan can't refuse. Carmela's husband, mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), is dealing with his own headache, his lieutenant Richie Aprile (David Proval), who is bucking his order to build a wheelchair access ramp at the home of pizzeria owner Beansie (Paul Herman), whom Richie is responsible for injuring. Richie caves in after a talk with Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) and even offers Tony his lucky leather jacket, a relic from the 1970s that Tony promptly gives to his maid's immigrant husband, enraging Richie. Deciding to quit taking drugs and give up his dreams of a life in the movie business, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) asks his girlfriend, Adriana (Drea de Matteo), to marry him. The couple's joy is short-lived, as Christopher's two partners in crime, Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.) and Sean Gismonte (Chris Tardio), decide to move up the mob ladder by murdering Christopher, gunning him down in a diner parking lot. Sean is killed in the attack, and Matt goes on the run after Richie refuses to help him. "Full Leather Jacket" originally aired March 5, 2000.

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Air date: Mar 12, 2000

Series co-star Michael Imperioli, who also wrote the feature film Summer of Sam (1999), penned the script for this episode of the popular pay-television drama. Shot several times in the previous episode, Soprano family lieutenant Christopher Moltisanti (Imperioli) clings to life in a hospital and has an out-of-body experience that brings him into contact with his ghosts of his late father and a slain former associate, Mikey Palmice, in the afterlife. Shaken up by Christopher's account of his supernatural journey, Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) visits a psychic, a priest, and even Palmice's widow, convinced he'll go to Hell when he dies. Mafia boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) receives a tip regarding the whereabouts of Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato Jr.), one of the gunmen who shot Christopher, and pays Matt a lethal visit with Big Pussy (Vincent Pastore), who's forced to commit murder despite being a federal informant. Hearing about the illegitimate child borne by another mobster's mistress, Carmela (Edie Falco) urges her husband Tony to get a vasectomy, as she's aware of his affair with a Russian girl, Irina (Oksana Babiy). Tony insists the affair is over, but Carmela is highly skeptical. Janice (Aida Turturro) continues to pressure her boyfriend, Richie Aprile (David Proval), to move against her brother Tony. Tony blows up at his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), and then tries to rectify the situation by spending time with him. Tony also attempts to be a good husband; he tells Carmela he'll get a vasectomy, but she tells Tony she's changed her mind and may want another child. Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco) confesses during a visit with her psychiatrist Dr. Kupferberg (Peter Bogdanovich) that she has made an unholy alliance with her notorious client and that she's becoming increasingly dependent upon alcohol and pills. "From Where to Eternity" first aired on March 12, 2000.

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Air date: Mar 19, 2000

A witness could bring an organized crime family crashing down in this episode of the HBO television series created by David Chase. Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) is distressed to learn that a witness has identified him as being in the area where a traitorous mob lieutenant was murdered. He visits his lawyer, Neil Mink (David Margulies), to discuss a strategy of stalling the feds, and delivers a bag of cash, Tony's rainy day fund for his wife and kids should he be arrested. Tony's also upset when his son, Anthony Jr. (Robert Iler), prefers to hang out with his friends at the mall rather than spend time with his dad, but Tony then promptly forgets his son's swim meet. After a meeting with Tony, Soprano family muscle Richie Aprile (David Proval) complains to Tony's Uncle Junior (Dominic Chianese) about the shoddy treatment they're both getting. Junior warns Richie about the treacherous Janice (Aida Turturro), who's letting Richie hold a gun to her head during sex. As payment for the massive gambling debt of his old pal, Davey Scatino (Robert Patrick), Tony and his crew take over Davey's outdoor store, running up the limit on all of Davey's lines of credit, intending to sell the merchandise on the street and bankrupt the business. A depressed Davey sleeps in a tent in his store, never returning home and contemplating suicide. Meanwhile, Pussy (Vincent Pastore) gives the FBI a list of investors in the Webistics scam and Tony's wife, Carmela (Edie Falco), has a crush on virile, widowed wallpaper hanger Vic Musto (Joe Penny), Davey's brother-in-law. Their flirtation threatens to become something more, but then Vic meets Davey for lunch and learns that Carmela's husband is a mob kingpin who has ruined Davey's family. Vic offers to pay for the college tuition of his nephew and breaks off his friendship with Carmela, sending an assistant to finish the wallpaper job. Tony learns that the witness against him learned of his identity and is now refusing to testify. The mob boss is so elated, he walks out of a therapy session with Dr. Melfi (Lorraine Bracco). His daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler), learns that she's been accepted at some top colleges, giving the family cause for celebration. "Bust-Out," which was called "Deus Ex Machina" until a last-minute title change, originally aired March 19, 2000.

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The Sopranos: Season 2 Photos

Tv Season Info

Series two of The Sopranos begins with Richie Aprile being released from prison. It is soon revealed that he's uncontrollable. A witness goes to the FBI and identifies Tony. This is regarding an assassination. After this fiasco, Tony attempts to find out who the informant is. Murder and betrayal are again recurring in this crime drama series.

Critic Reviews for The Sopranos Season 2

All Critics (16) | Top Critics (13)

Most of all, The Sopranos remains a showcase for ferociously distinctive writing, inventive direction and brilliant portrayals of surprisingly, even disturbingly, sympathetic multilayered characters.

Jan 30, 2018 | Rating: 4/4 | Full Review…

The Sopranos is a show for viewers who want an alternative to TV dramas that too often ask us to accept oversimplification and feel-good-ism.

Jul 8, 2014 | Full Review…

The Sopranos remains a showcase for ferociously distinctive writing, inventive direction and brilliant portrayals of surprisingly, even disturbingly, sympathetic multilayered characters by a perfectly cast group of actors who hold back nothing.

Jul 8, 2014 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

It isn't clear why the series generates such effusive praise. The greatest TV show? No way. Tony's too despicable.

Jul 8, 2014 | Full Review…

The second season of The Sopranos begins on a less frothy, slightly more bitter note than the first, but the terrific midlife-crisis mob show continues to generate a buzz.

Jul 8, 2014 | Full Review…

The Sopranos is ferociously funny and, of course, vice versa. Excessive ferocity is itself funny.

Feb 25, 2020 | Full Review…

As The Sopranos heads into season No. 2, writing remains crisp, photography is sharp and interesting, new characters lend intriguing plot twists and James Gandolfini continues to expertly play the most compelling character on series television.

Aug 18, 2014 | Full Review…
Top Critic

I was pleased to see that the first two episodes were better than I had remembered.

Jul 15, 2014 | Rating: A | Full Review…

It keeps pulling you back in - back in on yourself, appealing to your basest instincts, to your fundamental urge to hear a bloody story well told.

Jul 8, 2014 | Rating: A | Full Review…

A look at a mistifing figure of a gangster in the contemporary times. A necessary look to ourselves. [full review in Spanish]

Nov 26, 2019 | Rating: 5/5 | Full Review…

Plenty of sex, violence, domestic melodrama and comic irony; a portrait of a suburban landscape that does for northern New Jersey what film noir did for Los Angeles.

Apr 19, 2018 | Full Review…

Bottom Line: Still TV's top "family" drama

Jul 8, 2014 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Sopranos: Season 2

  • Sep 09, 2015
    Season 2 continued the good streak season 1 has set up and continued to be more thought provoking.
    Sylvester K Super Reviewer
  • May 09, 2015
    Though not as solid as the first season, thanks to some aimless plot lines and some repetition, season 2 is still incredible on its writing and for leaving us constantly confused on who we're supposed to root for. We're never sure if we should applaud any of these guys for what they do, but their humanity keeps us engaged right until the end.
    Francisco G Super Reviewer
  • Apr 13, 2020
    Keeping up the good work
  • Sep 04, 2019
    Pitch perfect from start to finish.
  • Jan 25, 2019
    Gripping mob drama. Dark with some funny moments. You get very interested in the characters and their lives.
  • Jan 15, 2019
    The best TV show ever. I do not think we will ever see anything like it again. This is my favorite season
  • May 05, 2017
    Sigue la expectacion para saber que pasara con la familia, con el tio Junior, con la posesiva madr,e, con la loca hermana y con todo lo demas.
  • Aug 06, 2016
    The only thing good I can say about The Sopranos is how good James Gandolfini plays Tony. That is all I can say. No more. No less.
  • Jul 06, 2015
    Tony: "I had a dream I f**ked your brains out. Right on that desk, and you loved it". Dr. Melfi: "Well, you threw that at me like a rock". Well it's been quite a while since my last review of The Sopranos, I mean I reviewed the first season back in March and as I'm specking it's July now. So a good four mouths has passed and I finally finished season two of The Sopranos and the reason why it took me this long to finish is very simply and that's me watching or checking out new or old movies and then reviewing them, same thing with TV shows and back in April I went to New Zealand for two weeks and when I got back I kind of forgot about The Sopranos and I haven't even finished the season yet. Until now I watched all the five last episodes and finished the second season and I got to say that this season was pretty fantastic just like the first season. I'm running out of things to say about the amazing James Gandolfini, because once again James made Tony both enjoyable to watch and likable in some way even when he's the anti-hero of the show. Tony as a character dose do bad things and usually with a character like that I would hate them because I normally can't stand people like that, but Tony is something like I can understand him and why he's the way he is, all that is James Gandolfini as I bet he felt the same way and played the character anyway. James was brilliant in this season and when I watch season 3 I bet he's still going to be fantastic as always. What I never brought up in my season one review is the intro for the show and how it really sets up the character of Tony Soprano. It's jazzy, it's sharp and it's remember-able like Tony. Everyone dose a great in this season when it comes to acting and they characters. I didn't really spot or remember anyone doing a bad performance. Now one of the cast member of the show had sadly passed away and that's Nancy Marchand as Tony's mother. Nancy plays Tony's mother and that character can be best describe as Skyler White from Breaking Bad that's how horrible and just the worse piece of sh*t of a character that Tony's mother is and I got to give credit to the actress for making me hate her as a character in the show. This is sadly her final episode and not a great way to go out if I must say as in this episode her character is stuck in the airport as the police there as taken her in for questioning and I'm keeping this spoiler free so if you want to know why then check out the episode, but anywhere she get's on the phone to call Tony to get him to save her but Tony hangs up the phone as he hated her for what she did to him and the very last shot we get from her is calling out to Tony to save her. For problems with the season I haven't really got any to be honest. Overall the second season of The Sopranos was just as great as the first season. The acting, the characters and everything else was excellent.
  • Jun 17, 2015
    Honestly one of the best seasons of a tv show that I've ever seen.

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