The X-Files: Season 6 (1998 - 1999)

SEASON:

Season 6
The X-Files

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83%

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Critic Ratings: 6

94%

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User Ratings: 153

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Episodes

Air date: Nov 8, 1998

Those unlucky X-Files fans who hadn't seen the 1998 theatrical-feature version of the popular Fox Network series were undoubtedly confused by the numerous references to that film in the series' sixth-season opener, "The Beginning." Written by series creator Chris Carter, this episode was also a follow-up to the fifth-season closer "The End," with Mulder standing before an FBI review panel, valiantly attempting to justify reopening the X-Files. The problem here is an old one: without concrete proof of alien existence, all findings of Mulder's past investigations are pointless. This time, however, the proof may be out there, either in the form of Scully's mysterious illness or the repeated attacks from a sharp-clawed alien life form -- the existence of which even the agents' old nemesis, the Cigarette Smoking Man (William B. Davis), cannot deny. "The Beginning" first aired November 8, 1998.

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Air date: Nov 15, 1998

Still on probation, Agent Mulder investigates an X-File case without official sanction. As a result, he finds himself the hostage of a seemingly insane carjacker named Patrick Crump (Bryan Cranston), who insists that his wife was killed by an "inner-ear explosion." It soon becomes clear that Mulder's captor is suffering from a bizarre illness, which may also claim the helpless FBI agent as well -- and what about Scully? Written by Vince Gilligan, "Drive" was originally telecast November 15, 1998.

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Air date: Nov 22, 1998

Shipwrecked in the Bermuda Triangle, Mulder finds himself onboard a British luxury liner that has seemingly been frozen in time in the year 1939. He is also swept up in a power struggle between the ship's crew and a band of Nazis who want to get their hands on a prototypical atom bomb. Somewhat reluctantly coming to Mulder's aid is a "mystery woman" who is a dead ringer for Agent Scully. Filmed in letterboxed format (for future HDTV use) and employing complex filming elements like real-time, continous takes and split-screens, "Triangle" originally aired November 22, 1998, and was written and directed by X-Files creator Chris Carter.

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Air date: Nov 29, 1998

Written by Vince Gilligan, John Shiban, and Frank Spotnitz, "Dreamland" was part one of a landmark two-part X-Files episode. At long last, Mulder and Scully gain access to the fabled Area 51, the mecca of UFO enthusiasts the world over. There, the two agents bear witness to a mysterious, low-flying aircraft. When the vessel passes, Mulder finds that he has literally traded places with Area 51 official Morris Fletcher (Michael McKean). "Dreamland" first aired November 29, 1998.

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Air date: Nov 29, 1998

In part one of the two-part X-Files drama "Dreamland," Mulder and Scully's visit to the legendary Area 51 resulted in a freakish personality transference, with Mulder literally changing places with "Man in Black" Morris Fletcher (Michael McKean). Unaware of the switch, Scully -- who is down in the dumps after being placed on suspension -- accepts "Mulder's" invitation to a home-cooked meal, and is in for the first in a long line of surprises. Meanwhile, "Fletcher" is stuck in the Area 51 brig, unable to convince anyone that, despite all appearances, he's not Fletcher -- and that things had better be returned to normal before something cataclysmic happens. Written by Vince Gilligan, John Shiban, and Frank Spotnitz, "Dreamland II" was originally broadcast December 8, 1998.

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Air date: Dec 13, 1998

On Christmas Eve, Mulder persuades Scully to investigate an allegedly haunted house. The spooky old domicile had been the scene of a double murder way back in 1918. Upon their arrival, the agents must contend with a taciturn married couple (Ed Asner, Lily Tomlin), who are obviously harboring a horrible secret -- and whose presence bodes ill for the future of the two people we really care about. First broadcast December 13, 1998, "How the Ghosts Stole Christmas" was written and directed by X-Files creator Chris Carter.

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Air date: Jan 3, 1999

A disturbing ultrasound leads mother-to-be Laura Weinsider (Lisa Jane Persky) to experience a strange and demonic dream. Upon awakening, Laura finds that she is no longer pregnant -- but she is drenched in blood. Accused of killing her unborn child, Laura comes under the scrutiny of Mulder and Scully, who believe that forces far more sinister have shifted into gear. Written by David Amann, "Terms of Endearment" was first telecast January 3, 1999.

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Air date: Jan 10, 1999

There's a very good reason that the small town of Kroner, KS, is known as "ground zero for extreme weather." When Mulder and Scully arrive in Kroner, the village is in the third month of a devastating drought. The locals suspect that the drought is the handiwork of Daryl Mootz (Clayton Rohner), a self-styled rainmaker who is accused of going to horrible extremes to drum up business and push up his asking price. Originally broadcast January 10, 1999, "The Rain King" was written by Jeffrey Bell.

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Air date: Jan 17, 1999

Evidently inspired by the film noir classic D.O.A., the January 17, 1999, X-Files episode "S.R. 819" finds Assistant Director Skinner (Mitch Pileggi) racing against time to solve a murder -- his own. While working out in a gym, Skinner is somehow infected with a freakish blood disease. Investigating, Mulder and Scully unearth a conspiracy involving a world health bill called Senate Resolution 819. Written by John Shiban, "S.R. 819" also brought a familiar X-Files villain back into the fold.

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Air date: Jan 24, 1999

Accompanied by new partner Peyton Ritter (Richard Ruccolo), Scully investigates the incredibly good luck of crime-scene photographer Alfred Fellig (Geoffrey Lewis). No matter where a murder has occurred, Fellig is always the first man on the scene, forever out-scooping his competition. Scully suspects that Fellig may well be drumming up his own business by killing his "models." Written by Vince Gilligan, "Tithonus" -- a designation which, like many other X-Files episode titles, makes sense only in context -- first aired January 24, 1999.

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The X-Files: Season 6 Photos

Tv Season Info

Season six of The X-Files starts with Fox Mulder and Dana Scully being told that they have been denied reassignment to the division and that Walter Skinner and Diana Fowley have been assigned to the X-Files instead. Mulder and Scully respond by going to track down an escaped alien in Phoenix, against FBI orders. This season includes a potential alien virus, Mulder gaining telepathic abilities, and an alien-human hybrid that will trigger colonization if the aliens learn of her existence. Stars David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson.

News & Interviews for The X-Files: Season 6

Critic Reviews for The X-Files Season 6

All Critics (6) | Top Critics (2)

It's clear a lot of love was poured into this one, effectively a love letter to those who worship at the altar of the show.

Oct 14, 2017 | Full Review…

The Alien Rebels kill the entire Syndicate, so you'd think the government conspiracy is over, and we don't have to worry about alien colonization anymore. You'd be wrong. The mythology manages to somehow drag on for three more seasons.

Oct 14, 2017 | Full Review…

This was a series still alive with all of the possibilities of being a big, hit television show. It was, in other words, a show playing offense, not a show trying to hang onto its audience for dear life.

Jan 5, 2015 | Rating: A | Full Review…

[Adds] coloring, texture and confirmation of long-held suspicions. As a result of the events in these episodes, The X-Files will have to head in some new directions... viewers will certainly know almost all they need to know about the conspiracy.

May 2, 2019 | Full Review…

"Drive" in turn becomes a memorably scary X-Files episode - not for any particular monster or alien presence, but because of the perhaps most frightening element of the show's world ever: mankind itself.

Nov 21, 2017 | Full Review…

I'm glad they wrapped this storyline up before it got any more mystifying but it's also way too open-ended to be satisfying.

Sep 27, 2017 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The X-Files: Season 6

  • Feb 02, 2019
    After moving production to LA and making the leap to feature films, The X-Files starts anew in Season 6. Picking up a few months after the X-Files was shut down, Mulder and Scully are stuck doing run-of-the-mill FBI work (yet still manage to run across the paranormal); but everything changes when an Alien Resistance suddenly appears and attacks the Syndicate. Season 6 begins the slow downfall of the series. The separation of the characters continues as many of the episodes find Mulder and Scully each on their own individual adventures. And the tone has a distinct shift to the farcical, with episodes like "Dreamland" and "The Rain King." Also, the Alien Conspiracy seems to come to a sudden, abrupt end, leaving the series without a clear over-arcing plot. Still, the series mythology takes some exciting twists and turns, and there are a few interesting cases-of-the-week involving time-loops, ghosts, and high-tech weapons. A pretty big letdown after last season, Season 6 of The X-Files is one of the show's weakest.
    Dann M Super Reviewer
  • Sep 30, 2020
    In the first post-movie season, the new L.A. setting lacks the same ambience, however faithfully the crew tries to replicate it, that Vancouver had, episodes can be a bit too dependent on comedy and as for the mythology episodes...they aren't awful but you can tell this was the point where it came to light that Chris Carter had no real epic plan. Fortunately, beyond the obvious merit of the dynamic between Mulder and Scully, the sixth season of The X-Files definitely has enough good episodes to outweigh the more underwhelming ones that stand out in their own different ways. The "Speed" episode, without which Breaking Bad wouldn't exist in the way we know it today. The episode with Bruce Campbell who delivers a terrific performance that could've lead to him playing John Doggett. And of course, "Triangle", full of excellent camerawork and seamless editing to give off the impression all four segments are one long take each. The penultimate episode was pretty effective too. Attempts to change the status quo felt somewhat pointless since 12 episodes later, Mulder & Scully are back working on them without fear of repercussions as if the last couple of episodes didn't happen. Especially since anybody who only watches the MOTW episodes will be confused by why "Skinner" is black now. As well as the fact that the first episode relies on you having seen the movie to understand just what the hell everybody's on about. The sixth season marked the point where the show wasn't going to be earning the same level of acclaim the first five seasons but there was still enough competence from Chris Carter and co. to make the first non-Vancouver season a pretty enjoyable new beginning.
  • Feb 29, 2020
    This is not just the Best season of X-files but the Shows peak in terms of overall quality.
  • Jun 17, 2019
    Continuously interesting, funny, and exciting.
  • Mar 11, 2019
    This is one of the best shows of all history. Cannot recommend it enough!
  • Mar 09, 2018
    Save a few episodes, i found this season a sore disappointment. part of its problem is the sunny skies of hollywood (fog machines instead of fog, dry instead of damp, warm summer days instead of cool autumn and winter), but some of the stories are downright ridiculous. the show is admittedly sci-fi / Fantasy, but episodes like "dreamland", "triangle", or "monday" are pure comic fantasy and devalue the entire show. though the quality remains high, there are few episodes I would recommend other than perhaps "arcadia" or "alpha" the mythology from the first film (fight the future) is ostensibly ended.
  • Dec 30, 2017
    With relocation to LA the tone of the X-FILES is lost forever. They really should have quit on a high after the last season and the following success of the movie. This season is prime time television X-Files. Although there are some good stand alone episodes most of it falls flat. Duchovny and the writers are trying too much comedy and the general mood is lightweight. The conspiracy is slightly explained and revealed but is a major disappointment. The reasons behind it don't add up but really it was just a way for them to hit the reset button and reboot the series. Hugely disappointing for fans. This season would mark the decline of the X-FILES. I stopped watching the X-FILES after this season along with many others when it was on TV. There are some enjoyable episodes along the way and this would be the last season where Duchovny turned up, after this he just phoned it in. Gillian Anderson looks bored.
  • Sep 18, 2017
    This is TV at its best and the greatest work done by the X-files team! This season adds some humor and very creative story lines. Love it!!!
  • Feb 28, 2017
    Starting with the sweeping landscape shot of Los Angeles, the show's new home after filming five seasons in Vancouver, Canada, the Sixth Season of the X-Files epitomized the concept of change in nearly every aspect. Coming on the heels of "Fight The Future", the writers & producers were "flying by the seat of their pants" for the first time. Chris Carter always had a five-year plan for the show (he wanted to spin it off into a series of movies), but FOX likely made it too lucrative for him to walk away. As a result, this Sixth Season (especially at the very beginning) had a serious change of tone that almost rendered a different (if not altogether bad) show for quite some time. In regards to the mythology episodes, the season starts with the aptly-titled "The Beginning", in which the "new mythology" plotline is begun, centering on the notion that perhaps mankind is itself extraterrestrial in origin. After a two-part episode ("Two Fathers" and "One Son") that wraps up the original Syndicate mythology by explaining the ultimate fate of the alien-human hybrid program, the finale ("Biogenesis") again returns to the "humans as aliens" plot, where Agent Scully makes the greatest scientific discovery in human history on the African coast. I like how they tied up the Syndicate angle this season, and I was fascinated by the "we are actually part alien" idea (I just wish Season Seven would have done something interesting with it). Also during this season, the stand-alone episodes were of much more comedic nature, as well as focusing on the Mulder-Scully relationship more than ever. The stand-alones that really shine are "How The Ghosts Stole Christmas" (a merry romp through a haunted house), "Triangle" (a fantastic nod to the Wizard of Oz), "The Unnatural" (Mulder's love of the National Pastime is explored), and "Field Trip" (one of the best episodes, concept-wise, of the entire show). Also, "Dreamland 1 & 2" is a unique two-parter that showcases the humor, fantastical plots, and relationships of the show all at once! This season will always have special meaning to me, as it was the season I began watching live episodes. As a rookie coming into the show, the comedy and wacky plots featured in show were just "what the show was" to me, and thus I was able to appreciate them fully. After a few re-watches, though, I am always jarred by the sudden change of tone (from serious to comic) and the intense focus on the Mulder/Scully "shippers" (something Chris Carter once said he never wanted to do). The episodes aren't bad, per se, just so different than anything preceding them. Overall, I was impressed by the mythology episodes this season and intrigued by the inventive concepts of the standalones. While no longer my favorite season of the show, my nostalgia helps me to appreciate the wackier antics a bit more than most.

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