Barry Nelson

Barry Nelson

Highest Rated: 84% The Shining (1980)

Lowest Rated: 67% A Guy Named Joe (1944)

Birthday: Apr 16, 1917

Birthplace: Not Available

Of Scandinavian stock, Barry Nelson was no sooner graduated from the University of California-Berkeley than he was signed to an MGM contract. Most of his MGM feature-film assignments were supporting roles, though he was given leads in the 1942 "B" A Yank in Burma and the 1947 "Crime Does Not Pay" short The Luckiest Guy in the World. While serving in the Army, Nelson made his Broadway debut in the morale-boosting Moss Hart play Winged Victory, repeating his role (and his billing of Corporal Barry Nelson) in the 1944 film version. Full stardom came Nelson's way in such Broadway productions of the 1950s and 1960s as The Rat Race, The Moon is Blue and Cactus Flower. He repeated his Broadway role in the 1963 film version of Mary Mary, and both directed and acted in Frank Gilroy's two-character play The Only Game in Town (1968). Nelson starred in a trio of 1950s TV series: the 1952 espionager The Hunter, the 1953 sitcom My Favorite Husband, and the unjustly neglected Canadian-filmed 1958 adventure series Hudson's Bay (1959). Oh, and did you know that Nelson was the first actor ever to play Ian Fleming's secret agent James Bond on television? Yep: Barry Nelson portrayed American spy Jimmy Bond on a 1954 TV adaptation of Fleming's Casino Royale. Nelson died of unspecified causes on April 7, 2007, while traveling through Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He was 84.

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Credit
84% The Shining Ullman 1980
No Score Yet The Night of the Claw Actor 1980
No Score Yet Joseph and His Brothers Actor 1979
80% Pete 'n' Tillie Burt 1972
73% Airport Lt. Anson Harris 1970
No Score Yet Mary, Mary Bob McKellaway 1963
No Score Yet The First Traveling Saleslady Charles Masters 1956
No Score Yet The Man with My Face Chick Graham 1951
No Score Yet Tenth Avenue Angel Al Parker 1948
No Score Yet Command Decision Voice over loudspeaker 1948
No Score Yet Undercover Maisie Lt. Paul Scott 1947
67% A Guy Named Joe Dick Rumney 1944
No Score Yet Bataan F.X. Matowski 1943
80% The Human Comedy Pat 1943
No Score Yet Eyes in the Night Busch 1942
No Score Yet Dr. Kildare's Victory Sam Z. Cutler 1942
No Score Yet Rio Rita Harry Gantley 1942
No Score Yet Johnny Eager Rankin 1942
83% Shadow of the Thin Man Paul Clarke 1941

TV

Credit
No Score Yet Murder, She Wrote
1984-1996
Eugene McLendon 1988
No Score Yet Magnum, P.I.
1980-1988
William B. Knox 1982
No Score Yet Taxi
1978-1983
Dr. Jeffries 1981
No Score Yet Dallas
1978-1991
Arthur Elrod 1981
1979
33% Battlestar Galactica
1978-1980
Bogan 1978
82% The Twilight Zone
1959-1964
Bob Frazier 1964
No Score Yet The Alfred Hitchcock Hour
1962-1965
Colin 1964
1963
No Score Yet Alfred Hitchcock Presents
1955-1962
Hewson 1959

QUOTES FROM Barry Nelson CHARACTERS

Ullman says: I don't suppose they told you anything in Denver about the tragedy we had in the Winter of nineteen seventy.

Jack Torrance says: I don't believe they did.

Ullman says: My predecessor in this job left a man named Charles Grady as the Winter caretaker. And he came up here with his wife and two little girls, I think were eight and ten. And he had a good employment record, good references, and from what I've been told he seemed like a completely normal individual. But at some point during the winter, he must have suffered some kind of a complete mental breakdown. He ran a muck and killed his family with an axe. Stacked them neatly in one of the rooms in the West wing and then he, he put both barrels of a shot gun in his mouth.

Ullman says: Four presidents, movie stars...

Wendy Torrance says: Royalty?

Ullman says: All the best people.

Ullman says: I don't suppose they told you anything in Denver about the tragedy we had in the winter of nineteen seventy.

Jack Torrance says: I don't believe they did.

Ullman says: My predecessor in this job left a man named Charles Grady as the winter caretaker. And he came up here with his wife and two little girls, I think were eight and ten. And he had a good employment record, good references, and from what I've been told he seemed like a completely normal individual. But at some point during the winter, he must have suffered some kind of a complete mental breakdown. He ran amuck and killed his family with an axe; stacked them neatly in one of the rooms in the West wing and then he, he put both barrels of a shot gun in his mouth.

Jack Torrance says: Well, that is quite a story.

Ullman says: Yeah it is. It's still hard for me to believe it happened here. It did, and I think you can appreciate why I wanted to tell you about it.

Jack Torrance says: I certainly can and I also understand why your people in Denver left it for you to tell me.

Ullman says: Well obviously some people can be put off by staying alone in a place where something like that actually happened.

Jack Torrance says: Well you can rest assured Mr. Ullman, that's not going to happen with me. And as far as my wife is concerned...I'm sure she'll be absolutely fascinated when I tell her. She's a confirmed ghost story...and horror film addict.

Jack Torrance says: Well you can rest assured Mr. Ullman, that's not going to happen with me. And as far as my wife is concerned, I'm sure she'll be absolutely fascinated when I tell her. She's a confirmed ghost story, and horror film addict.