Roman Polanski

Roman Polanski

Highest Rated: 100% Knife in the Water (1962)

Lowest Rated: 17% Diary of Forbidden Dreams (1973)

Birthday: Aug 18, 1933

Birthplace: Paris, France

A Best Director Oscar winner for "The Pianist" (2002), Roman Polanski also made the seminal films "Rosemary's Baby" (1969) and "Chinatown" (1974), but his career was inevitably overshadowed by the shocking murder of second wife Sharon Tate and his statutory rape of a 13-year-old girl which resulted in him becoming one of America's most high-profile fugitives. Born in Paris, France in 1933 to Polish immigrant parents who moved back to Krakow shortly after, Roman Polanski endured a traumatic early childhood which was largely spent in the Krakow Ghetto following the outbreak of World War II, a period in which his mother was tragically killed at Auschwitz. Using cinema as a form of escapism, Polanski developed a passion for movies and in his late teens attended Lodz's National Film School. He achieved his first screen credit as an actor, in Andrzej Walda's "Pokolenie" (1954), before making his directorial debut with the semi-autobiographical "Rower" (1955). Following several further shorts, Polanski made the leap to feature films with the unsettling Oscar-nominated thriller "Knife in the Water" (1962) before helming psychological horror "Repulsion" (1965), tragicomedy "Cul-de-sac" (1966) and parody "The Fearless Vampire Killers" (1967). He then ventured into Hollywood for the first time with the acclaimed Satanic horror "Rosemary's Baby" (1968). But tragedy struck a year later when his second wife, Sharon Tate, was brutally murdered at their Los Angeles home alongside four friends by members of the notorious Manson Family. Polanski subsequently threw himself into his work, directing a provocative adaptation of "Macbeth" (1971) and absurdist comedy "What?" (1973) before becoming the toast of Tinseltown with "Chinatown" (1974), the neo-noir mystery based on the California Water Wars, which earned 11 Academy Award nominations. But after helming and starring as a Polish immigrant in Parisian tale "The Tenant" (1976), his story took an even darker turn two years later when he was charged with the rape of a 13-year-old girl in Los Angeles. Polanski later pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of unlawful sex with a minor, but on learning that a lengthy prison sentence was imminent, he fled America, spending the rest of his life in European exile. Yet Polanski continued to make films, and continued to receive the adoration of critics, with his next film, "Tess" (1979), picking up three Oscars and a Best Picture nomination. He fared less well with the swashbuckling epic "Pirates" (1986), but soon bounced back with "Frantic" (1988), a Hitchcock-esque thriller starring his future third wife Emmanuelle Seigner. After adding to his filmography with acting credits in in "Back in the USSR" (1992), "Una pura formulita" (1994) and "Zemsta" (2002), and directorial efforts "Bitter Moon" (1992), "Death and the Maiden" (1994) and "The Ninth Gate" (1999), Polanski adapted Polish-Jewish musician Wladyslaw Szpilman's autobiography in "The Pianist" (2003), winning both the Palme d'Or and Best Director Oscar in the process. He then took on Charles Dickens for "Oliver Twist" (2005) and Robert Harris for "The Ghost Writer" (2010), directed adaptations of stage plays "Carnage" (2011) and "Venus in Fur" (2013), and tackled the Dreyfus Affair in "J'accuse" (2019).

Photos

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Credit
77% 82% The Dreyfus Affair Director - 2019
46% 33% Based on a True Story Director,
Writer
- 2017
88% 71% Venus in Fur Director,
Screenwriter,
Producer
$342.2K 2013
84% 63% Seduced and Abandoned Himself (Character) - 2013
No Score Yet 73% Dance of the Vampires Director - 2011
91% 76% Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir Himself (Character) - 2011
70% 66% Carnage Director,
Screenwriter
$2.5M 2011
84% 70% The Ghost Writer Director,
Screenwriter,
Producer
$15.5M 2010
18% 63% Rush Hour 3 Det. Revi (Character) $140.1M 2007
61% 63% Oliver Twist Director,
Producer
$2M 2005
95% 96% The Pianist Director,
Producer
$32.5M 2002
No Score Yet 46% The Revenge Józef Papkin (Character) - 2002
43% 57% The Ninth Gate Director,
Writer (Screenplay),
Producer
$18.7M 1999
82% 81% Death and the Maiden Director $3.1M 1994
80% 88% A Pure Formality Inspector (Character) - 1994
50% 61% Dead Tired Himself (Character) $32.9K 1994
65% 81% Bitter Moon Director,
Writer (Screenplay),
Producer
$1.8M 1992
No Score Yet 25% Back in the USSR Kurilov (Character) - 1992
76% 64% Frantic Director,
Screenwriter
$17.5M 1988
30% 52% Pirates Director $1.6M 1986
81% 78% Tess Director,
Writer (Screenplay)
- 1979
88% 87% The Tenant Trelkovsky (Character),
Director,
Screenwriter
$9.6K 1976
69% 62% Blood for Dracula Man in Tavern (Character) - 1974
99% 93% Chinatown Man with knife (Character),
Director,
Writer
- 1974
17% 50% Diary of Forbidden Dreams Director,
Writer
- 1973
73% 75% Weekend of a Champion Unknown (Character),
Producer
- 1972
86% 73% Macbeth Director,
Screenwriter,
Producer
- 1971
No Score Yet No Score Yet A Day at the Beach Writer,
Producer
- 1970
No Score Yet No Score Yet Ciao Federico! Fellini Directs Satyricon Unknown (Character) - 1969
96% 87% Rosemary's Baby Director,
Screenwriter
- 1968
No Score Yet 60% The World's Most Beautiful Swindlers Director - 1967
69% 76% The Fearless Vampire Killers or: Pardon Me, but Your Teeth Are in My Neck Alfred, Abronsius' Assistant (Character),
Director,
Writer (Story and Screenplay)
- 1967
83% 79% Cul-de-Sac Director,
Writer
- 1966
95% 86% Repulsion Spoon Player (uncredited) (Character),
Director,
Writer (Original Screenplay)
- 1965
100% 85% Knife in the Water Director,
Writer
- 1962
No Score Yet 91% Innocent Sorcerers Dudzio (Character) - 1960
No Score Yet 74% Two Men and a Wardrobe Unknown (Character),
Director
- 1958

QUOTES FROM Roman Polanski CHARACTERS

Man With Knife says: You're a nosy fella, kitty cat, huh? You know what happens to nosy fellas? Huh? No? Wanna guess? Huh? No? Okay. They lose their noses.

Trelkovsky says: I think I'm pregnant

Trelkovsky says: At what precise moment does an individual stop being who he thinks he is? Cut off my arm. I say, "Me and my arm." You cut off my other arm. I say, "Me and my two arms." You take out my stomach, my kidneys, assuming that were possible... And I say, "Me and my intestines." And now, if you cut off my head... would I say, "Me and my head" or "Me and my body"? What right has my head to call itself me? What right?

Trelkovsky says: At what precise moment does an individual stop being who he thinks he is? Cut off my arm. I say, 'Me and my arm.' You cut off my other arm. I say, 'Me and my two arms.' You take out my stomach, my kidneys, assuming that were possible... And I say, 'Me and my intestines.' And now, if you cut off my head... would I say, 'Me and my head' or 'Me and my body'? What right has my head to call itself me? What right?