Cate Young

Cate Young
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
Cate Young is a freelance writer and pop culture critic in Trinidad and Tobago who writes about film, television, music, and critical commentary on media representation. Her work deals particularly with the intersection of race, gender and sexuality, and introducing an intersectional analysis to discussions of pop culture. Her writing has appeared in Cosmopolitan, Jezebel, NYLON, Bitch Magazine, and Vulture among others. Cate has a B.A. in Photojournalism from Boston University and a Masters in Mass Communications from the University of Leicester. In 2016, she served as the inaugural Pop Culture Criticism Fellow for Bitch Media, and in 2018, she was invited to attend and cover TIFF as an emerging voice in film criticism as part of the festival's effort to spotlight critics from underrepresented backgrounds through their Share Her Journey venture. She was also accepted to participate in the 7th annual NYFF Critics' Academy that same year.

movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year Review
91% Widows (2018) There's nothing here that won't make you glad you came. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2018
84% Creed II (2018) But despite its own individual merits, this year's sequel, Creed II, fails to quite live up to the potential of its predecessor, and Coogler himself seems to be the essential missing ingredient. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 6, 2018
79% Green Book (2018) With its insistence on the pretense of loving our way into racial harmony, the movie exists almost exclusively to allow white moviegoers to nod sagely about how far we've come. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2018
73% Assassination Nation (2018) Witches are making a pop culture comeback, so it's not a surprise that Sam Levinson's Assassination Nation trades on that rudimentary metaphor as a starting point for this horror-comedy cum political manifesto. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2018
60% Vox Lux (2018) Vox Lux serves as a fitting, if clumsy, acknowledgement of the new status quo. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2018
43% Where Hands Touch (2018) While expertly made, the film fails because it refuses to meaningfully acknowledge the basic truth of the terrifying power dynamics between the two lovers. - The Muse/Jezebel EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2018