Michael Koresky Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Michael Koresky

Michael Koresky
Michael Koresky's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Film Comment Magazine, Stop Smiling

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
69% On Chesil Beach (2018) Unfortunately, the film sends the fragile characters on a far more traditional arc than does the book, culminating in a sentimental, "present-day" climax complete with tear-stained old-age latex makeup. ‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted May 3, 2018
71% Double Lover (L'amant double) (2018) The kinky pleasures here often verge on the goofy (a fantasy sequence in which Renier makes out with himself is achievable with some functionally untitillating CGI), and the only real fetishes-twins, couches, mirrors-are purely cinematic ones.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Jan 3, 2018
77% Last Flag Flying (2017) The film follows a familiar template, but the wounds it traces are undeniable. ‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2017
96% Mudbound (2017) Despite the infrastructure set in motion centuries ago to keep only whites in positions of power, Mudbound elegantly depicts how such ingrained racism only serves to aid whites in digging our own graves.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
96% The Florida Project (2017) The general preciousness of The Florida Project serves to mask, or at least distract from, the emotional toll living in such dire straits has on the people in the motel. This is a structural choice.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
69% mother! (2017) This is strenuous, kamikaze filmmaking, and at least for two hours Aronofsky persuades that its ends are eternally urgent enough to justify the hyperbolic means. ‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2017
67% Wonderstruck (2017) A thoroughly self-aware object, full of unexpected marvels one might not consider for eternal display, Todd Haynes's Wonderstruck, is a thoroughly self-aware object, full of unexpected marvels, and which takes both museums and film itself as its subjects.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
91% A Ghost Story (2017) Self-consciously spare and reaching for a grandeur possibly too far beyond its frame, A Ghost Story is nevertheless a film of mesmerizing visual ideas and conceptual integrity. ‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
85% Beach Rats (2017) Hittman, a Flatbush native, is preternaturally skilled at immersing herself in the interior world and exterior details of sexually driven, beautifully confused teenagers in Brooklyn neighborhoods that function with their own enclosed ecosystems. ‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
97% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) If these early passages feel uncommonly unmoored for Kore-eda, it's because he's at his best in moments of togetherness.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Mar 7, 2017
98% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) Peck's film reminds us that even though he is no longer with us, he's still talking to us about what's going on.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2017
64% I Am Michael (2017) The film is careful not to judge its protagonist's spiritual journey, but the delicately pointed direction of the final phone call between Michael and Bennett-Franco shot discreetly from behind and to the side; Quinto head on, facing camera-speaks volumes‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Jan 3, 2017
99% Cameraperson (2016) A labor of love of the highest order.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2016
93% I, Daniel Blake (2017) A climactic emotional explosion momentarily turns Daniel into something of a working-class hero, although Loach could take up that mantle himself.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2016
98% Moonlight (2016) This is a film that resonates in our culture and moment not because it was manufactured to matter, but because in its every breath it has clearly stayed true to itself. This is all we should ask of film.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
73% Staying Vertical (Rester vertical) (2017) An aggressively conceptual cycle-of-life saga that brings the director back to his earlier model.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2016
96% Paterson (2016) We can choose to not be ruled by fear, and a lesser, more didactic film, would underline this. Threats are everywhere, but so are sublimities. All is ephemeral; it's up to us to decide what to try and hold on to.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2016
98% The Babadook (2014) It's unclear at this point if Australian director Jennifer Kent wants to continue making horror films, but judging by her terrifying and moving debut feature, The Babadook, it's obvious that horror needs her.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2016
72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) Parker's dramatization of the 1831 rebellion of Virginia slave Nat Turner is impressively mounted, unimaginatively directed, and dubiously conceived-provocative in title only.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2016
35% Blair Witch (2016) There's a superfluity of recording devices, including mounted body and surveillance cams; old-school mini DV; and even a drone, none of which pay off in any clever or satisfying way.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2016
75% The BFG (2016) When put into self-consciously cinematic form, The BFG becomes too big, too friendly, and too giant, in its rollicking gambols, patronizing slapstick, and certainly in its swelling sentimentality.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2016
87% Mia Madre (2016) It's a movie about death that feels imbued with vivid life.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2016
81% Sunset Song (2016) A master of interior portraiture, Davies opens out here, capturing the vast Scottish exteriors, in times of both summer verdure and autumn harvest, with widescreen epic classicism.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted May 12, 2016
82% Tale of Tales (Il racconto dei racconti) (2016) With a focus on corporeal gore and psychological realism, Tale of Tales attempts to re-Grimmify the fairy tale, rather than fracture or deconstruct it à la the sly Into the Woods or The Princess Bride.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted May 3, 2016
88% Neon Bull (Boi Neon) (2016) The world of Brazilian filmmaker Gabriel Mascaro's Neon Bull is one of beautiful mismatches.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Apr 8, 2016
86% Everybody Wants Some!! (2016) The latest Richard Linklater film could never be mistaken for anything other than a Richard Linklater film. At the same time, there's something unexpected here for the director: a palpable, sensual physicality, tied to an almost entirely male cast.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Apr 1, 2016
91% No Home Movie (2016) This is a film -- a highly constructed one -- of unspeakable emotions, not platitudes; of how life and death can instill a room with meaning, not the lessons we learn from pain and loss.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2016
97% Cemetery of Splendor (2016) The film creates, with the simplest of strokes, a universe where past and present, dream and reality, life and death commingle constantly, yet which is always grounded in a palpable now.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 29, 2016
86% Un Conte de Noël (A Christmas Tale) (2008) Imminent tragedy and bumbling slapstick buffer each other, cynicism and poetic optimism (typified by a lovely closing shot and recitation from Elizabeth) exist side by side, cradled in harmony, all through the night. ‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2016
91% The Witch (2016) Hope for the future of American horror cinema resides in a film that has returned to the past, all the way back to the genre's primal, literary roots.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2016
92% Birdman (2014) Birdman doesn't offer viewers much of an alternative to the things it's poking holes in, but there is an invigorating freedom in its wanting to have a conversation in the first place.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2016
92% Mountains May Depart (Shan he gu ren) (2016) The film gradually makes clear its shape and purpose, accumulating purpose and regret, moment by moment, just like our lives.‐ Reverse Shot
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2016
3/5 97% 45 Years (2015) 45 Years is ultimately not about the larger forces that tear us apart but the demons that lurk in the backs of our minds while we stay together.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2015
70% Into the Woods (2014) Sondheim's cleverness is fascinatingly at odds with a direct morality plainspoken enough for any children who may be listening.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2015
92% Every Little Step (2009) Every Little Step, like A Chorus Line itself, should prove catnip for any self-respecting, self-flagellating actor-dancer.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2014
91% There Will Be Blood (2007) Perhaps the best barometer of Anderson's astonishing success here is that he manages to invest this weighty allegory with such a wealth of character and nuance.‐ Stop Smiling
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2014
94% All Is Lost (2013) The film attains an operatic grandeur in its closing moments, and surprisingly earns it: Chandor's intensely physical, experiential work has brought us right up to the perilous edge between life and death.‐ Sight and Sound
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2014
69% Les Misérables (2012) Ultimately the film's choppy, camera-goes-anywhere approach works well in translating a play that was never all that interested in the movement of bodies anyway-only their martyrdom.‐ Film Comment Magazine
Read More | Posted Nov 5, 2013