Michael Sicinski Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Michael Sicinski

Michael Sicinski
Michael Sicinski's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Village Voice, Movie Mezzanine, Cinema Scope

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
92% Ma (2017) Ma is a complex artwork that engages with movement and space to suggest a cinematic form of body-talk, a language of resistant gesture and queer-feminist transformation.‐ MUBI
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2017
No Score Yet Let Each One Go Where He May (2009) Russell has initiated a project that taps into the tremulous, potentially self-consuming energy that characterizes a truly open art. With the help of his collaborators, he is going his own way.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
80% Robinson in Ruins (2012) As compared to the intensive wandering of the first two films, Ruins is characterized by a kind of stillness, emphasized by an almost musical structure in terms of its visuals. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet When It Was Blue (2005) Part of what makes Reeves' film so thrilling, and so radical from the standpoint of existential/phenomenological politics, is that she doubles down.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
87% La Danse -- Le Ballet de l'Opera de Paris (2009) At least in part, Wiseman's latest success is the result of upping the spectacle and downplaying those detailed, Zolaesque dimensions for which his great novel is usually vaunted.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
99% A Separation (2011) A Separation is one of the year's most accomplished films, and like so many films we might characterize as "accomplished," it hasn't garnered actual detractors. It merely fosters a coterie of skeptics.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% Alexandra (2007) Alexandra is a film made by someone who wants to talk, which is an admirable gesture. It's just not the correct one.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
78% The Robber (2011) This overall orchestration of The Robber as a kind of cinematic device for marking contrastive states of existence is, crucially, mirrored in Rettenberger's own formalistic attitude towards his own existence.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
81% Littlerock (2011) Littlerock isn't a film weighed down by symbolism, and to misconstrue it as such would divert us from its small, idiosyncratic pleasures. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% A Screaming Man (2011) The director finds himself artistically stranded between the allegorical impulse and the will to historicize.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% The Strange Case Of Angelica (2010) Angelica is every bit as concerned with the problems of cinema as Oliveira's more theatrically inclined works, but explores them through more specifically visual means.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
99% Le Havre (2011) It is not a set of moves within and against the system writ large; it zeroes in on individuals, frames them, looks into their eyes, forges space and community with them, in neighborhoods, through moments.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
96% The Artist (2011) Sadly, Hazanavicius is so unskilled, so steeped in the empty signposting of parody and stereotype, that he's actually signaling to us throughout The Artist that we're watching a quaint old art form Lindy Hopping its way to the bone yard.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
80% The Deep Blue Sea (2012) Davies' films, in their own way, are indicative of the social fissures of our moment.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet Autrement, la Molussie (Differently, Molussia) (2012) What is interesting about Rey's treatment of reel randomization in Autrement, la Molussie, I think, is that it enfolds the passages of Anders' novel within a filmic time that is "flattened" or relegated to a universally applicable principle.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
87% The Dark Knight Rises (2012) TDKR is, like the Batman films that have preceded it, an ideological muddle, but none has been so completely devoid of intellectual clarity. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet The Hunt (2012) The fact that anyone is taking The Hunt seriously as a look at community panic around pedophilia, or the mass psychology of scapegoating, or even as a solid slice of middlebrow realism, is truly confounding.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% A Spell To Ward Off The Darkness (2014) A Spell finds their styles melding in the most fascinating ways. There has been a more reserved attitude in many of Rivers' films, a desire to hang back with patient curiosity, which is distinct from Russell's more agitated approach.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
76% The Strange Little Cat (2014) The Strange Little Cat is a film that prioritizes confinement, small movements within that confinement, and the unexpected alleviation of that confinement through imagination and memory.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
71% Man of Tai Chi (2013) Needless to say, The Keanu hasn't got a patch on either Fincher or Assayas stylistically, and while his casting of himself as the eeeevil villain may have been a bold move, his performance could be a career-worst.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
90% Closed Curtain (2014) Closed Curtain enfolds its politics within what I believe will go down as one of cinema's finest, most complex acts of self-portraiture.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
91% The Great Beauty (2013) The Great Beauty is an alleged condemnation of the decadence of Rome and its high society, but inasmuch as it approaches coherence at all.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
No Score Yet Betoniyö (Concrete Night) (2013) This is the sort of film that you watch with a double consciousness, constantly distracted by the battle between visionary impulse and rank cliché.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
91% Child's Pose (2014) Child's Pose is the sort of film that foregrounds a major event rather than a plot per se, in the hope that the exploration of said event will allow character nuance and social significance to waft up from cracks in the façade.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Sarah préfère la course (Sarah Would Rather Run) (2013) The film, frustratingly and a bit offensively, falls very much in line with the "Asperger's chic" that is plaguing art houses and festivals worldwide. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
76% R100 (2015) The self-reflexivity, the bone-dry salaryman foibles, the sudden appearance of Office-style interviews among the assorted dominatrices-are attenuated by a hopelessly tedious A-plot.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
70% Salvation Army (2015) How many filmmakers wallow in the self-indulgent excesses of autobiography? So few are capable of accomplishing what Taïa does here, which is to regard his own story with relative objectivity.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
79% Sacro GRA (2013) Taken on its own merits, Sacro GRA suffers from a structural slackness, as though Rosi's expansive manoeuvre was a bridge too far for the filmmaker. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
80% Camille Claudel, 1915 (2013) Camille Claudel 1915 is the first Dumont film I would truly consider boring. Everything it works so hard to convince us of, we have heard so many times before.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
75% Nymphomaniac: Volume I (2014) Nymphomaniac is Von Trier's most timid film in years. But paradoxically, it's also his most unguarded, the most palpably human.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
92% Dohee-ya (A Girl at My Door) (2015) A Girl at My Door is well-acted and crisply shot, a highly assured debut from Jung who should have a bright future as she grows beyond Lee's tutelage and develops her own voice.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
100% The Valley Below (2014) First things first: this is a pretty good film. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet The Owners (2014) It's difficult to evaluate a film as aggressively unusual as The Owners. Despite its grating quirks and featherweight jabs at social commentary, it cannot be summarily dismissed. This‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
97% Theeb (2015) Part of what makes Theeb such a breath of fresh air is that it narrows its focus, examining a group of individuals (and one in particular) rather than getting stuck in well-meaning liberal "typicality." ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Obra (2014) Graziosi probably could have made a much more successful documentary or an essay film, and one wonders why he didn't.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
56% Futatsume no mado (Still the Water) (2014) Despite Naomi Kawase's claims prior to the film's world premiere at Cannes, Still the Water is not her masterpiece, and it's uncertain she will ever actually make one.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Oorlogsgeheimen (Secrets of War) (2014) This fairly mediocre period piece is what we might call a double-whammy, given that it practically begs for critics to grade it on a curve.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Alive (2014) Information and identity are threads that weave in and out, but again, not in an ostentatious way. Alive's mud-caked proletarian realism allows its deeper structures to remain largely submerged.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Hwajang (2014) It is impressively clear-eyed about aging, illness and death, from the limits of colleagues' sympathy when major projects are on the line to the mutual effort involved in keeping a sex life going in the face of physical deterioration.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
79% A Hard Day (2015) For a film that strives to be hard as nails, A Hard Day is more like cotton candy, crackling on the tongue and evaporating instantly.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
78% Jayuui Eondeok (Hill of Freedom) (2015) Hill of Freedom doesn't rely on linguistic miscues for easy humour. Even in English, it's one of Hong's best films to date, and demonstrates that his jaundiced vision of Korean culture can transcend the specificities of language.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Gyeongju (2014) [Gyeongju] is not a winning combination, and it's difficult to understand how it nabbed a competition slot in Locarno.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
60% The Equalizer (2014) Antoine Fuqua can't direct, and this is abundantly clear in the opening seconds of The Equalizer. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Obce cialo (Foreign Body) (2014) This is a complete mess, but I cannot honestly say whether Zanussi constructed Foreign Body to be exactly the film he wanted it to be and thus he's just off his rocker, or if he has simply lost control of the medium.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
100% Seymour: An Introduction (2015) Whether or not you've studied piano, or any musical instrument, it is fascinating to observe Bernstein's gentle but rigourous technique in correcting errors, training the musicians' bodies, and helping them to locate their own place within the piece.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
100% Songs From The North (2015) While in no way softening the all-encompassing propaganda state of three generations of Great Leader Kims, Songs from the North also displays a rare audacity by showing certain aspects of North Korean life as perfectly normal. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Villa Touma (2014) Sadly, the political and bureaucratic hubbub around Arraf's film is far more interesting than the film itself, which takes on a seldom-explored historical topic and extrudes it into bite-size shells of utter cliché. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet A Young Patriot (2015) More troubling is Du's narrow focus, which turns an entirely comprehensible social shift within China's younger population into a kind of personal narrative, a set of awakenings in response to one man's broadening perspective.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Song Of Songs (Pesn Pesney) (2015) This is an unusual case, an exceedingly brief (only 76-minute) film that still manages to feel overstuffed and meandering. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017
No Score Yet Price Of Love (2015) Hermon Hailay's third feature is a somewhat puzzling melodrama...There is a fundamental inscrutability bedevilling Price of Love that may well pertain to certain constraints on filmmaking in Ethiopia.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017