Michael Sicinski Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Michael Sicinski

Michael Sicinski
Michael Sicinski's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Village Voice, Movie Mezzanine, Cinema Scope

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet The Vice of Hope (Il vizio della speranza) (2018) While dealing with actual social problems of criminality and gendered poverty, The Vice of Hope manages to avoid the dull, prescriptive social realism so typical of "issue pictures." ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2018
No Score Yet Summer Survivors (2018) In a lot of ways, Summer Survivors is as generic as they come... But there is a quiet melancholy that pervades the film, particularly in its thoughtfully shaded character work.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 17, 2018
No Score Yet Before the Frost (Før frosten) (2018) This is a film about uniquely fin-de-siècle problems, even if they do pertain to a somewhat wider human condition.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2018
No Score Yet Redemption (2018) Redemption is filled with small grace notes and undertones that set it apart from the usual fare. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2018
40% Vision (2018) Despite the presence of an international superstar (Juliette Binoche) for the first time in Naomi Kawase's filmography, Vision will not convert anyone to the Kawase cause. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2018
100% What Is Democracy? (2018) One gets the sense that What is Democracy? might have been edited in a different form, one that clarified its purposes a bit more deliberately. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2018
100% Meeting Gorbachev (2019) Still, Herzog is quite correct in his characterization when he cites the Greek concept of kairos: the right man for the right moment. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2018
57% That Time of Year (Den tid på året) (2018) No cliché is left off the menu. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
No Score Yet I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians (Îmi este indiferent daca în istorie vom intra ca barbari) (2018) It's never a pleasant sight to see a film trying to punch above its intellectual weight class. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
83% Belmonte (2018) Belmonte is a film about a male artist who values his family life as much as his art, if not more. It's not only refreshing: it's genuinely sexy.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
No Score Yet Tito and the Birds (Tito e os Pássaros) (2018) Tito and the Birds is a rather uninspired entry, an allegory so blatant in its intent that it's difficult to imagine who'd find it satisfactory. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
No Score Yet The Factory (Zavod) (2018) A slice of social criticism so direct that, judging from its countries of origin, it could not be made inside Putin's Russia, The Factory is also a cracking actioner of the first order. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
No Score Yet Night/EXT. (2018) Although EXT. Night is not a particularly enjoyable film, credit is certainly due. Few movies are as successful in communicating the protagonist's point of view to the spectator through structure and form. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 10, 2018
No Score Yet Divine Wind (2018) Thrumming in the background, providing a solid material basis that the story sometimes lacks, is the exquisite black-and-white cinematography by Mohamed Tayeb Laggoune, crisp and contrasty enough to make Ansel Adams weep.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 10, 2018
No Score Yet Splinters (2018) Splinters has the makings of a bedroom farce, but it is actually played, um, straight.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 10, 2018
100% The River (2018) Although the third act of The River becomes more plot-driven than it really needs to, much of the film is conveyed through rhythm, framing, and atmosphere. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 8, 2018
63% Jirga (2018) Actually shot in Pakistan and Afghanistan, with some performers who themselves are former Taliban, there is an undeniable power to Jirga... But a cursory step back reminds us that Jirga would not pass muster in the court of basic plausibility.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2018
71% In My Room (2018) In My Room's most remarkable and bracing feat with respect to temporality is really just the transformation in Armin himself.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
83% Museum (Museo) (2018) A not-very-bright film about a very intelligent topic, Museo tries to hedge its bets one too many times.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
22% Girls of the Sun (Les filles du soleil) (2018) But in more ways than one, Girls of the Sun seems at war with itself.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
80% Styx (2018) Quite literally dead in the water.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
94% Sorry to Bother You (2018) It's a comedy with a lot on its mind, to be sure. But what Riley has accomplished with this film is notable because of all the ways it could fall flat but doesn't.‐ Nashville Scene
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018
No Score Yet Jamilia (Djamilia) (2018) There is an overall lack of cohesion that makes Djamilia far less potent than it could have been.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2018
No Score Yet Streetscapes (Dialogue) (2017) One of the best films of 2017.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2018
No Score Yet Spell Reel (2017) The result is a dialectical montage reminiscent of both Harun Farocki and Travis Wilkerson.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2018
No Score Yet Shakedown (2018) Rich with personalities, politically astute, and as nasty as it wants to be, Shakedown is a queer cultural intervention on par with Paris is Burning, without the touristic undertones.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2018
92% Ma (2017) Ma is a complex artwork that engages with movement and space to suggest a cinematic form of body-talk, a language of resistant gesture and queer-feminist transformation.‐ MUBI
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2017
No Score Yet Let Each One Go Where He May (2009) Russell has initiated a project that taps into the tremulous, potentially self-consuming energy that characterizes a truly open art. With the help of his collaborators, he is going his own way.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
80% Robinson in Ruins (2012) As compared to the intensive wandering of the first two films, Ruins is characterized by a kind of stillness, emphasized by an almost musical structure in terms of its visuals. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet When It Was Blue (2005) Part of what makes Reeves' film so thrilling, and so radical from the standpoint of existential/phenomenological politics, is that she doubles down.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
87% La Danse -- Le Ballet de l'Opera de Paris (2009) At least in part, Wiseman's latest success is the result of upping the spectacle and downplaying those detailed, Zolaesque dimensions for which his great novel is usually vaunted.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
99% A Separation (2011) A Separation is one of the year's most accomplished films, and like so many films we might characterize as "accomplished," it hasn't garnered actual detractors. It merely fosters a coterie of skeptics.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% Alexandra (2007) Alexandra is a film made by someone who wants to talk, which is an admirable gesture. It's just not the correct one.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
78% The Robber (2011) This overall orchestration of The Robber as a kind of cinematic device for marking contrastive states of existence is, crucially, mirrored in Rettenberger's own formalistic attitude towards his own existence.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
81% Littlerock (2011) Littlerock isn't a film weighed down by symbolism, and to misconstrue it as such would divert us from its small, idiosyncratic pleasures. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% A Screaming Man (2011) The director finds himself artistically stranded between the allegorical impulse and the will to historicize.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
85% The Strange Case Of Angelica (2010) Angelica is every bit as concerned with the problems of cinema as Oliveira's more theatrically inclined works, but explores them through more specifically visual means.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
99% Le Havre (2011) It is not a set of moves within and against the system writ large; it zeroes in on individuals, frames them, looks into their eyes, forges space and community with them, in neighborhoods, through moments.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
95% The Artist (2011) Sadly, Hazanavicius is so unskilled, so steeped in the empty signposting of parody and stereotype, that he's actually signaling to us throughout The Artist that we're watching a quaint old art form Lindy Hopping its way to the bone yard.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
80% The Deep Blue Sea (2012) Davies' films, in their own way, are indicative of the social fissures of our moment.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet Autrement, la Molussie (Differently, Molussia) (2012) What is interesting about Rey's treatment of reel randomization in Autrement, la Molussie, I think, is that it enfolds the passages of Anders' novel within a filmic time that is "flattened" or relegated to a universally applicable principle.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
87% The Dark Knight Rises (2012) TDKR is, like the Batman films that have preceded it, an ideological muddle, but none has been so completely devoid of intellectual clarity. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet The Hunt (2012) The fact that anyone is taking The Hunt seriously as a look at community panic around pedophilia, or the mass psychology of scapegoating, or even as a solid slice of middlebrow realism, is truly confounding.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
88% A Spell To Ward Off The Darkness (2014) A Spell finds their styles melding in the most fascinating ways. There has been a more reserved attitude in many of Rivers' films, a desire to hang back with patient curiosity, which is distinct from Russell's more agitated approach.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
76% The Strange Little Cat (2014) The Strange Little Cat is a film that prioritizes confinement, small movements within that confinement, and the unexpected alleviation of that confinement through imagination and memory.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
71% Man of Tai Chi (2013) Needless to say, The Keanu hasn't got a patch on either Fincher or Assayas stylistically, and while his casting of himself as the eeeevil villain may have been a bold move, his performance could be a career-worst.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
90% Closed Curtain (2014) Closed Curtain enfolds its politics within what I believe will go down as one of cinema's finest, most complex acts of self-portraiture.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
90% The Great Beauty (2013) The Great Beauty is an alleged condemnation of the decadence of Rome and its high society, but inasmuch as it approaches coherence at all.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
No Score Yet Betoniyö (Concrete Night) (2013) This is the sort of film that you watch with a double consciousness, constantly distracted by the battle between visionary impulse and rank cliché.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 22, 2017
91% Child's Pose (2014) Child's Pose is the sort of film that foregrounds a major event rather than a plot per se, in the hope that the exploration of said event will allow character nuance and social significance to waft up from cracks in the façade.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2017