Peter Ackroyd Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Peter Ackroyd

Peter Ackroyd
Peter Ackroyd's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
90% Melvin and Howard (1980) Everything is all right really -- it tells us -- as long as there are good guys like Melvin to add a little human decency and a touch of naive fun to the great game show of life. I found this melancholy, however, rather than inspiring.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
100% This Is Elvis (1981) Although the film resembles a child's drawing of a life, it is enlivened by the use of documentary material which, if it does nothing else, at least recreates that era When 'rock-and-roll' was seen as the harbinger of things to come.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
No Score Yet Without Anesthesia (1979) The development of the central theme carries its own conviction, and the acting throughout is excellent, remaining so close to the texture of ordinary emotional life that the larger statements of the film gain an otherwise elusive credibility.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
71% City of Women (La città delle donne) (1981) Stylists are only interesting when they consciously choose to forego substance. Fellini can't make that choice. And, when he tries to be serious, he succeeds only in becoming meretricious.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
No Score Yet The Blood of Hussain (1983) Blood of Hussain is simple propaganda and, however well-intentioned or honourable it may be, it differs very little from Russian films about happy workers or American films about happy housewives. The only real blood spilled here is that of the truth.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
No Score Yet Retrato de Teresa (Portrait of Teresa) (1979) Since the nodal point is Teresa herself, it is a tribute to the acting of Daysi Granados that she remains a real and even sympathetic figure throughout.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
No Score Yet Blood Feud (1980) It is as if Lina Wertmuller shot some comic scenes, and then changed her mind about the film; she shot some serious scenes, and then changed her mind again. In her confusion, she forgot to edit the film properly and somehow mislaid a vital 15 minutes.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
100% Atlantic City (1980) It combines French discipline and nonchalance with an American generosity and high spirits. The dialogue is precise and often witty, qualities it shares with the acting.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2018
82% 9 to 5 (1980) The three women rise up against the oppressive male establishment, and systematically humiliate and abuse their boss in a number of not terribly funny scenes.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
74% The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981) Nothing is left to chance; which means that the responses of the audience aren't left to chance, either. It was as if something were being put over on us. We were in some obscure way, being cheated. The director had reacted for us in advance.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
No Score Yet Constans (The Constant Factor) (2011) (Krzysztof Zanussi) takes prevailing social conditions and presents them in so cold a light that they seem harder and clearer -- in the way that water changes to ice.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
No Score Yet In God We Tru$t (In God We Trust) (Gimme That Prime Time Religion) (1980) The essential problem seems to be that it is centred around Mr Feldman himself, and he is not yet able to sustain the level of intensity and interest which is required.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
No Score Yet Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980) None of this would matter -- or work on the screen -- without the performance of Catherine Hicks as Monroe. She is almost as good as the real thing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
96% The Long Good Friday (1982) The film lingers in the mind as an exposure of one man's illusions about himself and his world. Reality intrudes upon him like the hands around someone's neck.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
95% Raging Bull (1980) This is, I suppose, a film about a slob, a violent and stupid man whose few brains are knocked even further sideways every time he enters the ring. But, somehow, he becomes intriguing in the telling.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
61% American Pop (1981) Although the plot, like the music itself, can be somewhat too strident, the animation is remarkably successful in delineating the sad geography of the human body and the massive backgrounds of American cities.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
64% Aus dem Leben der Marionetten (From the Life of the Marionettes) (1980) The film is very restrained, rather cool, and with an unabashed fluency of direction which prevents it from becoming enmired in the stickier reaches of the Scandinavian soul.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
77% The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981) Because there is no consistency of character, and therefore of meaning, the plot lurches around, to the evident bewilderment of the audience; the closing scenes are a terrible mess.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
No Score Yet Quartet (1981) Quartet itself adopts the characteristics of the life which it celebrates -- elegant, reticent, with a deep respect for cinematic conventions and for the life of surfaces.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
88% Coal Miner's Daughter (1980) Because the film never breaks out of its conventional matrix, it never really becomes interesting. Despite Sissy Spacek's. performance. it is impossible to feel much for her or for her family.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2018
78% Excalibur (1981) The attempt in Excalibur to produce recognisable or at least historical figures results only in a kind of anachronistic bathos; the content of the film never quite matches up to the technological and cinematic expertise which went into its production.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
83% Tess (1979) We are driven back to Hardy at the end and Tess is proof, if proof is needed, of the power of that individual imagination which can survive changes of form.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2018
56% Mommie Dearest (1981) And so Mommie Dearest becomes a kind of homage to the monster herself - the emotions are so splendid, the scenes so dramatic, the experiences so incandescent.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
91% Eraserhead (1977) It is the vision of the paranoid transposed upon the screen; the fact that it remains extremely interesting ought, I suppose, to be worrying. But perhaps our eyes have become so desensitised that nothing, any more, will widen the iris.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2015
No Score Yet Radio On (1980) It is this artificiality which eventually destroys the film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2015
69% A Little Romance (1979) The film's title is too modest -- theirs is a big romance.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2015
83% Chariots of Fire (1981) It is an affirmation of clouded and second-hand values -- and, as a result, it becomes vulgar.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2015
90% Ordinary People (1980) It would be unfair to blame Ordinary People for the culture from which it springs; and, within its limits, this is an entertaining and skillful film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Aug 4, 2015
95% Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) It is intensely watchable, with the relentless accumulation of effects used here for the purposes of eliciting suspense rather than provoking comedy.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2015
57% Heaven's Gate (1980) Neither Kris Kristofferson nor Christopher Walken, both of them fine actors, can prevail against the relentless scale and movement of the production.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2015
90% Mad Max (1979) Suffers from a case of terminal fatigue.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted May 11, 2015
89% The Stunt Man (1980) The narrative doesn't come to life until Peter O'Toole wraps it around himself like a Renaissance cloak, and stares pensively into the distance.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2015
90% Martin (1977) I kept my eyes open throughout Martin, but it was principally in disbelief.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2002