Peter Gray

Peter Gray
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
Peter began his freelance writing career in 2010 with QNews, one of Australia's top-rated LGBT-friendly magazines. Biding his time between film reviews and entertainment reports and interviews, his freelance career has grown to include a multitude of outlets based across Australia (The AU Review, This Is Film, Brisbanista) covering weekly film releases and national events and premieres.

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
2/5 24% Brothers By Blood (2021) An all-too ordinary mob story that seems unfortunately content with coaxing by on familiarity. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2021
3/5 34% The Marksman (2021) There's an odd comfort in these type of Neeson-led action films, and that feeling of familiarity manages to push The Marksman a little closer to his recommended target. - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2021
82% Ten Minutes To Midnight (2020) Ten Minutes to Midnight is a B-grade feature wrapped up in a 1980's mindset that gloriously marches to its own bizarre beat. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2021
68% Penguin Bloom (2021) A moving lead turn, and warm, inviting visuals result in Penguin Bloom's innocuous tone being easily digested. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2021
96% Baby, Done (2021) The investment created for us to care about these characters goes a long way, resulting in the film utilising its distinct charm in the best possible manner. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 20, 2021
84% Our Friend (2020) A suitably moving, though standard drama detailing the hardships of cancer and the unconditionality of friendship in its purest form. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 20, 2021
98% One Night in Miami (2020) Such is the collective power of the elemental talent involved, it's difficult to not surrender to such storytelling when it proves equally as compelling as it does beautiful. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
29% Music (2020) It's a very surface level look at disability, with Sia's ideas better than the actual execution. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2021
60% Go/Don't Go (2021) A quiet, sensitive project that thrives more metaphorically than methodically. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2021
3/5 100% Rams (2021) Its harmless, everyday-Aussie mentality will win over crowds who like their cinema uncomplicated, undemanding, and inoffensive. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2021
33% The One You Feed (2020) May not impress with its ambiguous nature but at least makes a mark as a project of experimental nature. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 6, 2021
46% Fatale (2020) What should've been extra is just a basic thriller, albeit with a little convolution, that only succeeds off the commitment from [Hilary] Swank. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 3, 2021
3.5/5 76% Pieces of a Woman (2020) If you feel its subject matter is something you can face though, then [Kornel] Mundruczo's reactive film is worth the endurance. - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2020
4/5 100% The Dry (2021) Literally and metaphorically adhering to a tinderbox mentality, The Dry is neatly paced, smartly written, and consistently engrossing. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2020
93% End of the Century (2019) Takes an otherwise straightforward narrative and morphs it into something far more emotionally evocative. - Qnews EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2020
49% Monster Hunter (2020) Another prime example of the medium not translating to the screen in a coherent manner, instead exploding on the big screen in an incomprehensible mess that recycles most of what we've already seen in countless sci-fi actioners prior. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2020
5/5 96% Nomadland (2020) An emotionally-charged masterpiece, Nomadland is a celebration in owning your happiness - in whatever form that may be. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2020
4.5/5 95% Soul (2020) A far more meaningful film now given the climate of the world at hand, Soul is a deeply-felt, oft-hilarious, more experimental effort from Pixar that serves as a lovely ode to both life and death. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2020
60% Wonder Woman 1984 (2020) WW84 is an engaging continuation that honours everything that made the first film so special, whilst updating it in a manner that imbues the film with an autonomous freshness - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
32% Superintelligence (2019) Rarely funny and completely nonsensical - the plot is an absolute mess - Superintelligence wastes genuine talent on an absolute non-event of a movie - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
2.5/5 59% Dreamland (2019) Its script fails to engage as much as it should, leaving what could have been a sweeping affair more an average fling that leaves little impression - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
4/5 91% Promising Young Woman (2020) The type of delicious indulgence that will ultimately make your stomach churn - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
3.5/5 77% The Croods: A New Age (2020) Serves as a reminder of a simpler time in cinema, when family entertainment was a cheerful outing to the multiplexes and animated offerings didn't rebel against their structure - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2020
3.5/5 81% I'm Your Woman (2020) I'm Your Woman is an examination of learning self-sufficiency in both marriage and motherhood against the violent grain of the criminal underworld. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2020
2/5 31% The Stand In (2020) Though The Stand In gives the delightful [Drew Barrymore] plenty of meat to chew on - she has no less than three roles to play with, all distinctly different in their delivery - it's ultimately a film that sadly doesn't know what to do with her energy. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 9, 2020
3.5/5 73% Archenemy (2020) Those who appreciate grit, and can swallow a narrative that isn't solely relying on action to propel itself forward, [Adam Egypt] Mortimer's bold outing should hopefully find a receptive audience. - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 9, 2020
89% Words on Bathroom Walls (2020) Whilst the Nick Naveda-penned script indulges in a few schmaltzy teen romance tropes, Words on Bathroom Walls always feels like a real film, commenting on ominous themes with a delicate balance as to not overwhelm its audience - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 9, 2020
4/5 92% The Furnace (2020) Embracing the western genre and all its tropes, whilst simultaneously announcing himself as a filmmaker with something specific to say, [Roderick] MacKay brings a sense of urgency to a traditional tale - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2020
57% The Prom (2020) Is essentially Glee: The Movie, with unsubtle performances, impressive musical numbers and a message of acceptance and inclusivity that's just a little too aggressive. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2020
3.5/5 75% The Rental (2020) Those who savour a gradual build up and characters who feel like real people, however flawed they are, The Rental should prove a satisfying destination. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2020
4/5 96% The Bee Gees: How Can You Mend a Broken Heart (2020) Just as much about their music as it is their familial bond, How Can You Mend a Broken Heart manages to toe the line of appeal for both long-time fans and the uninitiated. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2020
1/5 29% The War with Grandpa (2020) The War with Grandpa is one battle where there are no ultimate winners. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2020
83% Happiest Season (2020) Its healthy balance of conventional mentality and community respect should see it as both a staple holiday title and the hopeful start of a new wave of inclusive storytelling. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 26, 2020
79% Uncle Frank (2020) [Paul] Bettany is simply luminous as Frank, creating a fully realised character out of what could've been an archetypal profile, driving a very effective heartfelt beat underneath a familiar cavity. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
3/5 82% Let Him Go (2020) A 1960's set, western-slanted revenge piece that takes a little longer than it should to get where it needs to go, but packs enough of a punch upon arrival to make it worth the journey. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
91% Run (2020) A tale of survival intertwined with a story of abuse wrapped in the guise of a horror movie, Run executes its Misery-adjacent narrative with precision, occasional dark humour, and genuine terror. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
3/5 59% All My Life (2020) In a year like 2020, overt sugary cliches aren't necessarily a bad thing when the packaging is as appealing as this. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
4/5 94% Palm Springs (2020) Seemingly enjoying the fact that it constantly tests the limits of its concept throughout its brisk 90 minute running time, Palm Springs is an earnest, heartfelt film that's both emotionally mature and comedically youthful. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 18, 2020
3.5/5 86% Misbehaviour (2020) Whilst the Gaby Chiappe/Rebecca Frayn-penned script dabbles in cliched narrative beats and doesn't always give the character focus some players deserve, Misbehaviour still tells an important story, one that sadly still holds relevance and weight in 2020. - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2020
No Score Yet Unthinkable (2020) Succeeding more so as an announcement to promising filmmakers to what's possible as opposed to being a must-see production on its entertainment grounds, Unthinkable suggests viable potential for [George] Loomis and [Elias] Talbot as filmmakers. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2020
46% Fatman (2020) There's satirical potential that's never fully realised. There's a morality tale that never feels earned. And there's a violent action film that never embraces the lunacy enough to be successful. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2020
3.5/5 76% Summerland (2020) May be a familiar destination at its core, but viewed through [Jessica] Swale's fresh eyes gives this trip a new lease of undiscovered territory. - Brisbanista EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 11, 2020
4/5 83% Freaky (2020) A crowd-pleasing crossed-genre event that's deeper, funnier, and more committed than it has any right to be - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 11, 2020
62% Radioactive (2020) Radioactive feels far too disorientating as a feature, distancing its audience from its subject when it's so apparent it's trying with might to frame her as a figure of admiration. - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 4, 2020
87% 1BR (2020) Working with the simplest of premises, but managing to transform it into something particularly inventive, Apartment 1BR suggests writer/director David Marmor has a strong career ahead of him - This is Film EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2020
3/5 48% The Craft: Legacy (2020) For The Craft: Legacy, a sequel-cum-reimagining, the foundations laid down within [Andrew] Fleming's narrative are adhered to, and though writer/director Zoe Lister-Jones is respectful to the source material, she places her own spin on proceedings. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 28, 2020
49% The Witches (2020) When mirrored to the 1990 original, it fails. As its own fantasy film, it's just not that exciting, not to mention overly explained to the point of annoyance. - CRPWrites EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2020
4/5 89% Kajillionaire (2020) As heightened as the situation at hand may be, [Miranda] July keeps things grounded just enough that Kajillionaire feels like a narrative that very easily could play out in a relatable reality. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2020
2/5 39% Honest Thief (2020) Ironically cheats us out of even the most minute form of entertainment. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2020
3.5/5 85% Borat: Subsequent Moviefilm (2020) When [Sacha Baron] Cohen targets politics, Borat Subsequent Moviefilm is mind-numbing and, honestly, where it thrives as a commentary on the current state of the world. When the film aims for cheaper, more crude comedy, it's passable. - The AU Review EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2020