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      Rating Title | Year Author Quote
      Greatest Days (2023) Nikki Baughan It may be fuelled by the schmaltzy lyrics of a boy band, but this is ultimately a clear-eyed celebration of female friendship.
      Posted Jun 10, 2023
      Anita (2023) Fionnuala Halligan The film views her survival as a triumph and in that way, it matches its subject’s approach to life.
      Posted May 31, 2023
      The Boogeyman (2023) Nikki Baughan Savage brings an innate humanness and playful spirit that lifts this otherwise-rote monster movie.
      Posted May 31, 2023
      Abbé Pierre – A Century of Devotion (2023) Allan Hunter The sweeping saga of Abbé Pierre’s inspirational life offers handsomely crafted storytelling aimed at a mainstream audience...
      Posted May 27, 2023
      In Our Day (2023) Jonathan Romney Won’t earn Hong any new fans, but avid followers will enjoy its elusive felicities and love puzzling over its enigmatic gaps.
      Posted May 27, 2023
      Strangers by Night (2023) Wendy Ide Makes heavy weather of what should be an airily impetuous connection.
      Posted May 27, 2023
      Love Gets a Room (2021) Jonathan Holland A fine technical achievement, a moving inquiry into what young love can mean under such conditions, and Cortés' strongest film since 2010's Buried.
      Posted May 26, 2023
      The Old Oak (2023) Jonathan Romney [Loach] could hardly have delivered a more resonant, timely or indeed angry swansong than this feature which takes up arms against the decay of national compassion.
      Posted May 26, 2023
      La Chimera (2023) Lee Marshall This strange, messy, resonant film aims to unearth buried treasure. And, like the illegal excavations that provide its narrative baseline, it succeeds when it doesn’t worry too much about neatness and precision.
      Posted May 26, 2023
      Salem (2023) Jonathan Romney An eccentric but absolutely individual proposition. Young audiences especially should take to a film that mixes familiar genre action with romance and a wild-eyed visionary streak.
      Posted May 26, 2023
      Last Summer (2023) Wendy Ide It is something of a jump to believe that the characters would act on their desire. And all the uncomfortably overlong scenes of breathless, panting abandon fail to convince otherwise.
      Posted May 25, 2023
      Perfect Days (2023) Jonathan Romney This is a philosophical contemplation that is very much about something – a meaning-of-life film, no less – with an introverted, immensely likeable central performance from Koji Yakusho.
      Posted May 25, 2023
      All to Play For (2023) Nikki Baughan All To Play For is a film rooted in hardship, yet defiantly not defined by it.
      Posted May 25, 2023
      Kennedy (2023) Fionnuala Halligan Kashyap’s pulpily violent thriller is long on style (Kennedy wears a Vin Diesel-alike face mask) and not short enough elsewhere.
      Posted May 25, 2023
      Room 999 (2023) Amber Wilkinson While Wenders’ original film feels rather more playful... Playoust’s response succeeds in other ways. One of the most engaging things about her approach is the range of voices she has gathered.
      Posted May 25, 2023
      Agra (2023) Namrata Joshi The characters are developed well and have complexity to them, and the terrific ensemble cast elevates the film; particularly Bose, Agarwal and Roy...
      Posted May 24, 2023
      Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell (2023) Allan Hunter The entrancing debut feature from Pham Thien An becomes a quest for understanding and certainty in a Vietnam that seems unable to provide any clear answers.
      Posted May 24, 2023
      Hopeless (2023) Lee Marshall There’s a clarity of vision and a control of mood that sets Hopeless above the run of hard-boiled genre titles.
      Posted May 24, 2023
      No Love Lost (2023) Fionnuala Halligan Le Duc struggles to get to the heart of what he is saying, spinning off into flimsy sequences which sometimes make the film look like it is being made up as it goes along.
      Posted May 24, 2023
      Kidnapped (2023) Lee Marshall A study in what happens when fragile human values come up against an autocratic system underpinned by immovable dogma.
      Posted May 24, 2023
      A Song Sung Blue (2023) John Berra This delicate affair lingers longer than one might expect, as Geng’s sensitive direction of Liu Yining’s nuanced screenplay imbues familiar tropes with a fresh perspective.
      Posted May 24, 2023
      Kubi (2023) Lee Marshall Kubi seems to want to be a rousing samurai movie while simultaneously undermining the whole genre. Alas, Akira Kurosawa’s Yojimbo still remains one of the few films ever to have pulled that act off successfully.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Grace (2023) Wendy Ide A picture that explores generational tensions and a coming-of-age narrative distinctively and originally.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Man in Black (2023) Jonathan Romney It’s a sobering, striking work – as much performance piece as documentary per se, and a notable departure from Wang Bing’s usual objective observational mode.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Terrestrial Verses (2023) Neil Young The quotidian mechanics of social repression are crisply evoked in Terrestrial Verses, the first directorial collaboration between rising Iranian talents Alireza Khatami and Ali Asgari.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Légua (2023) Wendy Ide A film that embraces the mundane rhythms of domestic service as a means to interrogate the end of an era, but which is too passive in its storytelling to drive its point home.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      The Buriti Flower (2023) Allan Hunter Blending elements of documentary and drama, it immerses us in the lives of a people constantly facing threats to their existence.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Power Alley (2023) Wendy Ide A punchy, confrontational energy infuses this celebration of queer sisterhood in the face of Brazilian conservatism.
      Posted May 23, 2023
      Marguerite's Theorem (2023) Neil Young About half an hour in it’s possible to accurately forecast nearly every significant narrative beat.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Club Zero (2023) Wendy Ide It looks terrific – as always Hausner’s use of colour and costume is striking and eloquent – but this is a thinly-written picture that operates on a largely superficial level.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      The (Ex)perience of Love (2023) Amber Wilkinson Debay and Gousseau are an amiable pairing, and their dialogue-rich scenes are stopped from feeling static by the use of jump cuts that add an elliptical feel to conversations and help with the pace.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Fallen Leaves (2023) Jonathan Romney While this one isn’t perhaps quite prime vintage, anyone who loves [Kaurismäki’s] paradoxically joyous melancholia – cinema that is, let’s say, happy on the inside – will take this one to heart.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Lost Country (2023) Wendy Ide This impressive, nuanced picture works as a coming-of-age story, an examination of Balkan generational guilt and a mercurial portrait of a career politician.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      The Settlers (2023) Wendy Ide The Settlers shows promise: it’s the work of a daring director intent on developing a distinctive and original voice.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      The Little Mermaid (2023) Nikki Baughan The slow pacing, often-overwrought emotion and undeniably outdated story mean that it fails to make much of a splash.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      The Other Laurens (2023) Neil Young While the main narrative is only haltingly engaging, there are plentiful compensations and distractions along the way as the picture ambles at a slow-burn pace towards a heavily signposted violent finale.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Sleep (2023) Jonathan Romney Rings imaginative and sometimes tricksy changes on a simple somnambulism premise.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      The Book of Solutions (2023) Lee Marshall For anyone who has always meant to start a masterpiece, but found life always gets in the way.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Bonnard, Pierre & Marthe (2023) Lisa Nesselson There should be at least a small audience in every country with an art museum for Bonnard, Pierre And Marthe, a touching, visually fetching and educational look at the intertwining of art and stubborn romance.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Eureka (2023) Jonathan Romney Eureka is executed with undeniable audacity, and the ride is genuinely surprising and unpredictable – and yet it’s a gruellingly extended one, with longueurs where the action goes dead.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Little Girl Blue (2023) Allan Hunter An emotional personal journey is conveyed in this unconventional docu-drama graced by a committed central performance from Marion Cotillard.
      Posted May 22, 2023
      Blackbird Blackbird Blackberry (2023) Allan Hunter An endearing, bittersweet portrait of an independent woman at the mercy of society’s entrenched expectations.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      Pictures of Ghosts (2023) Lee Marshall A heartfelt love letter to filmmaking and film watching the world over.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      Along Came Love (2023) Wendy Ide This is a solid, watchable drama that... evocatively tallies the costs of living on the wrong side of social and sexual conventions in the 1950s and 60s.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      The Breaking Ice (2023) Fionnuala Halligan There’s a lot to look at; albeit disappointingly little to digest.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      Mambar Pierrette (2023) Tara Judah A smartly spun tapestry of everyday life in the city of Douala in Cameroon.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      If Only I Could Hibernate (2023) Nikki Baughan [An] assured feature debut from Mongolian filmmaker Zoljargal Puevdash...
      Posted May 21, 2023
      Bread and Roses (2023) Allan Hunter Uses the experiences of three Afghanistan women to convey the devastating wider impact on the lives of women facing the loss of basic rights.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      Anatomy of a Fall (2023) Lee Marshall Anatomy of a Fall takes a while to engage, but turns into a twisty, thought-provoking drama.
      Posted May 21, 2023
      May December (2023) Jonathan Romney [May December] offers sly stylistic play, together with a terrific pairing of two performers on great form – Natalie Portman and long-term Haynes lead Julianne Moore, engaged in brisk mirror play.
      Posted May 20, 2023
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