The Blue Bird Reviews

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Feb 25, 2015

    Okay version of the story but best for young children or fans of the stars. Some of the costumes are amazing but for something that apparently cost many millions most of the sets are terribly shoddy.

    Okay version of the story but best for young children or fans of the stars. Some of the costumes are amazing but for something that apparently cost many millions most of the sets are terribly shoddy.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Dec 30, 2013

    For the crime of going into forbidden territory on the other side of the river, their mother(Elizabeth Taylor) sends Tyltyl(Todd Lookinland) and Mytyl(Patsy Kensit) to bed without dinner, but soon has second thoughts. By that time, her children are already dreaming of a lavish party at a nearby castle. When they return, they are greeted by a witch(Elizabeth Taylor) who gives Tyltyl a magic hat which sheds light on the situation, revealing the souls of many household elements who help the children on a quest to find the blue bird. Their first stop is to visit their late grandparents(Will Geer & Mona Washbourne). Once you get past some of the outre elements of "The Blue Bird" like its occasionally imaginative production design and a once in a lifetime cast that also includes Cicely Tyson and an out-of-sorts Jane Fonda(at least Ava Gardner knows how to make an entrance), what is left is a sweet childhood fable that has the neat moral of treasuring what is truly important in life. At the same time, it confirms what everybody has always suspected about cats. That holds true even with the movie's half-hearted attempt at being a musical.

    For the crime of going into forbidden territory on the other side of the river, their mother(Elizabeth Taylor) sends Tyltyl(Todd Lookinland) and Mytyl(Patsy Kensit) to bed without dinner, but soon has second thoughts. By that time, her children are already dreaming of a lavish party at a nearby castle. When they return, they are greeted by a witch(Elizabeth Taylor) who gives Tyltyl a magic hat which sheds light on the situation, revealing the souls of many household elements who help the children on a quest to find the blue bird. Their first stop is to visit their late grandparents(Will Geer & Mona Washbourne). Once you get past some of the outre elements of "The Blue Bird" like its occasionally imaginative production design and a once in a lifetime cast that also includes Cicely Tyson and an out-of-sorts Jane Fonda(at least Ava Gardner knows how to make an entrance), what is left is a sweet childhood fable that has the neat moral of treasuring what is truly important in life. At the same time, it confirms what everybody has always suspected about cats. That holds true even with the movie's half-hearted attempt at being a musical.

  • Feb 21, 2013

    A Magnificent interpretation full of love by Elizabeth Taylor

    A Magnificent interpretation full of love by Elizabeth Taylor

  • Jan 19, 2013

    Lumbering, garish musical version of the famous story; the costumes are dreadful.

    Lumbering, garish musical version of the famous story; the costumes are dreadful.

  • Sep 19, 2012

    All three Blue Bird movies I've seen do have their positives and negatives. The silent version is still the best though, I think this ranks 2nd, and the Shirley Temple one ranks third. This one has lots of Star Power, With Elizabeth Taylor as Light, Jane Fonda as Night, Cicely Tyson as the cat, and the two kids, Tood Lookinland (Mike's Brother) and Patty Kensit (Mrs. Liam Gallagher). All three of the movies have their owir own charms and oddities.. I did like the "Desire" hall in this one more, but the ballet has got to go.

    All three Blue Bird movies I've seen do have their positives and negatives. The silent version is still the best though, I think this ranks 2nd, and the Shirley Temple one ranks third. This one has lots of Star Power, With Elizabeth Taylor as Light, Jane Fonda as Night, Cicely Tyson as the cat, and the two kids, Tood Lookinland (Mike's Brother) and Patty Kensit (Mrs. Liam Gallagher). All three of the movies have their owir own charms and oddities.. I did like the "Desire" hall in this one more, but the ballet has got to go.

  • Dec 04, 2011

    Where is the bird that is blue? A brother and sister live a modest lifestyle in the outskirts of town away from the more fortunate. One night they observe fireworks and follow the lights to a home with a plethora of food and resources. They quickly become envious of the family and return home before being noticed. Upon returning home the objects and resources of their house turn into people and lead them on an adventure. "They eat whatever they want." "Everyday?" "So I'm told." George Cukor, director of My Fair Lady, Let's Make Love, Rich and Famous, The Marrying Kind, A Double Life, and Keeper of the Flame, delivers The Blue Bird. This film contains a standard family plot and overall good premise for children. The acting is solid and the settings and costumes are stunning. The cast includes Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda, Ava Gardner, Cicely Tyson, Harry Andrews, and Robert Morley. "That's just like the slaps you gave me when you were alive." The Blue Bird was a film my wife DVR'd when she noticed it contained such an impressive cast. Well, this film is only average and does not introduce anything new to the genre; however, it was entertaining to watch the film progress and to see what ultimately happens. I recommend seeing this as a family but I don't recommend going too out of your way to see it. "I am the light that makes men see." Grade: C

    Where is the bird that is blue? A brother and sister live a modest lifestyle in the outskirts of town away from the more fortunate. One night they observe fireworks and follow the lights to a home with a plethora of food and resources. They quickly become envious of the family and return home before being noticed. Upon returning home the objects and resources of their house turn into people and lead them on an adventure. "They eat whatever they want." "Everyday?" "So I'm told." George Cukor, director of My Fair Lady, Let's Make Love, Rich and Famous, The Marrying Kind, A Double Life, and Keeper of the Flame, delivers The Blue Bird. This film contains a standard family plot and overall good premise for children. The acting is solid and the settings and costumes are stunning. The cast includes Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda, Ava Gardner, Cicely Tyson, Harry Andrews, and Robert Morley. "That's just like the slaps you gave me when you were alive." The Blue Bird was a film my wife DVR'd when she noticed it contained such an impressive cast. Well, this film is only average and does not introduce anything new to the genre; however, it was entertaining to watch the film progress and to see what ultimately happens. I recommend seeing this as a family but I don't recommend going too out of your way to see it. "I am the light that makes men see." Grade: C

  • Aug 10, 2011

    This co-production between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. from the mid-seventies is such a waste of talent it's amazing. I remember seeing this as a child but couldn't recall anything about it. Now revisiting it, I can see why I forgot it. The whole thing is so uninspired and washed out. It was like the two countries were trying to just get along but were really not interested in making the best product possible. Hard to believe George Cukor directed this. Even hard to believe is that the amazing cinematographer Freddie Young ("Lawrence of Arabia," "Doctor Zhivago," etc.) did the photography. On the plus side, Elizabeth Taylor looks lovely in her various roles and a very young Patsy Kensit has some charm and gives a better performance than her major co-stars including Jane Fonda, Cicely Tyson, Ava Gardner, etc. The Russian performers are at an obvious disadvantage and are poorly dubbed. And the ballets are just a bunch of jumping around and waving of arms. (This is choreography?) Irwin Kostal has a few nice moments but his score is largely unmemorable. File this under "What were they thinking?"

    This co-production between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. from the mid-seventies is such a waste of talent it's amazing. I remember seeing this as a child but couldn't recall anything about it. Now revisiting it, I can see why I forgot it. The whole thing is so uninspired and washed out. It was like the two countries were trying to just get along but were really not interested in making the best product possible. Hard to believe George Cukor directed this. Even hard to believe is that the amazing cinematographer Freddie Young ("Lawrence of Arabia," "Doctor Zhivago," etc.) did the photography. On the plus side, Elizabeth Taylor looks lovely in her various roles and a very young Patsy Kensit has some charm and gives a better performance than her major co-stars including Jane Fonda, Cicely Tyson, Ava Gardner, etc. The Russian performers are at an obvious disadvantage and are poorly dubbed. And the ballets are just a bunch of jumping around and waving of arms. (This is choreography?) Irwin Kostal has a few nice moments but his score is largely unmemorable. File this under "What were they thinking?"

  • May 10, 2010

    La magia se pierde en piezas musicales, bailes e inconsistencias dentro de la historia, las metaforas que pudieron ser poderosas ("El Pajaro Azul") quedan ahi y resultan confusas al final....

    La magia se pierde en piezas musicales, bailes e inconsistencias dentro de la historia, las metaforas que pudieron ser poderosas ("El Pajaro Azul") quedan ahi y resultan confusas al final....

  • May 10, 2010

    La magia se pierde en piezas musicales, bailes e inconsistencias dentro de la historia, las metaforas que pudieron ser poderosas ("El Pajaro Azul") quedan ahi y resultan confusas al final....

    La magia se pierde en piezas musicales, bailes e inconsistencias dentro de la historia, las metaforas que pudieron ser poderosas ("El Pajaro Azul") quedan ahi y resultan confusas al final....

  • Aug 02, 2009

    Probably regarded as one of George Cukor's follies, this late 70's attempt to recapture the magical and musical grandeur of his earlier effort "My Fair Lady" falls flat on its face. Seeing this as a small child brought back a lot of nostalgic memories after watching this gem again recently. This movie has long vanished from VHS and US television. Tied up in legal tape, the only DVD copies available are in Russian (at the time it was a US/Russian co-financed production). Young Patsy Kensit stars as Mytyl, she and her older brother Tyltyl are visited by the Queen of Light (Elizabeth Taylor) who sends them on a magical quest to find the blue bird of happiness. If you've seen the Shirley Temple classic, this movie doesn't come anywhere near the magic of that gem. However if you are seeking out obscure hard-to-find and long-forgotten titles like this, this movie is perfect. Any late 70's production that showcase the talents of Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda, Ava Gardner, Cicely Tyson and Robert Morley in ONE bad movie, holds a special place within the cold cockles of my heart! Most of the big stars don't share any scenes with the others. Jane Fonda plays the evil "Night", spending her 8 minutes or so in what appears to be a Darth Vader costume meets drag (LOL), Ava Gardner plays "Luxury of Lust", hosting a gathering of debauchery and sin in what appears to be a circus tent... and then there's Elizabeth Taylor. Here she plays four roles including the mother of Mytyl and Tyltyl, an old hag and Maternal Love. The scenes where she sings are timeless, almost as bad as her lip syncing in the following year's musical travesty, "A Little Night Music". Most embarrassing include Cicely Tyson as the devious soul of the cat, a ballet dancer who appears out of a pitcher of milk, bizarre scenes of Russian ballet dancers interlaced with sorcery, hilarious high school props as stand ins for a forest that comes to life, and last but not least, Edith Head's last stand as a legendary Oscar-winning costume designer who had become incredibly redundant and out of touch with the current time. Nearly everything and everyone involved with the production is tarnished - most people don't know that at one time, both Katharine Hepburn and Shirley Maclaine had their names attached to this project but pulled out at the last minute. James Coco was replaced by George Cole. Production was also hampered by Elizabeth Taylor suffering several illnesses during the filming. Ava Gardner only signed on for free as a favor to George Cukor and Jane Fonda doesn't even mention this movie in her biography!!! (LOL) This is a MUST see for everyone! If you saw this as a child like I did, don't let it slip away from the recesses of what's left of your brain cells! The few musical numbers are actually quite catchy (when sung properly) and Patsy Kensit is so cute, you wouldn't even know that she grew up to be a modern day slag who married one of the douchebag brothers from Oasis. But most of all, watch it for Elizabeth and Ava, before they entered the 1980's completely overweight, middle-aged, battling dependencies and the twilight of their once glamorous careers.

    Probably regarded as one of George Cukor's follies, this late 70's attempt to recapture the magical and musical grandeur of his earlier effort "My Fair Lady" falls flat on its face. Seeing this as a small child brought back a lot of nostalgic memories after watching this gem again recently. This movie has long vanished from VHS and US television. Tied up in legal tape, the only DVD copies available are in Russian (at the time it was a US/Russian co-financed production). Young Patsy Kensit stars as Mytyl, she and her older brother Tyltyl are visited by the Queen of Light (Elizabeth Taylor) who sends them on a magical quest to find the blue bird of happiness. If you've seen the Shirley Temple classic, this movie doesn't come anywhere near the magic of that gem. However if you are seeking out obscure hard-to-find and long-forgotten titles like this, this movie is perfect. Any late 70's production that showcase the talents of Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda, Ava Gardner, Cicely Tyson and Robert Morley in ONE bad movie, holds a special place within the cold cockles of my heart! Most of the big stars don't share any scenes with the others. Jane Fonda plays the evil "Night", spending her 8 minutes or so in what appears to be a Darth Vader costume meets drag (LOL), Ava Gardner plays "Luxury of Lust", hosting a gathering of debauchery and sin in what appears to be a circus tent... and then there's Elizabeth Taylor. Here she plays four roles including the mother of Mytyl and Tyltyl, an old hag and Maternal Love. The scenes where she sings are timeless, almost as bad as her lip syncing in the following year's musical travesty, "A Little Night Music". Most embarrassing include Cicely Tyson as the devious soul of the cat, a ballet dancer who appears out of a pitcher of milk, bizarre scenes of Russian ballet dancers interlaced with sorcery, hilarious high school props as stand ins for a forest that comes to life, and last but not least, Edith Head's last stand as a legendary Oscar-winning costume designer who had become incredibly redundant and out of touch with the current time. Nearly everything and everyone involved with the production is tarnished - most people don't know that at one time, both Katharine Hepburn and Shirley Maclaine had their names attached to this project but pulled out at the last minute. James Coco was replaced by George Cole. Production was also hampered by Elizabeth Taylor suffering several illnesses during the filming. Ava Gardner only signed on for free as a favor to George Cukor and Jane Fonda doesn't even mention this movie in her biography!!! (LOL) This is a MUST see for everyone! If you saw this as a child like I did, don't let it slip away from the recesses of what's left of your brain cells! The few musical numbers are actually quite catchy (when sung properly) and Patsy Kensit is so cute, you wouldn't even know that she grew up to be a modern day slag who married one of the douchebag brothers from Oasis. But most of all, watch it for Elizabeth and Ava, before they entered the 1980's completely overweight, middle-aged, battling dependencies and the twilight of their once glamorous careers.