The Informer Reviews

  • Jul 23, 2020

    Engaging enough but nothing special.

    Engaging enough but nothing special.

  • May 26, 2020

    This movie was pretty sad. It's a movie about Irish desperate people who do things I don't think they would do normally. Yet they wonder why Irish and Native Americans have alcohol problems. Maybe because other countries come in and change their whole way of life and they are barely surviving below the surface. Anyway the main character was hard to like because he does something inexcusable and lashes out at everyone as a result. However, you know why he does it. This is a gritty film, shot grittily in black and white. It's well-acted and like a bad trainwreck u don't want to keep watching but feel compelled to. Pretty good film for that time period.

    This movie was pretty sad. It's a movie about Irish desperate people who do things I don't think they would do normally. Yet they wonder why Irish and Native Americans have alcohol problems. Maybe because other countries come in and change their whole way of life and they are barely surviving below the surface. Anyway the main character was hard to like because he does something inexcusable and lashes out at everyone as a result. However, you know why he does it. This is a gritty film, shot grittily in black and white. It's well-acted and like a bad trainwreck u don't want to keep watching but feel compelled to. Pretty good film for that time period.

  • Jan 17, 2019

    The best movie score ever composed!

    The best movie score ever composed!

  • Jan 01, 2016

    A tense & taut drama by cinema master John Ford. The story of everyday Irishman tempted & ultimately giving in to informing on his friend. Although a little confusing in parts but the mood & atmosphere is undeniably well done. A study of a man consumed by guilt & his desperate attempt to move on. A clever thinking man's film with some gorgeous cinematography.

    A tense & taut drama by cinema master John Ford. The story of everyday Irishman tempted & ultimately giving in to informing on his friend. Although a little confusing in parts but the mood & atmosphere is undeniably well done. A study of a man consumed by guilt & his desperate attempt to move on. A clever thinking man's film with some gorgeous cinematography.

  • Oct 03, 2015

    Pretty painful to watch. Victor McLaglen gives such a great performance. Cool storytelling with the lighting.

    Pretty painful to watch. Victor McLaglen gives such a great performance. Cool storytelling with the lighting.

  • Apr 23, 2015

    John Ford won his first of four Oscars for Best Director for this melodrama about the Irish War for Independence, an expertly shot and pretty well-acted film that isn't quite a classic, but is an enjoyable 90-minute watch. Victor McLaglen won the Best Actor Oscar for is portrayal of Gypo Nolan, the titular informer who sympathizes with the IRA yet rats out a friend of his so he can get a £20 reward and move with his girlfriend (Margot Grahame) to America. Of course, it's not that easy, and after a night of drunken spending the IRA realizes he must have been the one to rat the guy out since there's no way he could get so much money so quick, and they attempt to prove its guilt. There is some nice cinematography here, especially a shot on a staircase after a shoot-out in which the friend that Gypo ratted out is killed by the Black and Tan / Royal Army. He falls down the staircase, and all we see is his hand hanging over the edge as it twitches and finally dies. It's a powerful shot, probably the most memorable in the film. McLaglen is good in the lead role, especially in the scenes in which he's celebrating his newfound money by going around the town buying drinks for his friends. These scenes take up a good chunk of the movie. The main problem with the film is the Irish accents; obviously it's no problem for irish characters played by actual Irish people, but McLaglen and a few other important characters who are supposed to be Irish are actually played by Brits, and the juxtaposition of authentic and slightly off accents is a bit annoying at times. Still, this is an enjoyable movie overall and a must-see for any fans of Oscar and film history.

    John Ford won his first of four Oscars for Best Director for this melodrama about the Irish War for Independence, an expertly shot and pretty well-acted film that isn't quite a classic, but is an enjoyable 90-minute watch. Victor McLaglen won the Best Actor Oscar for is portrayal of Gypo Nolan, the titular informer who sympathizes with the IRA yet rats out a friend of his so he can get a £20 reward and move with his girlfriend (Margot Grahame) to America. Of course, it's not that easy, and after a night of drunken spending the IRA realizes he must have been the one to rat the guy out since there's no way he could get so much money so quick, and they attempt to prove its guilt. There is some nice cinematography here, especially a shot on a staircase after a shoot-out in which the friend that Gypo ratted out is killed by the Black and Tan / Royal Army. He falls down the staircase, and all we see is his hand hanging over the edge as it twitches and finally dies. It's a powerful shot, probably the most memorable in the film. McLaglen is good in the lead role, especially in the scenes in which he's celebrating his newfound money by going around the town buying drinks for his friends. These scenes take up a good chunk of the movie. The main problem with the film is the Irish accents; obviously it's no problem for irish characters played by actual Irish people, but McLaglen and a few other important characters who are supposed to be Irish are actually played by Brits, and the juxtaposition of authentic and slightly off accents is a bit annoying at times. Still, this is an enjoyable movie overall and a must-see for any fans of Oscar and film history.

  • Jan 20, 2015

    Magnificas actuaciones en esta fàbula sobre la culpa.

    Magnificas actuaciones en esta fàbula sobre la culpa.

  • Sep 02, 2014

    An Irish American attempt at adapting a perfectly good O'Flaherty story about 1922 Ireland and 'The Organisation'. In other words bloody terrible, condesending and ultimately insulting and that's just the American version of an Irish accent. There are many other things wrong with it, not least of all the terrible acting and the drunkin' Irish stereo type. Lets just say Ford, while professing to love Ireland, succeeds in demeaning us as a nation.

    An Irish American attempt at adapting a perfectly good O'Flaherty story about 1922 Ireland and 'The Organisation'. In other words bloody terrible, condesending and ultimately insulting and that's just the American version of an Irish accent. There are many other things wrong with it, not least of all the terrible acting and the drunkin' Irish stereo type. Lets just say Ford, while professing to love Ireland, succeeds in demeaning us as a nation.

  • Jim H Super Reviewer
    May 05, 2014

    After an Irishman informs against his IRA compatriots, he spends the money on a night on the town. John Ford's The Informer shows Ford's Irish sympathies with the same gusto that The Quiet Man did, but here he's more political, shaming an Irish informant for ninety-one minutes. The film's politics are anti-establishment, but the strength of this film is the performance by Victor McLaglen whose burly size and imposing physique belie the vulnerability with which he carouses through the story. It's a remarkably human portrayal in a remarkably political film. Overall, McLaglen keeps the film grounded and interesting.

    After an Irishman informs against his IRA compatriots, he spends the money on a night on the town. John Ford's The Informer shows Ford's Irish sympathies with the same gusto that The Quiet Man did, but here he's more political, shaming an Irish informant for ninety-one minutes. The film's politics are anti-establishment, but the strength of this film is the performance by Victor McLaglen whose burly size and imposing physique belie the vulnerability with which he carouses through the story. It's a remarkably human portrayal in a remarkably political film. Overall, McLaglen keeps the film grounded and interesting.

  • Apr 17, 2014

    The Informer (1935) - 8,5 After many years I finally re-watch one of my most cherished films while I was studying in university and I'm happy to see it didn't lose any appeal. The plot takes us back to the backstage of Irish War of Independence pitting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) against the authorities of the United Kingdom around 1922. Gypo Nolan is the star of the show, expelled from IRA, he informs the enemy forces about the whereabouts of his friend and former IRA comrade, Frankie McPhillip, in exchange for a monetary reward. McPhillip is killed by the British as a result. Following Nolan after he committed an act of treason, this film is a powerful illustration of the devastating effects that the overwhelming feeling of guilt can stir on a man and it's particularly interesting to see it on a character like Gypo Nolan. A man endowed with imposing physique and superlative strength made all the more intimidating (but also potentially pathetic) by his strange naiveness and volatile temper. I very much enjoy the more or less accomplished interpretation that Victor McLaglen carves of this crude character who ostensibly resorts to alcohol to relieve the weight on his shoulders, he displays good range and even becomes the epicenter of some pretty hilarious situations I can hardly resist. "The Informer" is a balancing act between sin and redemption, love and patriotism. Seen through today's eyes, the plot might seem slightly naive, but I am easily taken away by this film because it thrives with that sort of enchantment I worship in Classic B&W Cinema and it is a very well crafted work all around. "The Informer" was directed by John Ford and it demonstrates just how much cinematic and technical skill this North-American filmmaker possessed with black-and-white pictures, the cinematography and camera work are beautiful and highly expressive, the fog in the outer night scenery adds a layer of surreal claustrophobia to the atmosphere further reinforcing the perception that Nolan is living through a tenebrous situation, there are numerous memorable scenes and images where the contrast between light and dark reveals obvious influence of German Expressionism, the perfect chemistry between moving picture and music effectively builds up the movie's tone and emotional charge. The theatrical and exaggerated acting, typical of this time, fits perfectly in the fabric of this work and is very catchy. Moments of drama, action, romance and even comedy alternate fluently under the insightful conduct of Ford, never hindering the pace. In short, this is a very complete and coherent film where little or nothing distracts me from the wonderful cinematic experience at hand, one of my favorite movies from the 30s, though I still have much to see. The current silence and neglect around this John Ford masterpiece is disgraceful, it deserves much more attention in my opinion. I love it, highly recommended!

    The Informer (1935) - 8,5 After many years I finally re-watch one of my most cherished films while I was studying in university and I'm happy to see it didn't lose any appeal. The plot takes us back to the backstage of Irish War of Independence pitting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) against the authorities of the United Kingdom around 1922. Gypo Nolan is the star of the show, expelled from IRA, he informs the enemy forces about the whereabouts of his friend and former IRA comrade, Frankie McPhillip, in exchange for a monetary reward. McPhillip is killed by the British as a result. Following Nolan after he committed an act of treason, this film is a powerful illustration of the devastating effects that the overwhelming feeling of guilt can stir on a man and it's particularly interesting to see it on a character like Gypo Nolan. A man endowed with imposing physique and superlative strength made all the more intimidating (but also potentially pathetic) by his strange naiveness and volatile temper. I very much enjoy the more or less accomplished interpretation that Victor McLaglen carves of this crude character who ostensibly resorts to alcohol to relieve the weight on his shoulders, he displays good range and even becomes the epicenter of some pretty hilarious situations I can hardly resist. "The Informer" is a balancing act between sin and redemption, love and patriotism. Seen through today's eyes, the plot might seem slightly naive, but I am easily taken away by this film because it thrives with that sort of enchantment I worship in Classic B&W Cinema and it is a very well crafted work all around. "The Informer" was directed by John Ford and it demonstrates just how much cinematic and technical skill this North-American filmmaker possessed with black-and-white pictures, the cinematography and camera work are beautiful and highly expressive, the fog in the outer night scenery adds a layer of surreal claustrophobia to the atmosphere further reinforcing the perception that Nolan is living through a tenebrous situation, there are numerous memorable scenes and images where the contrast between light and dark reveals obvious influence of German Expressionism, the perfect chemistry between moving picture and music effectively builds up the movie's tone and emotional charge. The theatrical and exaggerated acting, typical of this time, fits perfectly in the fabric of this work and is very catchy. Moments of drama, action, romance and even comedy alternate fluently under the insightful conduct of Ford, never hindering the pace. In short, this is a very complete and coherent film where little or nothing distracts me from the wonderful cinematic experience at hand, one of my favorite movies from the 30s, though I still have much to see. The current silence and neglect around this John Ford masterpiece is disgraceful, it deserves much more attention in my opinion. I love it, highly recommended!