Nobody's Fool Reviews

  • Mar 02, 2020

    I am not sure what all the hype is about this movie. It was some what entertaining, but was too transparent. I kept wondering about how poor the direction was when I was not absorbed in the plot. I did like the final vindication, but ultimately I was wondering when it would end. It did have a strong cast that I felt was squandered on such a silly film.

    I am not sure what all the hype is about this movie. It was some what entertaining, but was too transparent. I kept wondering about how poor the direction was when I was not absorbed in the plot. I did like the final vindication, but ultimately I was wondering when it would end. It did have a strong cast that I felt was squandered on such a silly film.

  • Jan 26, 2020

    Paul Newman at his best.

    Paul Newman at his best.

  • Dec 28, 2019

    This is a beautiful adaptation of Richard Russo's novels, in its portrait of a very Russo-esque protagonist and of a small town in the rust belt northeast. Philip Seymour Hoffman shines in one of his first roles, and Philip Bosco is another of my favorites in the role of the local judge. On the other end of the spectrum, it was Jessica Tandy's last movie, she died before it was released, and it is a fine tribute to her. But of course it's Newman's movie, and he's wonderful as Sully. My favorite movie to watch around the holidays as it is set between Thanksgiving and New Year's.

    This is a beautiful adaptation of Richard Russo's novels, in its portrait of a very Russo-esque protagonist and of a small town in the rust belt northeast. Philip Seymour Hoffman shines in one of his first roles, and Philip Bosco is another of my favorites in the role of the local judge. On the other end of the spectrum, it was Jessica Tandy's last movie, she died before it was released, and it is a fine tribute to her. But of course it's Newman's movie, and he's wonderful as Sully. My favorite movie to watch around the holidays as it is set between Thanksgiving and New Year's.

  • Aug 27, 2018

    A well-written, solidly-cast flick about never being too old to change. Newman's performance is full of charisma and genuine charm that you can't help but root for him, even when he's in the wrong. 3.5/5 stars

    A well-written, solidly-cast flick about never being too old to change. Newman's performance is full of charisma and genuine charm that you can't help but root for him, even when he's in the wrong. 3.5/5 stars

  • Oct 02, 2017

    A nice, warm and hearfelt account of the life of a man in his 60's who's got to the point when he started to re-evaluate his views on family, friends and people who do care about him. A great and wise work by aging Paul Newman, interesting and important to the story also are numerous supporting roles including his would-be love interest Melanie Griffith, Bruce Willis as his mean employer, Jessica Tandy as his landlady. One can learn a thing or two watching this movie. Good portion of good-natured humor makes this movie a sweet and at times bittersweet experience.

    A nice, warm and hearfelt account of the life of a man in his 60's who's got to the point when he started to re-evaluate his views on family, friends and people who do care about him. A great and wise work by aging Paul Newman, interesting and important to the story also are numerous supporting roles including his would-be love interest Melanie Griffith, Bruce Willis as his mean employer, Jessica Tandy as his landlady. One can learn a thing or two watching this movie. Good portion of good-natured humor makes this movie a sweet and at times bittersweet experience.

  • Jul 28, 2017

    I've seen it upwards to 8 ~10 times, I think... There are moments where his performance is so brilliantly sublime that it puts to shame almost every other actor on the planet. The feelings he evokes from seemingly doing absolutely nothing (oh, but he's doing EVERYTHING needed to be done!) are inescapably mesmerizing ... a pure genius and master of his trade!

    I've seen it upwards to 8 ~10 times, I think... There are moments where his performance is so brilliantly sublime that it puts to shame almost every other actor on the planet. The feelings he evokes from seemingly doing absolutely nothing (oh, but he's doing EVERYTHING needed to be done!) are inescapably mesmerizing ... a pure genius and master of his trade!

  • May 17, 2016

    Disappointing. Yes, the setting of North Bath seemed real enough, but that's about as far as the verisimilitude reached. Despite all of those raves about Newman inhabiting the role of Sully, for me, Newman seemed like Newman, not Sully. And most of the relationships seemed like novelistic contrivances.

    Disappointing. Yes, the setting of North Bath seemed real enough, but that's about as far as the verisimilitude reached. Despite all of those raves about Newman inhabiting the role of Sully, for me, Newman seemed like Newman, not Sully. And most of the relationships seemed like novelistic contrivances.

  • Oct 16, 2015

    Newman is really good, as a down and out small town Joe, who really lives a bad life. He has made many mistakes in the past, and isn't considered a good person by his peers in the small New York town he lives in. Newman does kill the role, and proved he was one of the greats. He carries the movie, which is a character study, as far as he can take it...

    Newman is really good, as a down and out small town Joe, who really lives a bad life. He has made many mistakes in the past, and isn't considered a good person by his peers in the small New York town he lives in. Newman does kill the role, and proved he was one of the greats. He carries the movie, which is a character study, as far as he can take it...

  • Sep 02, 2015

    I very much liked nobodys fool paul newmans performance as a sometimes construction worker who is reunited with his son played by dylan walsh who he hasn't seen in about ten years is superb it also has a very good supporting cast with jessica tandy,bruce willis and melanie griffith

    I very much liked nobodys fool paul newmans performance as a sometimes construction worker who is reunited with his son played by dylan walsh who he hasn't seen in about ten years is superb it also has a very good supporting cast with jessica tandy,bruce willis and melanie griffith

  • Jun 23, 2015

    I have a theory that everyone, everyone, remains a teenager until they day they die. Not the teenagers of the "Porky" franchise or the airheads of "Clueless" necessarily, but the mature, emotionally headstrong old souls of "The Breakfast Club" and "Flirting". Some grown-up teenagers are more jaded, considerate, and successful than others, while the remaining irresponsible hooligans look like adults but, in a "Shallow Hal"-ish twist, are actually fifteen-year-olds still in search of an identity. Look at those middle-aged men and women with graying hair taking your order at Wendy's: are they not a regretful little girl or boy who doesn't quite realize they're trapped in an adult's body? Sully (Paul Newman) belongs in the camp of the charismatic loners who never took the time to accept their responsibilities and actually grow up. He has freelanced in the construction industry his entire life, most recently making the most of his aging body by suing Carl Roebuck (Bruce Willis), the local contractor, to get extra pocket change. Years ago, Sully left his family at an important time, leaving his now grown son (Dylan Walsh) emotionally stunted, his ex-wife understandably jilted - why he did it is hard to explain. Commitment was never very attractive to him, and having a family hardly supplemented his lone wolf instincts. Part of his psyche is tarnished by guilt, but the other side reminds him, time and time again, that being a father, a husband, was never for him anyway. Currently, Sully rooms with his former eighth grade teacher, the elderly Beryl Peoples (Jessica Tandy), and passes the time doing dirty work around town and flirting with Carl's long suffering wife (Melanie Griffith). This has been his routine for years, decades even. So when his son comes to town, his wife and kids in tow, Sully is forced, after years of ignoring his most personal problems, to decide whether or not he wants to make up for lost time and finally become the father his son deserved, or ignore the facts and continue living in his own form of sheltered reality. Paul Newman, even when playing the bad guy (a rare case), has never done anything besides be likable. In "Cool Hand Luke", he was a should-have-been tarnished anti-hero; in "The Verdict", he was an alcoholic grouch who felt it necessary to punch Charlotte Rampling right in the kisser after she betrayed him. Fact is, even when portraying a man at his lowest point, Newman has always been the guy you want to be friends with, the guy who wish was your father, your uncle, your grandfather. There is something starkly humble, and believably all-around good, about him, onscreen or off. In "Nobody's Fool", he plays a hustler we should, in our good senses, despise. Every character trait that shapes Sully is negative; what good has he done in his life besides make friends with barflies and keep his former teacher company? But damn it all to hell: it's impossible not to root for anyone portrayed by Newman. The film finds him nearing seventy, on the last legs of his long career. But hardly aged is his ability to give a face for the everyman, and, yes, the man-children who weren't fantastic youths but, hesitant or not, want to make up for it. Does "Nobody's Fool" provide for one of Newman's greatest performances? It's hard to say: he doesn't have to stretch his abilities like he has had to in the past. What he does do, though, is remind us why he is the movie star Hollywood, I'm sorry to say, can hardly muster today. Robert Benton, whose "The Late Show" has recently become a favorite of mine, writes and directs. A filmmaker who seems to specialize in the complexities of human relationships ("Kramer vs. Kramer", "Places of the Heart"), "Nobody's Fool" is masterful in its characterizations: near instantly, each character feels completely drawn, as if we have known them for years, as if we have heard all the town gossip that surrounds them. The knotty relationship between Sully and Toby Roebuck (Griffith) especially rings true - both are so fiercely independent that their flirting with one another comes less from a romantic place and more out of a desperate one. So unhappy are they that a mutual affection comforts their lonely ills. Romance, though? It requires too much commitment and dedication, and both have been too scorned by the past to do anything about their already shaky feelings. The characters of "Nobody's Fool" are almost abominably flawed, but we find their scarred personas more soothing than bothersome. We feel like we know these people, as if we also live in North Bath and have nothing better to do besides confide in our neighbor. Benton and his actors bring a world of lonely hearts startlingly to life; as messed up as they are, we want to be lonely with them.

    I have a theory that everyone, everyone, remains a teenager until they day they die. Not the teenagers of the "Porky" franchise or the airheads of "Clueless" necessarily, but the mature, emotionally headstrong old souls of "The Breakfast Club" and "Flirting". Some grown-up teenagers are more jaded, considerate, and successful than others, while the remaining irresponsible hooligans look like adults but, in a "Shallow Hal"-ish twist, are actually fifteen-year-olds still in search of an identity. Look at those middle-aged men and women with graying hair taking your order at Wendy's: are they not a regretful little girl or boy who doesn't quite realize they're trapped in an adult's body? Sully (Paul Newman) belongs in the camp of the charismatic loners who never took the time to accept their responsibilities and actually grow up. He has freelanced in the construction industry his entire life, most recently making the most of his aging body by suing Carl Roebuck (Bruce Willis), the local contractor, to get extra pocket change. Years ago, Sully left his family at an important time, leaving his now grown son (Dylan Walsh) emotionally stunted, his ex-wife understandably jilted - why he did it is hard to explain. Commitment was never very attractive to him, and having a family hardly supplemented his lone wolf instincts. Part of his psyche is tarnished by guilt, but the other side reminds him, time and time again, that being a father, a husband, was never for him anyway. Currently, Sully rooms with his former eighth grade teacher, the elderly Beryl Peoples (Jessica Tandy), and passes the time doing dirty work around town and flirting with Carl's long suffering wife (Melanie Griffith). This has been his routine for years, decades even. So when his son comes to town, his wife and kids in tow, Sully is forced, after years of ignoring his most personal problems, to decide whether or not he wants to make up for lost time and finally become the father his son deserved, or ignore the facts and continue living in his own form of sheltered reality. Paul Newman, even when playing the bad guy (a rare case), has never done anything besides be likable. In "Cool Hand Luke", he was a should-have-been tarnished anti-hero; in "The Verdict", he was an alcoholic grouch who felt it necessary to punch Charlotte Rampling right in the kisser after she betrayed him. Fact is, even when portraying a man at his lowest point, Newman has always been the guy you want to be friends with, the guy who wish was your father, your uncle, your grandfather. There is something starkly humble, and believably all-around good, about him, onscreen or off. In "Nobody's Fool", he plays a hustler we should, in our good senses, despise. Every character trait that shapes Sully is negative; what good has he done in his life besides make friends with barflies and keep his former teacher company? But damn it all to hell: it's impossible not to root for anyone portrayed by Newman. The film finds him nearing seventy, on the last legs of his long career. But hardly aged is his ability to give a face for the everyman, and, yes, the man-children who weren't fantastic youths but, hesitant or not, want to make up for it. Does "Nobody's Fool" provide for one of Newman's greatest performances? It's hard to say: he doesn't have to stretch his abilities like he has had to in the past. What he does do, though, is remind us why he is the movie star Hollywood, I'm sorry to say, can hardly muster today. Robert Benton, whose "The Late Show" has recently become a favorite of mine, writes and directs. A filmmaker who seems to specialize in the complexities of human relationships ("Kramer vs. Kramer", "Places of the Heart"), "Nobody's Fool" is masterful in its characterizations: near instantly, each character feels completely drawn, as if we have known them for years, as if we have heard all the town gossip that surrounds them. The knotty relationship between Sully and Toby Roebuck (Griffith) especially rings true - both are so fiercely independent that their flirting with one another comes less from a romantic place and more out of a desperate one. So unhappy are they that a mutual affection comforts their lonely ills. Romance, though? It requires too much commitment and dedication, and both have been too scorned by the past to do anything about their already shaky feelings. The characters of "Nobody's Fool" are almost abominably flawed, but we find their scarred personas more soothing than bothersome. We feel like we know these people, as if we also live in North Bath and have nothing better to do besides confide in our neighbor. Benton and his actors bring a world of lonely hearts startlingly to life; as messed up as they are, we want to be lonely with them.