Reviews

  • May 20, 2014

    A dreadful film with a dreadful plot.

    A dreadful film with a dreadful plot.

  • Oct 21, 2013

    Music congers up the mystic of the near east. Some famous names add depth to this movie with the strength of their characters. The story is harsh as it looks at past history from the making of a movie. Script is bitty at times as is the editing and direction making for a movie that lacks flow and gets confusing with the sub-plots that fail to complete. Nibbles: Meze.

    Music congers up the mystic of the near east. Some famous names add depth to this movie with the strength of their characters. The story is harsh as it looks at past history from the making of a movie. Script is bitty at times as is the editing and direction making for a movie that lacks flow and gets confusing with the sub-plots that fail to complete. Nibbles: Meze.

  • May 08, 2013

    I loved Egoyan's film Adoration, but although this movie had a necessary message, it lacked the gut-wrenching punch that many films about the Holocaust during WWII have. For some reason, the film within the film comes across as very stilted and too didactic, reminding me of poor quality movies from Sunday school classes in my youth. There are also too many plot lines here that take away from the impact a single focus could have brought to the finished project. Some scenes were very effective, but not the film as a whole. However, it did bring some questions to the fore, such as why Hitler's genocide, the practical extinction of Native Americans, and the enslavement of africans all get so much attention, but the annihilation of the Armenians so little.

    I loved Egoyan's film Adoration, but although this movie had a necessary message, it lacked the gut-wrenching punch that many films about the Holocaust during WWII have. For some reason, the film within the film comes across as very stilted and too didactic, reminding me of poor quality movies from Sunday school classes in my youth. There are also too many plot lines here that take away from the impact a single focus could have brought to the finished project. Some scenes were very effective, but not the film as a whole. However, it did bring some questions to the fore, such as why Hitler's genocide, the practical extinction of Native Americans, and the enslavement of africans all get so much attention, but the annihilation of the Armenians so little.

  • Nov 22, 2012

    The Armenian Genocide have never been a shock to us as the Holocaust was which probably all have heard of. But very few is aware that it was an Armenian executed by the Turks where around 1.5 million Armenians died. To this day, the Turkish government denies that there ever where a genocide, which have shaken the relationship between the two once peaceful people. There's some countries that have accepted the genocide, and some countries that doesn't. It's a questions about facts. And that's probably why there isn't any Armenian Schindler's List. The Canadian-Armenian director Atom Egoyan's Ararat is probably the closes thing, and probably the closes thing to the truth, because it's a film about the making of a film about the Armenian Genocide directed by Edward Saroyan following the story of the young expressionist painter, Arshile Gorky and his struggles during the Genocide. And of course this film within the film is lavish and one dimensional that doesn't tell the truth. But our protagonist is the camera assistant Raffi, who's suppose to bring the film footage back to Canada from Turkey. But at the airport the custom officer (Christopher Plummer) suspect that there's other things inside the film cans besides film and Raffi tells him everything about the making of the film. Ararat is not a bad film, but it's far from great, thanks to all it's almost useless subplots that doesn't evolves the genocide at all. and a to theatrical meta film making, which makes the film within the film a propaganda film. But Ararat also show us the other side and the doubt within the characters, and how their fascination to the Armenian genocide, where we see in the relation between Riffi and his mother. I also liked Christopher Plummer's performance and the interrogation plot line, which is for the outsider's who never heard of the Armenian genocide. I though this film was in a way to pretentious and to naive. I'm you looking for the ultimate coverage of the Armenian genocide, then sadly this is the closes you get, because theirs few films about that subject matter. I would have loved if this film was provoking, but it isn't. It's a safe drama film. I hope this a real epic about the Armenian genocide is coming soon. But for now, Ararat is the best we got, and it's overall not that bad. Thumbs up.

    The Armenian Genocide have never been a shock to us as the Holocaust was which probably all have heard of. But very few is aware that it was an Armenian executed by the Turks where around 1.5 million Armenians died. To this day, the Turkish government denies that there ever where a genocide, which have shaken the relationship between the two once peaceful people. There's some countries that have accepted the genocide, and some countries that doesn't. It's a questions about facts. And that's probably why there isn't any Armenian Schindler's List. The Canadian-Armenian director Atom Egoyan's Ararat is probably the closes thing, and probably the closes thing to the truth, because it's a film about the making of a film about the Armenian Genocide directed by Edward Saroyan following the story of the young expressionist painter, Arshile Gorky and his struggles during the Genocide. And of course this film within the film is lavish and one dimensional that doesn't tell the truth. But our protagonist is the camera assistant Raffi, who's suppose to bring the film footage back to Canada from Turkey. But at the airport the custom officer (Christopher Plummer) suspect that there's other things inside the film cans besides film and Raffi tells him everything about the making of the film. Ararat is not a bad film, but it's far from great, thanks to all it's almost useless subplots that doesn't evolves the genocide at all. and a to theatrical meta film making, which makes the film within the film a propaganda film. But Ararat also show us the other side and the doubt within the characters, and how their fascination to the Armenian genocide, where we see in the relation between Riffi and his mother. I also liked Christopher Plummer's performance and the interrogation plot line, which is for the outsider's who never heard of the Armenian genocide. I though this film was in a way to pretentious and to naive. I'm you looking for the ultimate coverage of the Armenian genocide, then sadly this is the closes you get, because theirs few films about that subject matter. I would have loved if this film was provoking, but it isn't. It's a safe drama film. I hope this a real epic about the Armenian genocide is coming soon. But for now, Ararat is the best we got, and it's overall not that bad. Thumbs up.

  • Jul 21, 2012

    This is a difficult film to follow. There are several stories being told, with the backdrop being the Armenian Genocide. Despite being difficult to follow, I found myself unable to pull away. I believe the film gets better with each viewing. It definitely left me wanting to learn more about the plight of the Armenians.

    This is a difficult film to follow. There are several stories being told, with the backdrop being the Armenian Genocide. Despite being difficult to follow, I found myself unable to pull away. I believe the film gets better with each viewing. It definitely left me wanting to learn more about the plight of the Armenians.

  • May 18, 2012

    (** 1/2): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon13.gif[/img] I wanted to like this more, but the film just didn't grab and keep my attention. A near-miss.

    (** 1/2): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon13.gif[/img] I wanted to like this more, but the film just didn't grab and keep my attention. A near-miss.

  • Mar 15, 2012

    Just a really poorly made movie, especially considering that the story it is based on is so interesting.

    Just a really poorly made movie, especially considering that the story it is based on is so interesting.

  • Sep 07, 2011

    Discusses the Armenian genocide in Eastern Turkey, through the eyes of an Armenian painter/escapee. I didn't understand the link between the annoying step-sister/mother/son storyline with the backstory (in that Turkey denies the genocide ever happened.)

    Discusses the Armenian genocide in Eastern Turkey, through the eyes of an Armenian painter/escapee. I didn't understand the link between the annoying step-sister/mother/son storyline with the backstory (in that Turkey denies the genocide ever happened.)

  • Mar 09, 2011

    What a complex, layered gem that all folds together and resonates beautifully. Egoyan is a master structuralist and one of our greatest writer/directors. I can't even begin to contemplate being able to write at this level.

    What a complex, layered gem that all folds together and resonates beautifully. Egoyan is a master structuralist and one of our greatest writer/directors. I can't even begin to contemplate being able to write at this level.

  • Mar 07, 2011

    This movie stayed in my mind long after I saw it. I was brought up with my Grandmother who resembled the mother of the painter in the movie. I have heard the tale of the massacre from my family and from my grandmother. I have seen her scars. I have heard her wake up in the middle of the night screaming.... she died when she was about 100. Her exact age uncertain because she had blocked out memories. I have always been awed by her history and her ability to survive. The movie brought back things that she taught me.... exactly. How could a movie bring the complexity of a people destroyed, yet in many ways vibrant. I have heard the same things that the turkish man in the movie said. I was confused by the plot, but I could tell that the plot did not transcend the story- the story itself was like a painting. Like the hands of the mother in the painting, unfinished.... or left unclear for you and I to imagine. Anyone seeing the movie should probably let go of a need to control the story and simply observe.... and get uncomfortable... take the nuggets of the film much like Charles Az... character did with the pomegranate, treasure the seeds in your stomach since history does not give us the room to eat each seed one at a time. What I realized after the movie is how lucky I am to be alive. I am grateful for the courage and imagination that Egoyan and others used to create this ground breaking film. I am now two days after seeing the movie and I continue to appreciate what the artists did. Anyone seeing the movie and judging it as a "melodrama" has not really understood it- I believe. The movie transcends a genocide of a people and brings up the issue of accountability for the every day person. The movie affirms humanity and the value of a person's individual experience.

    This movie stayed in my mind long after I saw it. I was brought up with my Grandmother who resembled the mother of the painter in the movie. I have heard the tale of the massacre from my family and from my grandmother. I have seen her scars. I have heard her wake up in the middle of the night screaming.... she died when she was about 100. Her exact age uncertain because she had blocked out memories. I have always been awed by her history and her ability to survive. The movie brought back things that she taught me.... exactly. How could a movie bring the complexity of a people destroyed, yet in many ways vibrant. I have heard the same things that the turkish man in the movie said. I was confused by the plot, but I could tell that the plot did not transcend the story- the story itself was like a painting. Like the hands of the mother in the painting, unfinished.... or left unclear for you and I to imagine. Anyone seeing the movie should probably let go of a need to control the story and simply observe.... and get uncomfortable... take the nuggets of the film much like Charles Az... character did with the pomegranate, treasure the seeds in your stomach since history does not give us the room to eat each seed one at a time. What I realized after the movie is how lucky I am to be alive. I am grateful for the courage and imagination that Egoyan and others used to create this ground breaking film. I am now two days after seeing the movie and I continue to appreciate what the artists did. Anyone seeing the movie and judging it as a "melodrama" has not really understood it- I believe. The movie transcends a genocide of a people and brings up the issue of accountability for the every day person. The movie affirms humanity and the value of a person's individual experience.