The Aristocrats Reviews

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November 1, 2007
The first feel-good movie made out of fecal matter.
February 9, 2006
This all-star open-mike night loses its luster before its own loud laughter dies down.
January 27, 2006
With a showman's respect for the power of the build-up, Provenza touts his product thoroughly before unveiling it.
December 9, 2005
... The Aristocrats proves that sometimes you don't have to be a great filmmaker to make a great documentary.
September 26, 2005
Within a single joke, The Aristocrats unlocks an entire universe of comedy.
September 24, 2005
The film has the feel of a long and fascinating chat rather than a formal thesis. But if it feels a little self-congratulatory at times, that's a small price to pay.
September 2, 2005
What the film really reveals is the role of the comedian in society and the craftsmanship of joke-writing and joke delivery.
August 25, 2005
Let me reiterate. This movie is really, really dirty.
August 25, 2005
See it if you aren't too jaded to appreciate a few laughs in these mostly mirthless times.
August 22, 2005
Exudes cheerfulness and expansive joy.
August 13, 2005
Like The Joke after which it is named, it's easily dismissed.
August 12, 2005
For my taste, the joke is a little too scatological for comfort.
August 12, 2005
Under normal circumstances, nothing kills a joke faster than trying to explain it. Yet here, such examination is the film's strong suit and provides much-needed respite, quite frankly, from the exhaustion of constant laughter.
August 12, 2005
If the Marquis de Sade had set The 120 Days of Sodom in a Catskills club, the result might have been something like The Aristocrats.
August 12, 2005
It's very funny, but it's also a bit dull.
August 12, 2005
Like the joke, the filmmakers keep their movie alive, not by changing any of the fundamentals but by finding new ways to embroider the basic material.
August 12, 2005
I laughed myself blue.
August 12, 2005
The joke itself is not very funny: It's the delivery, the invention and grossness each comedian brings to it that makes it funny.
August 12, 2005
Alone, the jokes would become a tedious, 87-minute blur. But The Aristocrats also has eloquent analyses by George Carlin, show-stealing bits by Sarah Silverman and Whoopi Goldberg, and inventive ways to keep the joke from getting stale.
August 12, 2005
The iron rule: There ain't nothing funny about analyzing comedy. The bizarre exception: The Aristocrats..
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