Drop Dead Fred Reviews

  • Feb 03, 2020

    I love this movie! Watched it for the first time when I was 11 in the theaters and have watched it at least 10 times in my adult life.

    I love this movie! Watched it for the first time when I was 11 in the theaters and have watched it at least 10 times in my adult life.

  • Jan 17, 2020

    Awesome movie! It's really creative, and the acting is great. Really good story too.

    Awesome movie! It's really creative, and the acting is great. Really good story too.

  • Sep 29, 2019

    Feeling more like a bunch of disconnected skits from a cancelled TV show that had additional footage to connect them all together rather than an actual fantasy comedy, Drop Dead Fred has an obnoxious titular character, a brainless script and tries to deal with themes of mental illness seriously but when you have a movie as annoying as this, the attempt really doesn't work. This movie's worse than dumb.

    Feeling more like a bunch of disconnected skits from a cancelled TV show that had additional footage to connect them all together rather than an actual fantasy comedy, Drop Dead Fred has an obnoxious titular character, a brainless script and tries to deal with themes of mental illness seriously but when you have a movie as annoying as this, the attempt really doesn't work. This movie's worse than dumb.

  • Sep 15, 2019

    I don't know I loved this movie as a kid, I re-watched it ten minutes ago even though its bloody stressful I still really love it.

    I don't know I loved this movie as a kid, I re-watched it ten minutes ago even though its bloody stressful I still really love it.

  • Sep 13, 2019

    Best movie ever!! I remember watching this with my sisters growing up!! Love it still love it always!!

    Best movie ever!! I remember watching this with my sisters growing up!! Love it still love it always!!

  • Aug 15, 2019

    Hilarious and charming. Brings out the kid in all of us. Everyone should have a little fred in their lives!

    Hilarious and charming. Brings out the kid in all of us. Everyone should have a little fred in their lives!

  • Aug 13, 2019

    This was a fantastic movie, The people that say it is dumb only think that because they are dumb themselves

    This was a fantastic movie, The people that say it is dumb only think that because they are dumb themselves

  • Aug 11, 2019

    First of all: #TeamFred — but why? What can be rightly said about Fred? He is an agent of puerile chaos, yet unlike Dennis the Menace or Martin Short's CLIFFORD, Fred is of an ontologically separate order: Belonging to the world of children without actually being a child, an exclusion among the exclusions, a part of no part, Fred has the quasi-real status of a specter. Like Schrödinger's cat, he is already dead (as his name suggests) before he is even let out of his box, existing merely to disappear again, a vanishing mediator between youth and adulthood; yet Fred is simultaneously undead, an elastic and indestructible figure of irrepressible, tumultuous life as characterized by the death drive tumbling towards self-annihilation. In a psychoanalytic sense, then, Fred is not so much a manifestation of Elizabeth's Id—too nebulous a concept that, anyway, and ultimately unimaginable—but closer to the mythic creature that Lacan labels the "lamella," the object-libido that marks life as deprived of the Symbolic order. As Dylan Evans glosses the term: "The lamella is the human being as pre-sexual, pre-subject substance, that something in the human subject that is not reducible to the pure digitality of the symbolic," such that the lamella's materialization, Fred's return to Elizabeth's life in a moment of crisis, functions to situate her as a subject, "marking [her] place in the field of group relations…and at the same time, [he] obviously has an erotic function" by inscribing the sheer physicality and reality of the body. This would be why Fred makes for such a contentious character: At heart, he embodies the sheer grossness and unruliness of the body itself, those libidinally charged aspects of human experience that cannot simply be repressed and which must inevitably return with a vengeance. That is to say, those on #TeamSanity are not wrong to think Fred is an obnoxious and disgusting figure, for the whole point here is that Elizabeth must learn anew how to relate to those basic corporeal qualities in a healthier fashion in order to pass through to the more mature stages of psychosocial development beyond the repressive injunctions of the threatening maternal superego. Yet despite the suggestive nuance at work in the screenplay, the execution leaves something to be desired, especially as the movie tends to slip into simpler, most standard psychological formations, transforming Fred, like so many other figures of conventional Hollywood psychology, into the general Jungian archetype of a trickster god who belongs to a collective unconscious (which explains those problematic scenes where he lives beyond Elizabeth's imagination). Likewise, just as the film never gets a handle on who Fred is meant to be, so too do the filmmakers fail to understand who their audience is, with language and themes better suited to adults, but music and slapstick meant to entertain kids. In this way, the film is ultimately as confused as Elizabeth herself.

    First of all: #TeamFred — but why? What can be rightly said about Fred? He is an agent of puerile chaos, yet unlike Dennis the Menace or Martin Short's CLIFFORD, Fred is of an ontologically separate order: Belonging to the world of children without actually being a child, an exclusion among the exclusions, a part of no part, Fred has the quasi-real status of a specter. Like Schrödinger's cat, he is already dead (as his name suggests) before he is even let out of his box, existing merely to disappear again, a vanishing mediator between youth and adulthood; yet Fred is simultaneously undead, an elastic and indestructible figure of irrepressible, tumultuous life as characterized by the death drive tumbling towards self-annihilation. In a psychoanalytic sense, then, Fred is not so much a manifestation of Elizabeth's Id—too nebulous a concept that, anyway, and ultimately unimaginable—but closer to the mythic creature that Lacan labels the "lamella," the object-libido that marks life as deprived of the Symbolic order. As Dylan Evans glosses the term: "The lamella is the human being as pre-sexual, pre-subject substance, that something in the human subject that is not reducible to the pure digitality of the symbolic," such that the lamella's materialization, Fred's return to Elizabeth's life in a moment of crisis, functions to situate her as a subject, "marking [her] place in the field of group relations…and at the same time, [he] obviously has an erotic function" by inscribing the sheer physicality and reality of the body. This would be why Fred makes for such a contentious character: At heart, he embodies the sheer grossness and unruliness of the body itself, those libidinally charged aspects of human experience that cannot simply be repressed and which must inevitably return with a vengeance. That is to say, those on #TeamSanity are not wrong to think Fred is an obnoxious and disgusting figure, for the whole point here is that Elizabeth must learn anew how to relate to those basic corporeal qualities in a healthier fashion in order to pass through to the more mature stages of psychosocial development beyond the repressive injunctions of the threatening maternal superego. Yet despite the suggestive nuance at work in the screenplay, the execution leaves something to be desired, especially as the movie tends to slip into simpler, most standard psychological formations, transforming Fred, like so many other figures of conventional Hollywood psychology, into the general Jungian archetype of a trickster god who belongs to a collective unconscious (which explains those problematic scenes where he lives beyond Elizabeth's imagination). Likewise, just as the film never gets a handle on who Fred is meant to be, so too do the filmmakers fail to understand who their audience is, with language and themes better suited to adults, but music and slapstick meant to entertain kids. In this way, the film is ultimately as confused as Elizabeth herself.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    Absolute comedy classic!

    Absolute comedy classic!

  • Jun 01, 2019

    Simply awful! Carrie Fisher is always good to great. And she is at her most beautiful in this adult role. Phoebe Cates holds her own in the midst of an utterly terrible script. Whoever green-lighted this better have saved their money, because this could be a real career-killer.

    Simply awful! Carrie Fisher is always good to great. And she is at her most beautiful in this adult role. Phoebe Cates holds her own in the midst of an utterly terrible script. Whoever green-lighted this better have saved their money, because this could be a real career-killer.