Dynamite Brothers Reviews

  • Dec 01, 2012

    Dynamite Brothers (AKA East Meets Watts) is an interesting film. Not on so much a technical level, but on just the sheer amount of actors in it. You have Timothy Brown, who at that point was only known for his small-lived role of Spearchucker on the first season of M*A*S*H, but also James Hong, who shows up in the cast as a villain. On that level, it at least bears some sort of merit. Everything else is pretty much a mess. Sure the martial arts sequences are pretty good, but they're a dime a dozen for this type of genre. There's nothing special about them, or this film. It's your standard east meets west sort of movie, and not a very good one. It was taken to town on an episode of Cinematic Titanic under its alternate title though.

    Dynamite Brothers (AKA East Meets Watts) is an interesting film. Not on so much a technical level, but on just the sheer amount of actors in it. You have Timothy Brown, who at that point was only known for his small-lived role of Spearchucker on the first season of M*A*S*H, but also James Hong, who shows up in the cast as a villain. On that level, it at least bears some sort of merit. Everything else is pretty much a mess. Sure the martial arts sequences are pretty good, but they're a dime a dozen for this type of genre. There's nothing special about them, or this film. It's your standard east meets west sort of movie, and not a very good one. It was taken to town on an episode of Cinematic Titanic under its alternate title though.

  • Mar 10, 2010

    Had Aldo Ray not been cast, this would've been less pleasant.

    Had Aldo Ray not been cast, this would've been less pleasant.

  • Feb 21, 2010

    Hippie fight! Extras from BJ and The Bear square off against the cast of a Shaw Brothers film in this wacky 70s gem. Timothy Brown and Alan Tang are forced together in a quest to fight drug pushers and find Tang's long lost brother. Pimps, pushers, Chinese drug lords (James Hong!), open shirts, and lots of red paint for blood. The editing is laughably bad, as is the film's sense of geography (why was an apartment across the street in one scene, and across town in another? Why when you look left on any given busy city street can you find a block of burned out, semi-abandoned buildings? Hang on, wasn't he just driving in the mountains?). Great fun, and a good watch with like minded friends.

    Hippie fight! Extras from BJ and The Bear square off against the cast of a Shaw Brothers film in this wacky 70s gem. Timothy Brown and Alan Tang are forced together in a quest to fight drug pushers and find Tang's long lost brother. Pimps, pushers, Chinese drug lords (James Hong!), open shirts, and lots of red paint for blood. The editing is laughably bad, as is the film's sense of geography (why was an apartment across the street in one scene, and across town in another? Why when you look left on any given busy city street can you find a block of burned out, semi-abandoned buildings? Hang on, wasn't he just driving in the mountains?). Great fun, and a good watch with like minded friends.

  • Dec 27, 2009

    It may seem difficult to believe that someone has managed to screw up a movie in which a character named Stud Brown is handcuffed to someone named Larry Chin and the duo fights druglords while also finding time for love, but it has been done. Please pause and let this sink in for a second. Perhaps this is a bit unfair as the duo are only handcuffed together for about 20 minutes, and about 19 of those minutes are spent fighting "Deliverance" extras and running around aimlessly in the Californian-countryside. Nevermind how our heroes crossed paths. It really doesn't matter. Larry is looking for his long-lost brother and Stud is trying to charm Sarah (complete with the ludicrous serenading of "Sarah and Stud" in Sarah's apartment and it is even worse than you can imagine, believe me). Then we have this cop with a serious racial chip on his shoulder, a guy named "Smiling Man" who has connections and the presence of James Hong as a guy who has an endless supply of 70s henchmen (one of whom I think is punched out by another henchman during a climactic fight scene... it's kind of hard to tell). None of it works and none of it approaches the coveted "so bad, it's good" level that really makes for an entertaining event. From the shoddy camera to the limited production values (good luck to anyone who can figure out what exactly is going on in the nighttime shootout on the street that was apparently taking place during an eclipse) and the sheer confusion of it all (apparently Betty just disappeared in the middle of this movie and was never seen again... I choose to believe she ventured off the set and tried to find a better movie to "act" in), this is painful.

    It may seem difficult to believe that someone has managed to screw up a movie in which a character named Stud Brown is handcuffed to someone named Larry Chin and the duo fights druglords while also finding time for love, but it has been done. Please pause and let this sink in for a second. Perhaps this is a bit unfair as the duo are only handcuffed together for about 20 minutes, and about 19 of those minutes are spent fighting "Deliverance" extras and running around aimlessly in the Californian-countryside. Nevermind how our heroes crossed paths. It really doesn't matter. Larry is looking for his long-lost brother and Stud is trying to charm Sarah (complete with the ludicrous serenading of "Sarah and Stud" in Sarah's apartment and it is even worse than you can imagine, believe me). Then we have this cop with a serious racial chip on his shoulder, a guy named "Smiling Man" who has connections and the presence of James Hong as a guy who has an endless supply of 70s henchmen (one of whom I think is punched out by another henchman during a climactic fight scene... it's kind of hard to tell). None of it works and none of it approaches the coveted "so bad, it's good" level that really makes for an entertaining event. From the shoddy camera to the limited production values (good luck to anyone who can figure out what exactly is going on in the nighttime shootout on the street that was apparently taking place during an eclipse) and the sheer confusion of it all (apparently Betty just disappeared in the middle of this movie and was never seen again... I choose to believe she ventured off the set and tried to find a better movie to "act" in), this is painful.

  • Mar 01, 2009

    Oh, just so hysterically awful! One of those so-bad-it's-good flicks. Two guys handcuffed together, but that's given up on quickly. Saw it riffed by the ex-MST3K-ers of Cinematic Titanic. Made the awfulness awfully funny!

    Oh, just so hysterically awful! One of those so-bad-it's-good flicks. Two guys handcuffed together, but that's given up on quickly. Saw it riffed by the ex-MST3K-ers of Cinematic Titanic. Made the awfulness awfully funny!

  • Jan 01, 2008

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  • Feb 21, 2006

    Al Adamson built his Z-movie career by milking whatever genre was making the most money at the time, be it horror or biker flicks. Here however he actually developed an original idea of his own (albeit combining two popular genres) by teaming up martial arts with blaxploitation and therefore beating Rush Hour by some 30 years. Of course he still managed to make a pig's ear out of it but then it wouldn't be a Adamson film without the wooden acting and static camera work. I won't bother with the plot (Adamson obviously didn't) but the film commits the mortal sin of making a B-movie boring. Here he had the opportunity to combine two relatively explosive genres and create a great actioner but instead he delivers a boring dud. There are some moments of unintentional humour (the pimp slashing bit is amusing) but otherwise this film lacks any real spark. Only worth a look if you are a Blaxploit' completist like myself.

    Al Adamson built his Z-movie career by milking whatever genre was making the most money at the time, be it horror or biker flicks. Here however he actually developed an original idea of his own (albeit combining two popular genres) by teaming up martial arts with blaxploitation and therefore beating Rush Hour by some 30 years. Of course he still managed to make a pig's ear out of it but then it wouldn't be a Adamson film without the wooden acting and static camera work. I won't bother with the plot (Adamson obviously didn't) but the film commits the mortal sin of making a B-movie boring. Here he had the opportunity to combine two relatively explosive genres and create a great actioner but instead he delivers a boring dud. There are some moments of unintentional humour (the pimp slashing bit is amusing) but otherwise this film lacks any real spark. Only worth a look if you are a Blaxploit' completist like myself.